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8 JAHUA 
40* a copy • v 



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®C 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



23- 4 % Gas-Oil 

Dominance 



Market figures prove WXEX-TV Grade B 
area families spend 23.4% more at filling 
stations than Grade B area families 
of any other Richmond market TV station 



Amount Spent on Gas, Oil, lubricants 



WXEX-TV 
Station B 
Station C 



by Grade B Area Families 


Percentage 


$73,806,000 


100% 




$59,529,000 


80.7% 




$59,812,000 


81% 



Source: Sidney Hollander Associates 



WXEX-TV 

Tom Tinsley, President NBC BASIC - CHANNEL 8 Irvin G. Abeloff, Vice Pres. 

National Representatives: Select Station Representatives in New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington. 
Forjoe & Co. in Chicago, Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Dallas, Atlanta. 



WILL NBC RADIO 
SCORE ITS 
GREATEST COUP? 

Network Bet out to 
clear 826,5 10 bIoU foi 

it 9 new five-m i u u t<- 
news plan. At presstime 

it had 78' i clt-ii red 

Page 23 



Can kid talent 
shows build a 
mass audience? 

Page 26 

Pros and cons 
of rating hypos: 
a debate 

Page 28 



Tv Results for 
varied products 
throughout U. S. 

Page 33 






te«TJ^fai^ 




ONE-THIRD OF THE POPULATION OF 
WISCONSIN CAN NOW WATCH THE MOST 
CONSISTENTLY ENTERTAINING PROGRAMS. 



WFRV-TV's NTH- TOWER 
IS NOW IN USE. 



This station can deliver the con- 
centrated above-the-average metropolitan 
zones of Eastern Wisconsin north of 
Milwaukee . . . the Greater Green Bay 
metropolitan area . . . the Fabulous Fox 
Cities group (Per family Effective Buy- 
ing Income S6020) . . . the Fond du 
Lac-Oshkosh zone . . . the Manitowoc- 
Sheboygan zone. 

25 counties where people have the mon- 
ey to buy the things they want . . . and 
buy them. More than a third of all the 
state's counties and just about a third of 
the state's people. 



*NTH — Nearest to Heaven" highest antenna 
in 5 state area. 1165 ft. above average ter- 
rain. Maximum Power. Basic ABC plus CBS 
plus strong area programming on Channel 5. 



WFRV TV 

GREEN BAY, WISCONSIN 

ask HEADLEY-REED 

to show you that new FACT BOOK! 



WAKR 



(AKRON'S NO. 1 RADIO STATION) 



AND 



WAKR-T.V. 



(AKRON'S ONLY TV. STATION) 








...take pleasure 
in announcing 
that, 

effective immediately/ 
both stations 
will be 
represented 
nationally 
by... 



BURKE-STUART COMPANY INC. 



NEW YORK 

CHICAGO 

DETROIT 

LOS ANGELES 

SAN FRANCISCO 



SPONSOR • 5 JANUARY 1957 



5 January 1957 • Vol. II. Vo. / 

SPONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 



Will NBC Radio score its greatest coup? 

23 Newesl c :ep1 in network radio programing has been met with oppos- 
ing point- of view. Here's factual analysis and evaluation of the plan 

Can kid talent shows get top ratings? 

26 Horn & Hardart, East Coast food store and restaurant operator, finds 
the> ran. pointing to 30 years of radio and eighl years <>f television 

Do rating hypos help stations? 

28 Ur station giveaway contests destructive to the industry or do they 
have a place in dynamic promotion. Highlights of a recent RTES debate 

Why TWA switched to 52-week spot radio 

30 Airline i- -pending $700,000 annually in spot radio and is using it 
all year round after tests with sporadic "flights" brought results 

TV results section 

33 Brief and to the point, each capsule case history contains television 
costs and specific results obtained. You'll find ideas here you can use 



FEATURES 

16 \gency Ad Libs 
20 19th and Madison 
52 Mr. Sponsor 
S4- New and Renew 
56 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

5 \i-u -maker of the Week 
70 Keps at Work 
50 Sponsor Asks 



64 Sponsor Hears 
9 Sponsor-Scope 
72 Sponsor Speaks 
55 Spot Buys 
72 Ten Second Spots 
14 Timebuyers at Work 
68 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 
61 Washington Week 



In Next Week's Issue 



The alternate-week prohlem 

How can alternate-week agencies achieve close cooperation? Is alter- 
nate-week sponsorship a brake on tv's creativity? These are just a 
few of the many questions foi which SPONSOR is seeking answers 

How to give a package tv-appeal 

It tak'-- knowhow, as tlii- picture story will illustrate, to gi\e products 
eye-appeal in film commercials. These are some of the tricks of the trade 



Editor and President 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary -Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

Vice-President — General Manager 

Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 

Executive Editor 

Miles David 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Senior Editors 

Alfred J. Jaffe 
Evelyn Konrad 
Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Assistant Editors 

Joan W. Holland 
Jack Lindrup 
Betty Van Arsdel 

Contributing Editors 

Bob Foreman 
Joe Csida 

Art Editor 

Phil Franznick 

Production Editor 

Erwin Ephron 

Photographer 

Lester Cole 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Advertising Director 

Arnold Alpert 
New York Manager 
Charles W. Godwin 
Midwest Manager 
Kenneth M. Parker 
Western Manager 
Edwin D. Cooper 
Southern Manager 
Herb Martin 
Promotion Manager 
Mort Winthrop 
Production Manager 
Jean L. Engel 
Advertising Staff 
Marilyn Krameisen 
Georqe Becker 
Dianne Ely 

Administrative Coordinator 

Catherine Scott Rose 
Circulation Department 
Beryl Bynoe 
Emily Cutillo 
June Kelly 

Accounting Department 
Laura Oken 
Laura Datre 
Readers' Service 
Betty Rosenfeld 
Secretary to Publisher 
Carol Gardner 

Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive. Editorial, 
Circulation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 
49th St. (49th & Madison) New York 17, 
N. Y. Telephone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. 
Chicago Office: 161 E. Crand Ave. Phone: 
Superior 7-9863. Los Angeles Office: 6087 
Sunset Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4- 
8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., 
Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: United 
States $10 a year. Canada and foreign 
$11. Single copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. 
Address all correspondence to 40 E. 49th 
St.. N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. 
Published weekly by SPONSOR Publications 
Inc. Entered as second class matter on 
the 29 January 1948 at the Baltimore 
postoffice under the Act of 3 March 1879. 

Copyright 1957 

Sponsor Publications Inc. 



WOC TV 

-tk/f 



Proved by 648,330 Pieces of Program 
Mail received by this Station During 

6 full Yens ol felecastine . . . 




^jMwuu 



I his fabulous r* . . 

')\ ' , of ii to local live tele* >sts 

. . . began in 1950 I hai \< >r 

. . \\<>< i \ s first full \. u on 

tin .in 13345 pi< cesol 

program mail w ived; 

tins in. nl came from 2 J Icm 1 

Illinois counties — 237 uncs 

.111.1 d.UllS 

B) 1955, this response jumped 
10 1 tW.j 1 5 1 > 1 « 1 <s of program 
mi. 11I n 1 eived during .1 1 2- 
month period; ii > ame from J9 
low .1 Illinois 1 ounties - 513 
cities and towns in these counties 
Accompanying map shows 
breakdo* n ol this 1955 pro- 
gram mail, pro\ ing WOOTV's 

( lood fn tun" .iri.i 

\\ ( ;( 1 v Viewers ti respon- 
sive. I lit \ respond 10 W < >( l\ 
telecasts bj mail. Wore import- 
ant, thej respond to advertising 

o„ WO( I V In pun hist s ,,t 

retail outlets W e have .1 million 
success stories to prove it (well, 

almost .1 million \. lit \our 

nearest Peters, Griffin, ^ 
ward representative giv< 
the t.uts Or call us direct 



WOC-TV 39-COUNTY COVERAGE DATA - 



Population 


• 


Families 


• 


Retail Sales 


• 


Effective Buying Income 


• 


Source 


• 


Number TV Homes 


• 


Source 


• 



1 ,568,500 
(84,800 

$ 1,926,588,000 
B2,388,000 

1956 Survej ol Buying Income 

< Sales Management ) 

$17,902 

Advertising Research 

Foundation 




WOC-TV Owned and Operated by Central Broadcasting Company, 

Davenport, Iowa 



The Quint-Cities Station — 
Davenport and Bettendorf 
in Iowa; Rock Island, Mo- 
line and East Moline in 
Illinois 




Col B J Polmer, president 
Ernest C Sonder, resident manager 
Mark Wodlinger resident soles monog 
PETERS. GRIFFIN WOODWARD. INC 
Exclusive Notional Repreientol. . e 




WHIRLYBIRDS 



Fasten your seat belts I The new adventure set 
"Whirlybirds," is off to the fastest take-off ii 
television: 85 markets sold after only 6 weeks on the market! Advertisers like Continental! 
(47 markets), Lafura Scudder Foods (16 markets), Nabisco (8 markets) are set for immedi 1 
start. "Whirlybirds" is the dramatic story of aviation's most amazing aircraft -'copters - 
of the men who fly them. Now available: 39 adventure- packed half-hours, produced for C 
Television Film Sales by Desilu Productions, creators of some of television's biggest hits, 
flying "Whirlybirds" will bring in solid sales returns. Act fast for the best choice of remain 
markets. For a briefing, contact CBS Television Film Sales, Inc. - New York, Chicago, Bos; 
Los Angeles, Detroit, San Francisco, St. Louis, Dallas, Atlanta. In Canada: S. W. Caldwell, 



IDC 

DO 



■■ij 

m 



rs-i 
For CJ 

Is, J 
ma/nl 

Bos 
4 



ELEVISI 

nun 
;ales,inc: 







tk million 
people... 
every one a 
prospect 







Selling opportunities are rich and ready 
in America's 10th TV market. Its multi- 
city population consists of 3V2 million 
people comprising 989,605 families, 
with a high TV set ownership of 917,320. 
These families earn $5% billion a year, 
spend $3% billiononadvertised products. 

AMERICA'S 10th TV MARKET 









WGAL-TV 

LANCASTER, PENNA. 
NBC and CBS 



CHANNEL 8 

Multi-City Market 



STEINMAN STATION 
Clair McCollough, Pres. 



Representative: The MEEKER Company, Inc. • New York • Los Angeles • Chicago • San Francisco 



8 



SPONSOR • 5 JANUARY 1957 



1/' I ml /i and radio 

n< it \ <./ //,,■ a nl. u u). 
in depth I 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



5 JANUARY 

Copyright 1957 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



This week, as a large share of mankind started think; 
the radio-tv industry was just about balfwaj through the todaj of L95< 

If money alone were the measure of an industry, most broadcaster! could dose 

the ledgers right now and go hunting or skiing. Even network radio wl 

years has been relegated to the same class as buggy whips — has been staging a I. 

But more than money is on the industry's mind. In their swirling world, I idio-ft folk, 
are thinking about: 

TELEVISION: Both network and spot sales are running about 2n' , ahead of th< 
vious season (national spot was a little flutter) at the start, but soon overcame that) I hi 
big rub thus isn't money — it's how to squeeze into the handful of top markets an 
advertiser absolutely must have before he OK's a campaign. Availabilities in these 
key spots are so tight that they are becoming the needle's eye that could stymie the A.'iole 
camel. 

Program-wise, the network season already has been written off as pretty medi- 
ocre. Nor are reports on the future output from the creative centers in New York and Holly- 
wood encouraging. On top of that, there remains the ticklish question of who is responsible 
for high-cost programing to begin with — the agency, the sponsor, the network, or all <>f 
them? The coming months on this front will be nerve-wracking. 

FEATURE FILMS: When the dust from Hollywood's vaults can blow Walter Wincheli 
off the air, there's no telling what a hurricane the post-1949 films (now pried loose) 
will stir up. 

Nobodv is more concerned about this than the networks. NBC alreadv has raised the 
point that the whole philosophy of network operation is at stake. Meantime CBS has 
grabbed off the MGM library for most of its o & o's. And ABC apparently has a sharp 
eye on Paramount's door (currently still closed). 

Film syndicators, on the other hand, aren't complaining about the movies. Their 
own product seems as potent as ever. 

RADIO: The spectacular performance of spot, and the incipient comeback of the net- 
works are sure to carry through this season and beyond. The plain fact thai radtts) is a 
good buy has sunk in. Economics and flexibility are more important here than big rat 

INDUSTRY: As a whole, its very prosperity is forcing the radio-tv industry out of the 
highly personalized, dramatic, and semi-heroic era of the past into the inevitable admint- 
tive era. Sellers (see next page) complain that buyers no longer listen carefully! Bu 
they haven't enough time; and everybody complains about the lack of personnel. 

But on this front, there's a silver lining. Unlike the printed media, which often l»ear the 
cross of an aging family feudalism, the air media still have their youth, widely 'li- 
fted ownership, and an FCC to stoke the fires up when things grow dull. 

CBS Radio is extending its plan for segmented buying to the weekend. 

fn other words, you'll be able to buy as many as 20 different five-minute unit' during 
the course of a weekend. 

This "dispersion" gambit will apply to a host of established programs. 

They include Suspense, Amos V Andy, Indictment, Johnny Dollar. Robert Q. Lewis. 
Galen Drake, Kathy Godfrey, and news periods. 



SPONSOR • 5 JANUARY 1957 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued . 



Here are the latest "firsts" from the tv research mill: 

• Set ownership in < itie< of 500,000 and over hit 90% of saturation in October. I Source: 
Market Research Corp. of America.) 

• On the basis of Nielsen's second November report. ABC TV claims that the number of 
"home hours" of viewing to ABC TV for any one month has gone over the 100-million 
mark. The network defines ''home hours" as the number of average audience home times 
number <»f commercial hours. 



Station reps are moving into the new year with three problems that appear 
particularly frustrating. 

Problem No. 1 is how to sell a tv station's coverage when the adjustments in the 
\CSi£2 formula aren't entirely clear. 

Problem No. 2 is how to cope with the growing tendency among radio stations to allow 
continuing discounts (the maximum discount earned in one year being applied to the next) 
to national advertisers. 

Problem No. 3 is how to handle yet another incipient practice among radio stations — 
extending rate protection over a year, instead of six months. 

SPONSOR-SCOPE checked on Problems 2 and 3 with several leading buyers of air 
media; it finds (a) the practices are still sporadic, and (b) the concessions depend mostly 
on the agency's bargaining power. 

Nothing is more perplexing to a station rep than knowing that a buyer's cov- 
erage figures are radically different from his own — and. moreover, are kept a deep 
secret. 

Most bedeviling of this sect are the buyers of spot for P & G. 

All P & G agencies — there are eight of them — operate from the same set of coverage 
figures; periodically they adjust in unison. 

But what's on the books is so hush-hush that any disclosure of the figures — or 
the formula P & G uses — means instant dismissal. The data can't be shown even to 
people in the same agency working on other accounts. 

It's been that way for about 18 years- — since P & G plotted its own station coverage 
pattern via a seed offer on the Ma Perkins show. 

An interesting footnote to the above sellers' problem — but somewhat on the wistful side 
- is the situation of the veteran station rep vs. the newer, younger timebuyers. 

The generation of timebuyers that the veteran rep grew up with is gone or promoted up- 
stairs. It's not easv for him in his late 40*s or early 50's — to slip into a new comraderie. 



Many magazines now are lifting a leaf from the networks* discount methods: 
They're adding dollar volume discounts to frequency discount*. 

The practice is also spreading among the Sunday supplements. 

The idea is to get advertisers to spread their campaigns over a solid year and ignore 
seasonal fluctuations. The discount levels are geared to make them especially smooth for 
advertisers with multiple products. 

Radio stations are missing out badly on soft goods business opportunities 
for one or both of these reasons: 

• Lack of know-how in merchandising a soft goods spot campaign among department 
-tores and specialty shops. 

• Failure to follow through with the merchandising they promised the advertiser. 
These observations were made to SI'ONSOR-SCOPE by an agency executive who has 

completed a cross-country swing for a soft-goods client. 

His tip to stations: Millions of dollars of soft-goods billings are available to radio if it 
orient- it< pitch t<> the promotional requirements of the field. 

10 SPONSOR • 5 JANUARY 1957 









^ SPONSOR-SCOPE continued . . 

Not.- to networks and freelance producers! ii you've z>>\ ih< right ereal 
touch, you might -nikc some rich paydirl with General Motors. 

Straws in the wind indicate thai General Mol titerested in tl i mid 

impress on tv audiences the company's latest concept in in-iiinii.pn.il advi -I. 

bring the Bmall businessman, particularly if he's in the <-M stable. 

Genera] Motors bas ahead] sel the pattern foi this concept in an ad in tin I la 
issue of Life Magazine. 

I lie genesis of GM's latest tack in advertising is a (simple one: ii has i interact the 

tlireals of court or governmental bust-up bj the goodwill-building route. 

The automotive giant now recognizes thai it must take the curse off bigness bj point 
out that a huge share of the mone) it take, in goes out, in turn, to Borne 20,000 suppliei 
(his country alone. 

In other words, instead ol being an all-devouring octopus, it provides the life blood to 
hundreds of little industries of everj description. 

Kudner i« GM's agenc) for institutional advertising. 

Incidentally, the chit for the Wide, Wide World Series (NB< l\ 
a year. 

W hy are more and more agencies merging? 

SPONSOR-SCOPE probed the top members of some of these totem poles, and w h.it I 
had to say comes down to these basic benefits: 

1) Interchange of specialists, notably in tv where the costs of creative and adm 
trative talent come steep. 

2) Making better use of high-salaried marketing people whose exp< > 
"\er many fields. 

3) Pooling of research efforts. 

4) Reducing clerical expense — maybe even bj installing i • 
(For further comment, see SPONSOR SPEAKS, page 72) 

If what's happened to Weiss »\ Geller the past yeai can I <• taken a- an omen, < hicago 
agencies may be on their way to recouping much of the business that"" wandered 
off elsewhere. 

Weiss & Geller -which is changing it- name to Edward II. Weiss & Companj can ! 
this balance sheet: 

• By the end of 1956 it not only had recaptured — but topped by an additional v 
— the $7 million in hillings it lost with the exit of Toni. 

• Billings for 1956 will run close to SI 4 million. 

• It expects to wind up 1957 with billings of at least $15 million (about v o tniUioi 
for air media). 

Weiss himself is retaining 51'. of the stock and splitting the rot among 11 stockholder 
employees. 

New accounts include Helene Curtis Industries, Purex (Manhattan Soap 1 . k<\ \\ 
and Corina Cigars (a division of General Cigar). Corina has big tv plan- for 1957. 

Too much variety may prove a boomerang for the read] mixes, it the manu- 
facturers keep going at their latest pace. 

The ready-mix business has ju-t had its biggest \ear ever — $200 million, compared with 
$150 million in 1954 — but marketers warn that too many flavors and types can confuse the 
field more than price wars. 

The competition for the ready-mix market has pretty well settled down, and leaders lik-- 
General Mills, Pillsburv, and General Food are starting to make a profit out of the divisi 

Meanwhile P & G is expected to be a force in the field as - firm 

grasp on the food business via its recent purchase of Duncan Hi 

Estimate of ad expenditure for ready mixes in 195 

SPONSOR • 5 JANUARY 1957 11 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued . . . 



Apparently the fan magazines haven't caught up with the revival of network 
radio. 

A check by SPONSOR-SCOPE among the editors of the leading periodicals in that field 
shows they haven't been adding much radio material to their content. 

One editor explained: "We'd probably be the last to respond to an upsurge in radio in- 
terest. The only way we measure an awakening is the relative percentage of reader 
mail. The overwhelming interest — even though it's been a disappointing season program- 
wise — still is tv." 



For smart merchandising of a tv property. Gulf Oil is putting itself into a 
class with Lincoln-Mercury, GE, and Westinghouse. 

The extent and degree that Gulf is using William Bendix, star of The Life of Riley, in 
promotional tieups and dealer contacts easily can compare with the double play that Lincoln- 
Mercury has fashioned with Ed Sullivan. 

As the company's ambassador of goodwill, Bendix is read) at the jingle of a phone to 
traipse off to Gulf sales meetings, plant openings, contest payoffs, etc. 



You ordinarily think of an advertiser taking the alternate sponsor route when 
he wants to lay off a piece of an expensive show. 

But now there's a trend to even smallerpartnerships. You can buy as few as three 
or four telecasts in a 13-week series. 

This is pure expediency. If the original sponsor can't find somebody flush enough to 
pay for half the package, he's ready to whittle it down to what-have-you. 

In most such cases, the original sponsor has more than one show on tv. Note J. B. Wil- 
liams recently picked up several payments on the Phil Silvers Show (CBS TV). General Food 
to date has been able to pick up but one partner for the batch of shows it has on the block 
— Ford re Zane Grey (also CBS TV). 



ASCAP estimates that its take from tv and radio for 1956 will be around SI 5 
millions, or 75% of its take from all licensing sources. 

The ASCAP tv agreement with stations and networks expires 31 December 1957 and 
the one on radio runs a year later. 



Spot radio's man-bites-dog story of the year: 

Adam Young, Inc., reports that over $500,000 in radio billings were turned down by its 
stations during 1956 because of inability to clear time. 

Comments president Adam Young: "The continued growth of spot radio has been 
marked by a chronic shortage of prime availabilities on top independent stations in 
particular." 



Joe Culligan, NBC radio v.p., says the network's batted 1000% on the plans it 
announced four months ago particularly by: 

ll I Wrapping up sponsorship of the Around the Clock News (shared by Bristol-M\ers 
and Brown & Williamson); (2) debuting it 14 Januan and (3) delivering to the sponsors 
a station lineup that represents 75% of the dollar \alue of the sponsors" orders. I See story 
this is>ue. page 23. 1 



For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 5; i\ew 
and Renew, page 54; Spot Buys, page 55; News and Idea Wrap-up, page 56; Washington 
Week, page 61; sponsor Hears, page 64; and Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 68. 



12 



SPONSOR • 5 JANUARY 1957 




----- 



NETWORK 
QUALITY 

at the local level! 





TEXAS PRISON RODEO 



The pageantry and excitement of the annual prison rodeo at Hunts- 
ville, Texas, was viewed by the nation on "Wide W '• World" via the 
staff and through the facilities of KPRC-TV Houston ( r, mc 

and again for network pick-ups of Southwestern events. KPRf 
with 8 years of operating experience, furnishes a complete, highly 
flexible production and engineering facility. You can pave tb 
greater sales in the Houston Gulf Coast area for your clients by u 
KPRC-TV ... the most potent advertising force in the Houston mar- 



KPRC-TV 

HOUSTON 

CHANNEL 2 



KPRC-TV 



JACK HARRIS 

Vice President and General 

FIRST IN EXPERIENCE 



JACK McGREW 

National Sales Mtnu 



Manager 
WITH OVER 900 MAN-YEARS 



EDWARD PETRY 4. CO 




SAt& 



20 




CAM 

HI f TOW- 

PAtNT 

Spots on three Southern California radio 
stations during the normally slow fall 
season boosted National Paint Company 
sales more than 20% over the same 
period last year. 

"This campaign was deliberately sched- 
uled during the normally slow season 
for paint sales," writes Marvin Cantz of 
Tilds & Cantz Advertising. Los Angeles, 
to KBIG. "This gave us the opportunity 
to measure more accurately the effective- 
ness of radio, as one of our principal 
media, for introducing a new advertising 
and selling approach for a paint product. 

"We have just completed a survey among 
all paint dealers and painting contrac- 
tors in Southern California. It was ex- 
tremely encouraging to note that 89% 
indicated an awareness of National 
Paint's new Color-Lok process which we 
introduced only two short months ago. 
And 47% mentioned that they had heard 
National Paint advertising on the radio. 
or were informed by the consumer that 
our message reached them through this 
medium. KBIG was the most frequently 
mentioned station. 

"'The greatest source of satisfaction came 
from Mr. Spellens. President of National 
Paint, who indicates an increase in sales 
of more than 20% over the same period 
last year." 

KBIG is happy to share with two other 
fine Los Angeles independent stations 
gratification for another job well done 
in our long list of successful Southern 
California radio advertisers. 




JOHN POOLE BROADCASTING CO. 

6540 Sunset Blvd.. Los Angeles 28. California 
Telephone' Hollywood 3 3705 

Nat. Rep. WEED and Company 



I I 






Timebuyers 
at work 




Ed Ratner, Friend-Reiss. New York, thinks the bu\er should care- 
fully study the following when visiting a tv market: ill Local cus- 
toms, habits and prejudices. "For example, in preparing a cam- 
paign for the Toy Guidance Council, we knew from past experience 
that one of the best times to establish contact with the familv audi- 
ence with voting children was on 
Sunday mornings. Despite good 
ratings on mam stations in a 
Southern market, personal re- 
search showed tremendous antipa- 
th\ to Sunday morning tv amongst 
a church-going familv audience. 
Advertising would not only miss 
this group, but might create ill- 
will. (2) Dealer appraisal. "If 
the dealer does not approve of the 
advertising, he will not push the 
product." (3) The influence of 
local personalities. "Two competing shows in a time slot I liked 
each had 8.5 ratings. I chose the program with a local personalis 
because my personal investigation showed him to have a strong 
loval personal following." I 4 1 The caliber of the stations produc- 
tion know-how when integrating film and live commercials. "The 
commercial's impact, is increased b\ efficient station execution." 



Doris Could, C. J. LaRoche. New York, thinks that the children's 
market is one of the most difficult to reach because each age group 
has highly individual tastes and habits. "The buyer must spread 
hi> budget to cover kiddie shows, rock r n roll, and Roy Rogers and 
Sheena of the Jungle type fare."" Doris says. "Budget allowance for 

area, time and program must be 
influenced considerably b\ previ- 
ous sales and age data." Doris 
says the basis of all good selling 
psychology is: listener sees, listen- 
er buys. But. the younger child 
must ask his mother to buy the 
product for him. "M5 ben there is 
no direct action, the sale is some- 
times lost," she emphasizes. Doris 
believes that the older child, who 
has an allowance or is working, 
offers the best sales potential when 
the product has appeal to children of all ages. "Local personalities 
make powerful salesmen, and are an important merchandising plus. 
>lic says. "1 also look for special situations which enable me to con- 
tact a broad age group, such as a spot availability between a kiddie 
show and a sports feature.'" Doris has bought adjacencies of this 
type throughout the country with tremendous results for the client. 




SPONSOR 



r> JANUARY 195' 




1 In Washington consumei market is zooming ahead 
ai a remarkable rate. In just five years, population has 
increased 21%. At the same time total retail sales have 
shot up 37%, (o a whopping J2.31 1,000,000 foi 1956. 

Advertisers have spotted the D. C. market as a kej area 
for their selling efforts. And the) have turned in ever- 
in< reasing numbers to the two media thai sell Washington 
best-WRC and WRC 1 V. 

WRG and WRC-TV, Washington's Leadership Stations, 



show an i>n rease in ad\ 

the same (i\l years, 1951 t<> I 

Ml the nu mix is mean jusi ilii> more advcrtiv i- an 
ing in the Washington area, and more and mon "I them 
are turning to WRC and \VR( I \ foi ilts. 

It's a simple story, but a stor) ol pi inn importance to \nu. 
II you want to move youi product into mon H ishington 
homes, mov< forward with ilu bi n\ in tlu Wash- 

ington selling boom— 



WRCandWRC-TV 



.sold by |XBC|SPOT SAILS 

VUF.RSHIP STATIONS IN WASHINGTON, D. C. 








Start Out 
1957 

with assured results 
from your advertising 
dollar 

KPQ 

WENATCHEE, WASH. 

will give you coverage in 
that big central Washington 
area. 

Central Washington enjoyed 
an enviable, healthy growth 
during 1956 with even bigger 
things planned for 1957. New 
dams, new highways, new in- 
dustrial plants, new farms, new 
homes .... A BIGGER, 
RICHER MARKET THAN 
EVER AWAITS YOU. And 
KPQ's audience is captive be- 
cause of the mountain ranges 
separating centfraj Washing- 
ton from other northwest cities. 

INVESTIGATE CENTRAL 

WASHINGTON 

THEY BUY KPQ, 

WENATCHEE 



/"n 





5000 watt: 

560 K.C. 

WENATCHEE 

WASHINGTON 



PORTLAND & SEATTLE REPS 
Art Moore and Associates 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

Forjoe and Co., Incorporated 

(One of the Big 6 Forjoe Represented 
Stations of Washington State) 



L6 



by Bob Foreman 



Agency ad libs 




i Euclid A. Parabolo sums up 1956 

Euclid \. Parabolo, research head of the 
Snook. Crappie Si Bream agency, was addressing 
the \d-Crafters Club of Tenafly, New Jersey. 
His talk had been billed as — Retrospective 
Seminar on Research. 1956 — and "Eukie" was 
regaling the customers with some of the bench- 
marks of the past broadcast season. 

"Let us review, for example, the much-dis- 
cussed, oft-misunderstood Quintile Study," be said adjusting his 
pince nez with one hand and reaching for a piece of chalk with the 
other. Tenafly's ad-crafters leaned forward eagerly. 

"The Quintile stud) was made in behalf of radio which is another 
wav of saving il was made to knock television specifically daytime 
tv. According to this tract, the trouble with daytime television is 
that it concentrates viewing among the top two quintiles. 

10% of the viewers do 80% of the viewing 

"Let me explain." said "Kukie." "'If \ <>u take all the viewers of 
daytime and arrange them in consecutive order from those who do 
the most listening down to those who do the least and then separate 
this progression into five equal groups. \ou discover that the two 
top groups — those which do the most viewing — account for more 
than 80% of all the television viewing during the daylight hours. 
Another way of putting this is that 60% of the viewers do only 
209? °f the viewing. A fly in the ointment! Hut is it? 

"Let us now examine dav time radio," "Eukie" went on. "Aston- 
ishingly, \ou find the same thing is true. However, does this neces- 
sarik cast aspersions on either medium'.'' I strongly doubt it. 
fellow ad-crafters. because lets look at those top two quintiles in tv. 

At this point "Kukie" took a sip of water. '"Who eompri-e- 
them'.''"" he continued. "We find tbev are the younger housewives. 
We find that tbev are the ones with the most children. What a 
wonderful market to be able to concentrate on.'" He brought his 
fist to the tabletop with a Demosthenian thump. 

"Nexl of import."" said "Eukie" Parabolo. "is I believe the fact 
that all of us. researchers as well as lav men. have finally had suffi- 
cient evidence and acumen to disregard the Remembrance Quo- 
tient tvpe of commercial testing. We now recognize that recall of 
copj ideas is not necessarily a criterion of sales-success. In fact. 
the antithesis mav well be the case. A poorlj remembered com- 
mercial, it ha- been shown, mav be the real blockbuster. Whether 
it achieved il- -ales-abilit v via an emotional rapport with viewers 
or merelv that viewers were unable to re-State what tbev remem- 
bered during the testing is immaterial." 

"Eukie" replaced his glasses. 

■"Third. I believe, we are on the track of some vital statistics if- 



SPONSOR 



.1 .1 \\i \\{\ l').~i, 



y*i 



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JUDGMENT 

No decision can be sounder than the 
facts on which it is based. 

Your business is to decide when and 
where to buy. Ours is to help... by giving 
you the facts. Facts on markets, pro- 
gramming, ratings, competitive media... 
all so clearly and convincingly presented 
that you can act not only quickly but 
wisely. 



AVERY-KNODEL 

INCORPORATED 



NEWYORK ATLANTA DALLAS DETROIT SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES CHICAGO 



Agency ad libs continued.., 




IS altimore 



is so easy 

to reach 

when you ride 

with 



r : ;: I 1 1 1 1 






MIIHI 



REPRESENTED BY 



JOHN BLAIR AND CO. 



li! 



garding the added virtues in surrounding tv copy with a company- 
sponsored show thus justifying the many millions invested in talent 
costs, the risks in purchasing a show versus the buying of pure- 
circulation. I use the word 'pure' loosely/' said "Fukie." tossing a 
researcher's smile at this rapt audience. 

"Fourth. I think we have uncovered main new areas which go to 
prove you can't research your way out of creative problems which 
is a way of saying you can't rely on numbers to urile good copy. 

"F'rinstance, one of our leading Digit Merchants asserts cate- 
gorically that jingles and animation are the most assured technique- 
of no-sale copy. His competitor speaks highly of some commer- 
cials which utilize these forms of aesthetic endeavor. 

"The more program-in-advance research we see. the more cer- 
tain we are that it is tenuous, fallacious, stifling, and infuriating. 
A panacea to those devoid of judgment and a crutch to the courage- 
less. I recall how our best-by-far episode in an anthology series 
was condemned to failure by our own particular Pre-Test Swami. 

"Finally," said "Eukie," "I daresay we are going to see more of 
a pattern which nose-counting revealed to us this season. That 
some shows will get a higher Trendex than Nielsen, attesting to the 
fact that television has in reality become a national medium and 
that in some cases big-city tastes run counter to those of the folks 
in the rest of the country." 

"Fukie" regained his seat on the dais to thunderous applause. ^ 



TV-RADIO RESEARCH, OR, HOW ONE 
MANS MEAT IS ANOTHER'S QUINTILE 

For those non-Digit Merchants who don t know a 
Quintile from their elbow (and. of course, we're not 
referring to you i . the study Bob Foreman is talking 
about can be found on page 224 of sponsor's 1956 
Fall Facts Basics issue and on page 9 of the 1956 
Radio Basics reprint. It is an analysis of afternoon 
radio-tv tuning based on Nielsen data and was used 
by CBS Radio as ammunition for the web s successful 
daytime sales drive. A similar study of morning tun- 
ing, done for CBS Radio, was not made public. 
Quintile studies have also been made by Nielsen on 
tv viewing alone for TvB. The quintile studies empha- 
size that, during the day. some homes account for a 
lot of l\ viewing and not so much radio listening 
while oilier homes account for a lot of radio listening 
and not so much tv viewing. This should surprise 
nobody except perhaps, that the contrast is more 
marked in the case of t\ viewing. It might be pointed 
out. however, that radio needed to emphasize the facts 
of this studv to the public more than television did. 



urn 



SPONSOR 



5 JANUARY 195' 




ween 

SPONSOR and ADVERTISING AGEI 



FOR SELECTING US THE YEARS BEST 

TELEVISION COMMERCIAL PRODUCERS OF 1956 

(as chosen by a panel of top advertising copywriters) 




SPONSOR 



5 JANUARY 1957 



19" 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 
IN CALIFORNIA 

The Mexican- 
American population 
of Greater 
Los Angeles is 
about the same 
as the total 
population of 
New Hampshire 

NEW HAMPSHIRE .... 560,000 

MEXICAN-AMERICANS 

IN LOS ANGELES 550,000 

This is why KWKW Spanish 

Speaking Market is a 
Must for Sponsors like these: 



REGAL PALE 
LUCKY STRIKE 
WRICLEY'S CUM 
EX LAX 
7-UP 

|. J. NEWBERRY 
A-l PILSNER 
CARNATION MILK 
CHOOZ 

FOLGERS COFFEE 
COCA COLA 
ITALIAN SWISS 
COLONY WINE 

MAYTAG 



EASTSIDE 

|. C PENNEY CO. 

CAMELS 

CHEER 

LYDIA PINKHAM 

PEPSI COLA 

BURCERMEISTER 

WHITE KING SOAP 
CO. 

QUAKER OATS 

REYNOLDS TOBACCO 
CO. 

HILLS BROS. COFFEE 

FEENAMINT 

COCOMALT 



49th and 
Madison 



You can reach ALL 
550,000 through one station! 




50 top agencies 

In \our report on the top agencies 
current \ears tv and radio activities 
\ou note that K&E (which ranks 10th 
in the nation I is one of the few agen- 
cies placing more than 50% of its 
total billing in broadcast advertising. 
It might he of interest to point out 
that some of the account activity to 
which we attribute our over $1 million 
gain in broadcast billing includes the 
acquisition of the following new cli- 
ents in 1956 I which you omitted men- 
tion of I : Blatz. Lever Bros.. Spry, 
Pepsi Cola: and the fact that tv activit) 
was stepped up by placing Whirlpool- 
Seeger in the convention package last 
fall and in the NBC TV spectaculars. 
Incidentally, Jack and the Beanstalk 
got one of the highest ratings of any 
network 90-minute show. and. in a fall 
Nielsen listing of the Top 10 Shows. 
we found that K&E had three of the 
first five: Ed Sullivan for Lincoln- 
Mercury was No. One. and Perry 
Como and Producers' Showcase for 
RCA and Whirlpool-Seeger were No. 
Four and Five respective!) . 

George Cadenas. 

K&E promotion dept.. New York- 



Radio audience increase 
We were pleased to see the item 
"Radio listening continues to rise both 
day and night" in the December 15 
SPONSOR-SCOPE, and at first we 
were amazed at the prescience of pre- 
dicting 1957 figures, until we realized 
of course that these were the 1955 
figures demonstrating the morning 
radio audience increase in 1956. Look- 
ing more carefully at the figures we 
note that the same printers gremlin 
showed for the 9-10 am audience the 
figure for the 9-10 pm audience, thus, 
instead of 4.523.000 homes tuned from 
9 to 10 am the correct figure for 
September 1956 is 6,714.000. 

I think it important to realize that 
these Nielsen figures show homes 
tuned to radio per-average-minute — 
the cumulative morning audience is 
of course much higher. 

Incidentally, one reason we are 
pleased to see industry recognition of 



radios stability and particularly in 
the morning where ABC has been the 
dominant network in Nielsen ratings 
over the past main months, is that the 
average audience-per-minute for our 
morning dramas in September 1956 
was also above that of a year ago. 
Dean Shaffner. director sales 
development and research. ABC Radio 

Let's modernize radio ratings 
I read with disma\ your article en- 
titled "Let's Modernize Radio Ratings" 
written b\ Mr. Ward Dorrell and ap- 
pearing in your December 8th issue 
Evidently, Mr. Dorrell's concept of 
radio today is that of a "Background 
Music medium only, and he has over- 
looked the fact that there are still ra- 
dio operations whose programing i* of 
higher quality than mere '"Top 35 
Records"' interspersed with some '"Per- 
sonality's" chit-chat I that really isn't 
usually very funny l and with a "Tear 
and Read" newscast on the hour. I 
don't doubt Mr. Dorrell's knowledge 
of ratings and statistics, but I do doubt 
his belief in radio toda\ . 

According to Mr. Dorrell. network 
radio is dead and no longer produces 
any top ratings. This is simply not 
true in most cases. According to him. 
too, all buying is done in blocks with 
no concern to any particular quarter- 
hour. He glibly speaks of buyers pur- 
chasing "hundreds of spots per week 
rather than dozens." Frankly, though 
our particular station does quite well 
in national spot billing, we have vet to 
receive our first order of 100 spots per 
week, let alone hundreds . . . 

To sum up, Mr. Dorrell evident!) 
only recognizes the "Quantity" in the 
radio business today and forgets there 
is still "Quality ." thinking it to be 
an old fashioned idea. Articles that 
appeared five or so years ago under 
the byline of various prophets of doom 
for radio didn't realK hurt, but arti- 
cles like Mr. Dorrell's. coming from a 
man who is presumed to be a pro- 
ponent of radio, do. 

F. A. Watkins. Jr. 

assistant manager. KWKH 

Shreveport. La. 



SPONSOR 



5 J VNl.'ARY 1957 



iio 



mowm 

TWO BIG 



radio stations 



Southwest Markets! 



ot 4E low co Sr 

tofMwfo* ' ate P*hi M 







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THE KENYON BROWN STATIONS 

Now undtr on t owntrship and ma n a gt mt ni 



National Representatives JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



SPONSOR • 5 JAM ARY l')^ 







In any of these 5 important markets . . . 

you talk to the big audiences with the "Storz Station! " 



MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL . . . with YVDCY It's 

very nearly unanimous. Hooper, Nielsen, Pulse and a 
host of Twin Cities advertisers agree: WDGY has the 
big audience for those big results! See John Blair or 
WDGY GM Steve Labunski. 

OMAHA . . . with KOWH Now in its sixth year of 
first place dominance. Latest Hooper — 47.7%. First on 
latest Pulse and latest Trendex, in all time periods. 
Contact Adam Young Inc. or KOWH General Man 
ager Virgil Sharpe. 



KANSAS CITY . . . with WHB First per Hooper, 
first per Area Nielsen, first per Area Pulse, first per 
Metro Pulse. 87% renewal rate among Kansas City's 
biggest advertisers proves dynamic sales power. See 
John Blair or WHB GM George W. Armstrong. 

NEW ORLEANS . . . with W7/X Still rocketing, 
still in first place, with increasing margins all the time, 
per latest Hooper. And wait 'til you see that newest 
Pulse. Ask Adam Young Inc. or WTIX GM Fred 
Berthelson. 



MIAMI . . . with WQAM It's happened! In less 
than 3 months of "Storz Station" programming, 
WQAM has leaped to first in the morning (26.6% 
average share) . . . afternoon (32.6%) . . . and all da) ! 
Covering all of Southern Florida with 5,000 watts on 
560 kc. See John Blair or WQAM GM Jack Sandler. 



The Storz Stations; 

Today's Radio for Today's Selling \ 



TODD STORZ, 

President 



22 



SPONSOR 



5 JANI \KV 195' 



^i RO M *i OR 



78 of time is cleared h 

NBC affiliates have already cleared 
7890 of tin- weekl) newscasts sched- 
uled for year. This exceeds guarantee 
extended to the sponsors, Bristol- 
Myers and Brown 8 Williamson 




4 22 of time is problem 

Mosl po| 

ni e probli 
larlj 7:1 
10:00-1 1 :00 p.m. Many 

n|i| , 



WILL NBC RADIO SCORE 
ITS GREATEST COUP? 

It set out to clear 826,5 10 five-minute segments for it- 
news plan. The big problem: station economies 



w 



here is network radios niche? 

Before television it was a medium 
which drew its revenue from sale of 
programs to a relative handful of ad- 
vertisers, delivering substantial audi- 
ences for each program. It was an 
inflexible medium, as contrasted with 
spot radio, for the advertiser had to 
make long-range commitments and 
could not pick and choose markets to 
anv substantial extent. 

today network radio has changed 
radically under the impact of audience 
and advertiser losses to television. It 
no longer can sell the mass audiences 
of single programs. Instead it sells 
what it has — big cumulative audiences 
at low cost. It has become flexible— 



allowing short-term buys; giving ad- 
vertisers the opportunity t" purchase 
partial networks; providing the oppor- 
tunity to buj announcements in bulk. 
In short, network radio has moved 
ever closer in its charactei to spol 
radio. 

Because of the economic nature of 
the network-affiliate relationship, con- 
troversj has accompanied ever) 
in the network 1 adio e\ olution. I he 
network affiliate has been caught in a 
squeeze. His revenue from network 
radio has shrunk. \t the same time 
ever) move taken 1>\ the networks 
salvage their position has inevitabl) 
meant competition with the station for 
the ver\ national spot business which 



has be> ome the statioi - 
mainstay. Spol radio revenue, with the 
ption of 1955, has continued to 
since thi tl of 

tele* ision. 

The station represent itii es hai • 
sistentl) led in the attack on the 
work- for their "encroachment* on 
radio pi \n\ veteran of 

the bush I- the furoi over the 

firsl network flexibility plans. M'-' - 

.mid Plan. ' BS P 
MBS' Multi-M ssage Plan, NB< - 
eration Tandem were all in: 
which brought forth a howl of pi 
from stations and reps who felt their 
imii well-lx - • red. 

The advertiser i- not aloof from the 



SPONSOR 



5 JANUARY 1957 






NETWORK "NEWS PLAN" continued 



conflict. He is concerned, first of all. 
fvith evaluating the merits and de- 
merits of spot vs. network radio. He is 
concerned, too, with radio's economic 
well-being. The medium is important 
to him and if it continues to be strong 
then he is insured of continued returns 
from advertising in it. 

The latest step in network radio's 
evolution has perhaps more direct 
bearing on advertisers than any other 
because it is a sweeping and dvnamic 
change in network radio operation 
affecting virtually all of the pre-mid- 



night broadcasting day. This is NBC 
Radio's news plan which will put a 
five-minute segment of news on the air 
from 7 a.m. to 1 1 p.m., displacing 
existing spot radio and local radio 
sponsors in the non-network hours. 
The plan offers advantages and dis- 
advantages to stations which the affili- 
ates have been weighing over the 
weeks since it was announced by 
NBC's vigorous new radio v. p., Mat- 
thew J. Culligan. To present an objec- 
tive report on the pros and cons of 
the plan from the viewpoint of radio's 



NBC stresses added prestige 

Prestige programing like on-the-spot news coverage by top NBC 
correspondents will enhance the value of the adjacent local programing 
and add to the station's stature in its market. The added prestige will soon 
bring results in extra revenue to the station, say NBC Radio executives 

"Hot-line" news flashes will encourage throughout-the-day listening, 
and will develop a near-captive audience for stations carrying the 
package. If stations follow the NBC newscasts with their own local 
and regional coverage, says NBC, they'll attract more spot business 

Commercial time within the newscasts themselves is under the code, 
according to the network, and won't keep local station from selling adja- 
cencies. Major client gets one minute, minor, 30 seconds. The open- 
ing and closing billboards, required by FCC, aren't commercial time 

Additional Station revenue will accrue partly from the 7.5% 
revenue increase for which NBC provides, partly from the net's "no waste" 
policy. The latter throws open to local sales network participations not 
sold nationally, plus an extra minute within network chainbreak time 




economics, sponsor spoke at length 
with NBC, with NBC affiliates and 
with station representatives. 

This was the situation at presstime. 
On 14 Januarv NBC Radio network 
will definitely go on the air with its 
news plan, which has been sold to 
Bristol-Myers and Brown & William- 
son on an alternating-day basis. Sta- 
tion clearances, which loomed large 
among possible stumbling blocks to 
the program's success, were coming in 
at a better rate than anticipated, 
according to NBC executives. By year- 
end, NBC had clearance for 78% of 
the potential time periods involved — 
that is, 644,701 time periods cleared 
out of a total of 826,540. (These fig- 
ures were arrived at by multiplying 85 
weekly potential newscasts by' 52 
weeks for the year, by 187 NBC affili- 
ates in continental U.S.) 

Some of the most desirable station- 
option times were expected to be hard 
to clear, such as early morning, noon, 
late afternoon and late evening. Ac- 
cording to NBC Radio's Joe Culligan, 
the problem areas to-date have been 
long-established contracts in the fol- 
lowing times: 7:00-8:00 a.m., noon, 
6:00 p.m. and 10:00-11:00 p.m. How- 
ever, he points out that clearances 
already exceed the dollar volume 
guaranteed in the NBC contracts with 
the two advertisers who've bought the 
package. 

Manv station reps, who represent 
NBC affiliates, feel that stations clear- 
ing their most valuable times for the 
network will be cutting into their spot 
revenue beyond the actual loss from 
selling those periods locally. 

"Any station clearing for these 
newscasts is likely to lose a lot of 
national spot dollars adjacent to 
them," a major rep sales manager told 
sponsor. "In the first place, two 
major categories of advertisers will be 
excluded from buying adjacencies 
right from the start for competitive 
reasons. Secondly, we don't consider 
these network newscasts half so de- 
sirable as adjacencies as local news- 
easts, and expect to find them harder 
to sell.'" 

These were some of the other issues 
under consideration: 
• Local vs. national news: — News 



International news, 1'ke NBC's inter- 
view with Chou En-lai (left) can best be 
handled by network correspondents, says NBC 



J9 



has u! course, become a majoi | >« • 1 1 i ■ ► 1 1 

• > I local Btation programing. Ii b one 
that main broadi asters feel the) can 
handle bettei than a network. 

"Local and regional news have the 
big am I ifii. i- appeal, ' said a rep 9ales 
manager who represents I" NBC affili- 
ates. "People aren't interested enough 
in national and international events to 
listen to them more than once or twice 
a ,1 a\ . There'll be a lot of ine\ itable 
repetition that will drive audience 
awaj ." 

Commented an affiliate in a major 
market: "Where will NBC get its 
news? From the local station in the 
last analysis. When there isn't any- 
thing goini: on in Suez, they'll be 
using the local station's news Facilities 
to cover regional events, which the 
elation would normally cover itself. 

\B('"s Joe C.ulligan. on the othei 
hand, sees tlie network news coverage 
as a strong audience-puller. "\\ e II 
have big-name NBC correspondents 
reporting on-the-spot news in areas 
that no individual station could afford 
to cover," he told sponsor. " \nd we 

recommend that the individual station- 
follow up our program with their own 
regional and local news. Our newscasts 
will invite continued listening. The 
newsman will say 'Stay tuned to your 
Mil. station for your next hot-line 
broadcast and news on the hour.' 
There'll be a timeliness and immediacy 
about the coverage that the wire serv- 
ice handouts cant provide. \nd. 
necessarily, our stations will benefit 
through added prestige in their own 
market and hence added value to their 
over-all lineup."' 

• Commercial time: In a memo to 
it- members, the Station Represent- 
atives Association recentlv protest,, I 
the "breaking down of all the rules 
and regulations governing commercial 
portions of a newscast, implicit in 
NBC's time allotted to the "major" 
and "minor"' sponsors of the NBC 
news package. 

v li \ said live-minute newscasts have 
been sold by most stations on the 
following basis: 1:15 minutes ot com- 
mercial time: 3:45 minutes of news, 
with enough time out of the five- 
minute segment for a station break 
which is sold to an advertiser other 



Local news, like cat crash (right), has 
biggest audience appeal, -av critics. Network 

ran't do such reporting as well as stations 



than tie of the n i 

\ll( '. plan ■ rill nds SR \ 

difficult foi ' I ■ station to sell 

-iiice the program it 
loaded w ith i ommercials. 

However, i ulligan points oul 
mercial time provided foi by the 

\ MilK i.eii Ie i- a< tuallv a 

-, , ond openi 10 -• > ond i losing bill- 
board, plus 1:15 minutes a< tual • 

er< ial w iihin the broadcast. 

"\\ e |'i,.\ nl, foi fai Ie- « than thai : 
\\ e w III have a Bimple identifii ation 
opening in a< i ordani e with I ' ' 



■ 
< ommen ial t 

station- who Mill 

lot of |! 

phis the lew in,. 

ill) ." 
turn to : 



Reps see station spot loss 

Adjacencies will suffer, thi 

that pull the Budiem e, not 
Thej feel thai n 
often to warrant 17 newscasts. Repetition will 

Too much commercial time within nei 
to -ell adjai enl timi to i ,i Bpol ad • 

closing billboards, NBC i- violating thi 
ning the medium h> making 

Cheap price 

value of the -t.ition'- time. I!\ quoting ■ blai 
putting early-morning time on a par with mid-mon 
ami with peak i\ viewing time, which i- unfaii 

Encroachment on station-option tin in wit 

plan." sa] reps. M.nn fear that lime periods, lil 
late afternoon, which stations buill up with i 
motion will now !»■ taken over l>v netwoi 





Engaging 



vounji'ster 



5, eye-catching costumes give The Children s Hour \ isual appeal on the t\ portion 



CAN KID TALENT SHOWS 

BUILD A MASS AUDIENCE? 

Horn & Hardart outranks network shows in pulling audiences for 

two-market simulcast which has had the same format for 30 years 




Suburban 

the newest 



26 



food shops, eating places is 
move l>v Horn & Hardart 



^^an a children's talent show, be- 
labored by the rash of similar pro- 
gram offerings which crop out on the 
airwaves, be distinguished enough to 
gain a superior rating? In the long 
history of small ones performing in- 
eptly in front of a microphone or cam- 
era, no sponsor has more of a posithe 
answer to this than Horn & Hardart. 

It has sponsored such a program, 
The Children s Hour, on radio for 30 
years and on television for eight, car- 
rying a simulcast of the amateur hour 
with youngsters in New York and 
Philadelphia. A strict adherence to 



quality in performance and produc- 
tion, and a high regard for the intelli- 
gence of youngsters, has given the 
sponsor a unique franchise on the time 
of listeners and viewers. 

Tvpical of the continuing radio and 
tv reaction among audiences is a 1950 
record-setting report. In that year, 
when Milton Berle was riding high as 
tv's top banana on the Texaco Star 
Theatre, his competition for biggest 
audience in the New "l ork area was 
The Children's Hour. No. 2 in viewer 
preference. 

Todav. high ratings are standard on 



SPONSOR 



5 JANI \RV 195' 



tilt* radio U well a- the h vei-nm- "I 

the hour-long show, aired on WRl \ 
\M and WRCA-T\ in New York and 
on WCAl '-AM and WCAl -T\ in 

Philadelphia. In New York, the aver- 
age wrckK t\ audience numbers L.3 
million families, in which some 189! 
of the \ iewers are adults. 

The program in December, accord- 
ing to a Pulse sur\e\, gained a Id'. 
share of audience in New York be- 
tween 10:30 and 11:30 a.m., when all 
-even local stations were on the air. 
It's the highest rated t\ show Sundays 
before 1 a.m., and gains an average 
rating of 7.2. according to Pulse fig- 
ures. David S. Roberts, treasurer of 
The Clements Co., Philadelphia adver- 
tising agency, and account executive 
On Horn & Hardart. reports that both 
tv and radio audiences have always 
been "unusualU high." 

rl&H in actualit) is two companies. 
Horn & Hardart Co., New York, and 
Horn & Hardart Baking Co., Philadel- 
phia, both of which supply a network 
of 182 retail outlets from a central 
food commissarv in Philadelphia. Each 
company, operating within its immedi- 
ate metropolitan area, services two 
types of units: (1) retail food shops, 
in which some 300 assorted food items 
are sold, and (2) Automat-cafeterias 
and restaurants. 

Radio and tv cop) sell both the eat- 
in and take-out food angles. The t\ 
portion of The Children's Hour, in ad- 
dition, offers food specials each week. 
Results are measured immediately in 
sales gains as contrasted with normal 
movement of the item. T) pica] of the 
effectiveness of the advertising is the 
sale of whipped cream puffs one week 
in New i ork. The average weekly 



ARTICLE IN BRIEF 

East Coast Automat-cafeteria restau 
rant and food shop operator, Horn & 
Hardart, spends $290,000 yearly, 75°o 
of budget, on broadcast media in two 
cities. Bluest part goes to simul 
cast of kid's talent show which has 
been on radio 30 years, on tv eight 

Bale was 9, earn puffs Mt.-i < 

-ingl<- In... hi. a-i mention, the unit 
the followinj week was 39,000 

ll\ll pays the full tab on the bom. 
long radio version bui co-sponsors the 
t\ program (the New ^oik segment 
i- in the process ol being Bold, and 
Philadelphia - Becond half-houi is 
sponsored bj PI) mouth > . < lommei • 
cials are different for radio and tt 
audience- and are handled bj different 
announcers. \h>-t ..f the copj is 
straight sell bul there is secondary in- 
stitutional mention in the radio ver- 
sion of the -bow which Btresses "less 
work for mothei 

Neither the radio show (on the air 
in Philadelphia .'?n years, in New V>ik 
27 i nor the tv program (telecast since 
1948 in Philadelphia, since 1949 in 
New York) has veered from the orig- 
inal program concept or pattern de- 
veloped b\ Mrs. Mice Clement-, presi- 
dent of The Clements agenc] . 

The Children's Hour kick- oil a 
week-Ion- radio effort in each (it\. 
says Roberts. Radio and tv. in com- 
bination, gel 7.V. of the sponsoring 
companies total advertising budget. 
This amounts to some $290,000, of 

which between $90,000 and $100,000 

pays for The Children's Hour. I he 
remaindei goes to radio, usually live-. 



10 

on WCAl ii i U R 

In t. 

Veil 
\\ . 

m lib a ■ ombin ition of l< 

infon ed bj i adio \\ . 

nique oi 

peieiuii.il interest in 

we know bj .un\' 

urea that about half of 

i- adult men and we: 

I be -imiili ,i-t in m turn, 

i- reinfon ed bj the i <t which 

extends from Mondaj thi 
Weekdays and morning bom- ,irr ytr 
fei red bo ause I lot n i 1 1 
to reach adults bel n thi 

and women before they ll • 

Some -pot announcement! 
supplements to the m 

Hut the m tin vehii Ii i h ill 

continue to be, the -imu 

i. in- -e|,-< ted from hundreds of 
plii ations in the two big metropo 
areas. Il\ll knows then 
basic appeals in it- format It sele t- 
children who aren't r show* 

o|f\. who are welcome in 

home"; kid- who have talent, in the 

ln-t place, and who can back it up 
h ith personality and attrai tiveni 
[he children are presented against the 
background of original settii 
are en« ouraged to be natural bj the 
adeptness of the two m-< .'-. Ed Hi rlihj 

in New N • • i k and Stanll I in 

Philadelphia. Herlih) has i ondu 
the program 17 yi I follnw- the 

onlj two other- ever appearing on the 
-bow : Paul 1 1 Ralpl 

ward-. ^ 




Agency president Alice Clements stressing qual- 
ii> performance, has held reins on The Children's 
Hour with Buccess for close to three decades 




Director B ient- 

agen< \ hei ks performani • 
show with two of the 




Big-name 

the show include 



I. and 
with m 



Chorus line 



DO RATING HYPOS HE LI 




says Gordon B. McLendon, who heads up KLIF, 
Dallas, but don't expect giveaways to have an immediate effect 
on ratings. They have a long-range value in station promotion 



hat did our recent huge give- 



"W 

away do to KLIF ratings? 

In November, before the big Trea- 
sure Hunt (in which the station gave 
$50,000 away to a single winner), 
Hooper showed KLIF with 39.9% of 
the morning audience in Dallas and 
40.9% of the afternoon audience. Our 
December figures, taken during this 
$50,000 debacle, show KLIF with 
39.1% of the morning audience, a de- 
crease of nearly 1%, and 47.9% after- 
noons, about a 7% increase. We be- 
lieve we'd have had this same small 
afternoon increase without the Trea- 
sure Hunt since we had effected some 
other afternoon program changes that 
made us normally anticipate an in- 
creased share, and we dropped slight- 
ly in the morning despite the $50,000! 

I should like to distinguish between 
legitimate and illegitimate promotions. 
I could not and would not defend dis- 
honest promotions which offer prizes 
to listeners for falsely stating that thev 
have been or are listening to any sta- 
tion. Stations employing such devices 
should be put off the air. 

We can prove beyond any question 
that most giveaways no longer have 
any appreciable direct or short-run 
effect on local station ratings. We 
know that a network giveaway like the 
$64,000 Question draws big ratings 
but even so these ratings are due to 
its entertainment value since the audi- 
ence can have no expectation of re- 
ward. \\ r do nut liclit'\e am local 
radio giveaways directl) stimulate au- 
dience to any great extent. Perhaps 



the novelty of entering such contests 
has worn off for a large share of the 
audience. Too many people have en- 
tered station contests and have not 
won. These local station contests and 
giveaways still have indirect, long-run 
value to the station — but not value be- 
cause of sudden increases in ratings. 

Our station in Milwaukee, WRIT, 
climbed at or near the top in Hoop- 
eratings and made notable Pulse gains 
— this in spite of Wisconsin's asi- 
nine laws which virtually forbid con- 
tests of any description. Our station 
in San Antonio, KTSA, maintains a 
solid first place position in both Pulse 
and Hooper and yet for the past four 
months KTSA has had few giveaway 
contests. I can give you endless strik- 
ing examples — the newest is WQAM 
which bounced to the top in Miami 
Hooper in 90 days with no giveaways 
or contests at all. 

So, you say, if local contests and 
giveaways do not directly increase 
audience, why have them? The value 
of most contests to us is that, first. 
they stimulate talk, and second, lend 
an atmosphere of excitement and spar- 
kle to the station. Even though the 
listener may not enter the contest or 
giveaway he is interested in the out- 
come and, as a result, not only talks 
about the station, but also, perhaps 
subconsciously, is impressed by the 
station's aliveness. We believe that, 
even though some stations lead bv 
large margins without such contests 
and giveaways, they could increase 
llieir over-all general margin in share 



of audience b\ promotions I of which 
contests are but one type). Mind you, 
I didn't say they could increase their 
share of audience for one period or 
one month, but, perhaps, show quar- 
terly and yearly increases in share of 
audience. 

Promotions have numerous collat- 
eral values. In Milwaukee, where at 
least three stations aggressively pro- 
mote radio, morning sets-in-use have 
crawled to 18.8 and afternoons to 14.1, 
according to Hooper. Compare Mil- 
waukee to some stagnant markets 
where Hooper shows sets-in-use be- 
low 10%. 

Nor is the argument valid that pro- 
motions detract from attention to com- 
mercials. To say this is to say that 
anything overly-entertaining dilutes at- 
tention and. of course, entertainment 
is the very lifeblood of radio. During 
our $50,000 promotion, we tested this 
out with six of our sponsors. All in 
all, they reported results from their 
announcements to be about the same 
during the Treasure Hunt as before. 

Promotions are not short-run hypos 
but instead are long-run hypos. And 
contests and giveaways are merely one 
part of promotion. We submit a con- 
clusion that only over-all. sound pro- 
graming of which promotions are 
but a part — hypos ratings. And we 
further submit that promotions should 
not be cast in disrespect and disgrace 
bv a few clothheads in radio and tele- 
vision — for much of entertainment has 
always been and always will be based 
on sound, clean promotion.** ^ 



28 



SPONSOR 



5 JANUARY 1957 



EITATIONS? 



The pros and cons ■ is ant and tin 

i alums n, is the theme ecenl /.'// S tint* 

\eu ) ork. Defend iwaj s as pari all proi 

II. McLendon whose station, kl II . had just awarded 10 the I 

gest giveaway in histoi . Opposed •. 

// OR, Seu ) ork. Thei) debate is summarized in tlie excerpts l« 



says Robert Leder, General Manager <>l WOR, 
N<w York, giveaways jih a fly-by-night audience, make a mock- 
er) of ratings. Thej are a poor substitute for good programing 




It runs true to form that every 
gimmick or contest ever purveyed on 

the air v\a- to help an ailing property, 
a poor program, a sick station. \>> 
well-run. well-managed station in this 
country has had to give a\\a\ money 
to attract listeners. I would condone 
am g I station using any promo- 
tional device, including giveaways, to 
attract listeners if they felt their basic 
product was a sound one. However, 
money of itself is no replacement for 
entertainment nor for service. 

For years we as broadcasters have 
decried the enslavement of the adver- 
tiser and his agencv to ratings and 
what the\ do or do not represent. We 
sa\ that there is no corollary between 
ratings and the ability of a station to 
sell merchandise. We argue that the 
cost per thousand should not be the 
sole criterion of media buying. What 
do we do about it? We default! We 
synthesize ratings h\ giving away 
money, by running contests in a mad 
endeavor to achieve higher ratin-- 
which are as fleeting as the fickle 
audience who the next day tunes to 
the station that raises the ante. 

When and if the advertiser is mes- 
merized into buying the synthetic rat- 
ings, what is he getting for his money 
— the confidence of the listener? Quite 
the contrary. I believe he is buying 
inflated figures which will have no 
relationship to advertising impact. I 
have been told by all of the rating 
services that they themselves have tried 
every recourse to eliminate any but 
legitimate program promotions in rat- 



in- weeks because the Bervices them- 
selves know that it i- inevitable that 
their usefulness will be at an end un- 
less they reflect honest, accurate lis- 
tening habits. 

Several ve.n- ago .1 gr< .it bi oad> 
caster found the answei to one of the 
problems. ( huck Balthrope, "f KIM 
in San \niiMii". offered $5 to anyone 
u bo upon responding to the phone an- 
swered that lie h .1- listening t" KM I.. 
Of course the 1 "ineiilent.il sui vey be- 
ing made .it the time was instead made 

a shambles of. Foi five dollars San 
Antonio was Kill.'-. Mr. Balthrope 
was |>i"\ in. a point for all \ ears to 
come thai ratings based on gimmicks 
were invalid as a barometi 1 "t listener 
preference. 

In a report released to me by Mr. 
Sydney Roslow of Pulse, I take the 
following excerpts: In many markets 
throughout the I nited States radio sta- 
tions have attempted to buy audiences 
through one mean- or another. 

I sually -ui li a station broadi asts 
the promise to pay a sum of money if 
the respondent v\ill report listenership 
to this station when asked ovei the 
phone "i at the door "W hat station 
are you listening to?" In one city 
such a campaign v\a- carried on l>v 
one of the stations. During the same 
week 3,000 persona] interviews were 
made in the ■ it \ . The coincidental 
question was asked at the door — how- 
ever, the interviewer asked to examine 
the set to verify that the answer was 
a true one. Out of the 3,000 1 all-. 106 
reports of listening to the "reward-! 



listening" Btatioi 
the-. 106 !■ ports 

ondenl 
1.1 -ome othei station or not |i«t. • 
it alL li i- e\ idenl that the 
level to this station was inflated |.v 

tile 

report was not possible. 

\nd let- - dial all : ■ 

answei yes In a surv< I lally li-- 

tening to the station. I 

.ittelltivene-- I" the 

i- diluted, this 
pari ol the shov - the > lui 

clues. The 1 hie mti^t 

interest t.. at 

by the outside stimulus 
evei v tin 1 _ other than the 1 lu< 
comparison. I I 

a fill between two - thai 

hide the 1 une of the first Pharaoh of 
I gypt 

The newspapers bav< 
,\'\\ ■ 

that the mdv newspaper that I 
rim a contest in N< 
the 
all papers in Ni-» 1 "rk in tin 

\ e.ll I (• || 

Time- and the reason i- simply that 
the produi 1 i- 

olie . . . 

\ - iie hunt in a metropoli- 

tan area merely tend- t 
the outside audience in the -mall t 
and hamlet- m ho < annol ;• — ibly 
rici] 

travel and time. Hut win should 
umrv about them? I 
in the 1 7-. ounti " ^ 



SPONSOR 



5 JANUARY 1957 



29 



WHY TWA SWITCHED TO 

52-WEEK SPOT RADIO 

TWA swooped from a spot radio budget of nothing to $700,000 a 

year in five years; now buys year-round schedules after using flight 

patterns and getting immediate results in phone calls 




Radio plugs such features as berths on cross-country flights 

TWA measures spot by phone response 



Ticket sales are m direct proportion to the number of phone calls 
which TWA'? district offices get, so first requirement for all an- 
nouncements is a live tag urging listeners to call for information. 
Current transcribed series features big-name testimonials as well. 



Steady and continual reminder advertising is the reasoning behind 
the move from flight patterns in spot to year-round schedules. But 
none of the copy is institutional. Every commercial mentions spe- 
cific flights and costs, with secondary stress on speed and comfort. 



Individual flights for thirteen on-line and one off-line markets 
are mentioned in radio copy. Local district managers and head- 
quarters cooperate in final decisions. Air pattern: local person- 
alities, saturation frequencies, rotation of copy, multiple stations 



Flexibility of spot radio matches TWA's needs. Nature of air- 
line advertising is such that headquarters in effect plans ad strategy 
for 49 different "companies," its 49 district sales offices. This is 
because problems usually vary city by city and costs are different. 

lllllllllllllllllllllllllllIM 



I he Mightiness is gone from Trans 
World Airlines" radio pattern. Today, 
firm 52-week schedules of spot an- 
nouncements — in an ever increasing 
number of markets — replace TWA's 
former radio flight pattern: in two 
weeks, out two weeks, back in again. 

And TWA in 1956 booked more 
flights through the air as a result of its 
continuity on the air since the fall of 
1955. It took three years for the evo- 
lution of year-round spot schedules. 
says Domestic Advertising Manager 
John Keavey. This new consistency 
evolved from a single bit of informa- 
tion: the district managers (and TWA 
has 49 of them in the U. S., alone) re- 
ported that ticket sales swooped in the 
same flight pattern as did the radio ad- 
vertising: when it was on, sales were 
up; when radio was dropped, sales 
did, too. 

"We figured,'" says Keavey, "that if 
we could cure a sales problem in two 
weeks with our radio advertising, we 
could do it for 52 weeks." 

He's the doctor who prescribes the 
radio cure for all 49 domestic sales dis- 
tricts from coast to coast I though the 
districts do not break down by state. 






SPONSOR 



5 JANUARY 1957 




of radio copy 1st clnss-25 of radio copy 



Growth in — i > ■ ► i radio foi I r.m- WmM Airlines coincides »itli growth "i tourisl 
[ares. Tourisl rates necessitated .1 reach into the mass marki 

economic airline travel; T.v , ol TV\ \'~ rad pj emphasis is on tourist, JV; on I 

COast-tO-COast service I- ,ii ur»-~ plane which rarries l">lh t < >nr i -t pa in front, 



which the Dumber mighl suggi - 
These districts arc really like V> dif- 
ferent companies, says Keavey, be- 
1 ause each has an entirelj different 
advertising and marketing problem, 
and each has a totally different prod- 
act 

"' \ir travel isn't like a cigarette, or a 
loaf of bread. \n\ loaf of brand \ 
bread is like anj other loaf of X bread. 
People from coast to coast can identif) 

it immediately, and everyone has the 
same use for it. But air travel varies 
from city to city. It's a different prod- 
act in each, serving a different pur- 
pose, with a different goal, at a differ- 
ent price. It's not a unit product, or 
one which is easily marketable. 

Because these 49 district managers 
all have their own and bighl) 
unique problems. Keave) spends half 
his working time in the air. the othei 
half on the phone. Fortunately, he has 
a direct line to his New York adverti-- 
ing agency, Foote, Cone & Belding, a 
block away. So when the Chicago dis- 
trict manager calls to report that ad- 
vance bookings on Flight 101 are low, 
Keavey can Immediately call his agen- 
c\ and ask for a fast cop) switch in the 



(ilii< ago radio announcement w bedules. 

This kind of immediai j is one "f the 
major factors in I "\\ \ - continuing 
and heightened use of spol radio. 
"Radio bas made tin- most significant 
progress of an) advertising medium 
with 11- in the past fiv< years, 
Keavey. From "nothing," the radio 
budgel bas gone to 18^5 of the I 
allocation fur "commissionable me- 
dia" in the airline's domestic advertis- 
ing. This amounts to some $700,000 
annually. I I'W V also has world-wide 
advertising and promotion j'ti\ii\. as 
the airline operates trans-Atlantii and 
in Europe, \i> ica and Ksia 

The domesti( advertising aims al the 
•"pool"' of .111 tra\e| - in 

T\\ \ - on-line cities the 1 ities from 
ami to w bich it originates and directs 
llirht-. The Big Four, of course, 
New ^..tk. < bicago, I os \' geles and 

I 1 am isco. The other on-linei - 
B iston, Cleveland, Denver, K 
City, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Wash- 
ington, Phoenix and Oklahoma ( it\. 

Interestingly, T\\ \ maintain- radio 
schedules in one off-line city, San Di- 
ego, to and from which it has no direct 
Bights. ' - h ive a I 



office there li went 

I 
advertising could do in selling to th>- 
buge sen i' emen group tin 

k' 
icemen have far mot 
the II. thev rr il 

in travel I" - - ause tl • 
borne, and t lit \ have moi • 
knew we • ouldn t read) t 1 ■ •: thi 
l">i al pa: ' the) ha 

lute!) no interest in 

-m h. ^ rt Wl 

the idea of bu) ing a I VA \ ti< krt in 

- wh\ be 

? 
ules are -till on the air. 
Keave) bas built-in 

ther a.i. 

• id man 1 - mplain if th< 
-ult-! 
The) know immediate!) if radio i* 

il 

listeners to call the It* al I VA \ 
for further information. 

"Phone ' all- t( hat traff 

supermarl 
"There- a direct relationship bet ■ 



SPONSOR 



5 JANUARY 1957 






TWA SWITCH continued 



calls and ticket sales, and there's a 
mathematical relationship for ever) 

district." He doesn't re\eal these for- 
mulae, of course, but one ratio which 
gives an indication of the importance 
ol telephone inquiries conies from a 
typical major sales district. For every 
one passenger boarded — actually get- 
ting on a TWA plane — the local ollice 
estimates it takes three and one-half 
calls. 

I rgenc\ and immediacy are closely 
related in Keavey's mind. '"We urge 
people, in our radio copy, to pick up 
the phone. We have indications that 
thej do just that. ' 

In Cleveland recently, when all the 
dailj newspapers were on strike, the 
local district manager used radio for 
the first time. "We don't know exactly 
what happened," says Keavey, "but it 
was the best month this district ever 
had. Whether it was because there 
were more seats available, or good 
weather, or radio, we don't know. But 
it happened!" 

He's still studying the Cleveland 
case but, in the meantime, he knows 
for a fact "the more intensively radio 
is used, the more phone calls we get." 

Radio copy is designed to be pro- 
vocative and to capture attention, to be 
informative about specific flights and 




Three-way communica- 
tion /(lunches airline's 
air schedules. One link 
is district manager. 
This one is M. D. 
\ icon, New York . . . 







then to "sell" listeners on calling the 
district office. All copy plugs exact 
flights and costs, with about 75% of 
the emphasis on tourist flights and 
2595 on first class. The current copy 
series, rounding out its second month, 
"has brought us unsolicited customer 
comments for the first time," says the 
domestic advertising manager. "This 
is most unusual. Rarely do people 
ever say they saw our ad in the news- 
paper." 

What causes the comment? A new 
series of testimonials, given by "name" 
personalities (such as Guy Lombardo 
and Claire McCardell). This is a 40- 
second transcribed commercial which 
precedes a live 20-second tag (wherein 
lies the sell). The announcer inter- 
views the celebrity, they chat a bit, 
TWA gets a plug and then the live 
announcer comes in with the sugges- 
tion that the listener take a winter va- 
cation in Phoenix. 

This testimonial series has been 
"very successful, and we hope to con- 
tinue it for at least a year," says Kea- 
vey. The announcements are rotated, 
and new testimonials are always in 
production at the agency. Live copy 
has so many changes the headquarters 
office can't keep up with the final 
count! 

Frequency varies according to the 
sales district, in proportion to the sales 
contributed by that district to over-all 
flight sales. Thus, New York, which 
accounts for far more ticket sales than 
any other office, has a far bigger ad 
allocation. Frequency there is 25 a 
week on one station, 18 and 19 a week 
on two more, plus additional schedules 
on other outlets in the metropolitan 
area. 

The balance of spot radio activitv 
is weighted, however, to hike sales for 
a lagging district or for one of its 
empty flight schedules. Radio is used 
on the recommendation of the local 
district manager and on that of the 
headquarters sales office which brings 
its sales research unit into action on 




Second link is TWA headquarters 
domestic ad manager, John 
Keavey, who plans strategy 
tor 49 sales distrh is . . . 




Third link is the ad 
agency, FC&B, and 
TWA workers like Dick 
Romanelli, prod. sup. 



the decision, too. Its long-range fore- 
casts of air traveling or its short range 
analysis of TWA's activity and com- 
petitive stand are typical of factors 
taken into account when media are 
being selected. 

The district sales level is stressed 
throughout all operating departments 
because of the unusually local char- 
acter of the business. TWA's competi- 
tion is both national and regional, with 
many smaller, regional airlines com- 
peting for both intra- and inter-state 
travel. 

These are some of the big reasons 
TWA looks for "continuous identifica- 
tion and impression," and it runs 52- 
weeks radio schedules, says Keavev. 
"Historically, airlines have cut down 
on advertising during such peak sales 
periods as holidays, when we all have 
more business than we can handle. But 
now we want continuity, and we like a 
highly mass medium which offers a 
low cost-per-1.000. 

"This combination is particularlv 
important in light of the most signifi- 
cant innovation in airline travel in the 
past six years: the development of 
tourist fares." 

TWA likes local personalities to sell 
these tourist fares, and the concept of 
TWA quality and service. "We often 
become identified with stimulating lo- 
cal personalities who, in effect, sponsor 
us. Radio is still new and exciting to 
us and Ave also like its merchandising 
pluses very much even though we do 
little of this at the local levels our- 
selves." 

TWA's domestic advertising strategy 
is planned by Keavey in cooperation 
with Ford Sibley, the Foote, Cone & 
Belding account executive, and Henry 
Reigner, TWA's over-all director of 
advertising. Keavey, as domestic spe- 
cialist, has sat on both sides of the 
client desk. He worked at Fuller, 
Smith & Ross and at the G. M. Bas- 
ford agencies as an account executive 
on such accounts as Westinghouse and 
the RFC, before which he worked in 
promotion and advertising at Liberty 
Magazine. 

Today he"s fast becoming a radio 
specialist. He thinks the people who 
most underrate the medium "are the 
radio salesmen themselves. Thev don't 
know what they've got and thev're 
cj nieal about others who still have 
faith in it! As for us, we not only like 
radio we like what the other airlines 
are doinii in it!" ^ 






[ere nrv over five-dozen reports from stations throughout ili«- 
country on results obtained b\ advertisers using local or 
regional television. Histories detail costs, objectives .m<l 
promotional methods which <-an be used in 1 1 1 i — \r;ir"« campai; 



In the following sei tioi 

proven ■ 'I"" 

- 
tel< 

men can appl) I Uin pri 

1 1 1 i — j ear. \\ hetlu 
priced, luxur) 

vision tripled i 1 
burg doughni 



building suppl 
sion ; 



For idio Result* S e< bst week's SPONSOR 



TV RESULTS 



AUTOMOTIVE/ Nash Ramblers 



n|»()\SOR: Lorkhart-Collins Nash 



VGENCY: Direct 



1 U>S1 II ( VS1 HISTORY: To launch this newly-estab- 
lished Nash agency, company hosted Circle Four Ramblers 
this summer. After a six-week period, a tab showed 500 
potential customers gained as direct result of the show. 
During this time, firm sold 25 new Nash and Hudson 
automobiles, 23 of which were traced to Ramblers. Show 
is a weekly western musical devoted to songs of the sage 
country and religious hymns. Cost is $725. 



KBST-TV, Big Spring, Tex. 



PROGRAM : Participations 



AUTOMOTIVE/ New Cars 

SPONSOR: Anthony Abraham Chevrolet AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: From May through Decem- 
ber, 1955, Anthony Abraham Chevrolet sponsored Fea- 
ture Films, a late evening program. It concentrated on 
weekend and near-weekend broadcasts of the show. Ac- 
cording to the sponsor, an average of about 60 new cars 
per weekend was sold; and one of the commercials drew 
180 and 250 customers on each of two days. The Chev- 
rolet dealer paid $750 per week on WITV for the cam- 
paign, feels that the show and station were excellent 
vehicles in obtaining these results. 



WITV, Miami, Fla. 



PROGRAM : Feature Films 



AUTOMOTIVE/ Ford Come. 



SPONSOR: Ford Corner 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Ford Corner, Manchester, 
V. //., became New England's "largest" Ford dealer after 
its introduction of tv advertising. This dealer had been 
selling about 40 cars a month. A total of 155 new Fords 
were sold during the first month of television, 215 the 
next month and more than 115 during the third month 
which was a September and which tends to be a slack 
month for dealers. Ford Corner sponsors two WMUR-TV 
programs. Tv expenditures averaged $500 per week. 

WMUR-TV. Manchester, N. H. PROGRAM: Greatest Fights 

of the Century, Hum and Strum. 
Special events, Announcements 



AUTOMOTIVE/Ford 

SPONSOR: Pollard Motors 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The debut of the '56 Fords 
was the occasion for Pollard Motors to purchase a satu- 
ration spot campaign over W SEE-TV . It was the hope of 
James D. Pollard that he would move 21 cars with a 
three day campaign, using tv exclusively. The number 
of cars sold, however, topped the target figure by four. 
Total success of the sales was attributed to W SEE-TV . 
Cost of the drive to Pollard Motors was $400. The 
sponsor plans additional use of television. 



WSEE-TV. Erie, Pa. 



PROGRAM: Announcements 



AUTOMOTIVE/ DeSoto 

SPONSOR: M. O. Anderson 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Participations in Deadline, 
the station s news program, tripled sales for this Plym- 
outh-DeSoto dealer in 30 days. In all but one instance the 
car shown on the show was sold. Commercials are by 
executive of the company. Box score on used cars sold 
in nine days was 60. In same nine days, dealer delivered 
30 new cars. Cost of announcements : $75 each. (Excep- 
tion mentioned above: customer who bought more ex- 
pensive car than that shown on tv.) 



KOMO-TY, Seattle 



PROGRAM: Participations 



AUTOMOTIVE Used Cars 

SPONSOR: Town & Country Motors AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Selling cars these days is 
as tough a job as any retailer could want and all the 
resources available to the dealer must be used. Tele- 
vision proved its worth recently to the manager of Lewis- 
ton, Idaho's Town and Country Motors when the com- 
pany started sponsorship of a local Friday evening (9:00- 
9:05) newscast. The very next day two cars were sold 
as a direct result of the newscast and twice as many 
people as usual were on the lot. Cost per broadcast: 

KLEW-TV, Lewiston, Idaho 



PROGRAM: Newscast 



AUTOMOTIVE oidsmobie 



SPONSOR: Riverside Motor Sales, Inc. 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: "Business started booming" 
was the sponsor's way of describing the response to the 
first two presentations of the Riverside Video Theatre. 
As a result, 35 new Rocket 88 Oldsmobiles and 25 used 
cars were sold for a gross "in the neighborhood of 
$150,000." The combined cost for the first two shows 
was $790. The continued success of Video Theatre has 
also prompted Riverside to sponsor an additional 15 
minute live sports program. A half hour syndicated show 
is also under consideration. 



WSJV-TV, Elkhart, Indiana 



PROGRAM: Riverside Video 
Theatre 



AUTOMOTIVE/Used Cars 

SPONSOR: Sarwark Motors AGENCY: Culpepper 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Sarwark Motors, one of 
Phoenix' largest used car dealers, drew 297 responses to 
a single one-minute participation on KPHO-TV. The par- 
ticipation cost $25.80 and was one of the used car deal- 
er's regular schedule run on the station six days a week. 
The annual campaign costs Sarwark $6,708 and produces 
results that are stated thusly by the owner: "67% of our 
total sales can be attributed directly to television adver- 
tising." 



KPHO-TV, Phoenix 



PROGRAM: Participations 



.11 



vf.iN-uK 



5 JANUARY 1957 



please care*. 

because hunger hurts! 




because this little boy's not interested in catch- 
er's mitts or chemistry sets . . . He's hungry all 
the time. All he asks is enough to eat! 

because you can do something about it. You 
can help feed his family (a family of four) for a 
whole month with just a single dollar! 

because $1 to CARE sends 22 pounds of U. S. 
surplus food overseas — delivered in your name 
by CARE's world-wide organization! 



Send s l to 

CARE FOOD CRUSADE 

NEW YORK 16, NEW YORK 
or to your local CARE office 



SPONSOR • 5 JANUARY 1957 



35 



TV RESULTS 



AUTOMOTIVE/ Service Station 

SPONSOR: Rigg's Service Station AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Sports Capsule is part of 
WICS-TV "five-for-onc" i>l<in. u hereby advertiser spon- 
sors program once a week and receives a GO-second an- 
nouncement that day with 10-second commercials on 
other days. Free ice-scrapers were offered during a time 
where there was no snow, ice or cold weather. II ithin a 
few weeks, Rigg's Service Station had 4.800 calls as a re- 
sult of the offer — did more business than at any other 
comparable service station opening. Show cost $80.00. 



WICS-TV, Springfield, 111. 



PROGRAM: Sports Capsule 
Fights 



BANK/ Syracuse 

SPONSOR: Syracuse Savings Bank AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: One participation per week 
in Magic Toy Shop paid off for this sponsor. The show, 
which is aimed at preschool age tots, offered a free bank 
to those children ivho stopped in at a Syracuse Savings 
Bank Office with their parents. An average of 175 banks 
per week were given away to parents, many of whom also 
opened savings accounts at the bank. The bank give-a- 
ways were imprinted with pictures of Magic Toy Shop 
characters. Bank was very pleased with results of drive. 

WHEN-TV, Syracuse, N. Y. PROGRAM: Participations 



BANK/ Poland Springs 

SPONSOR: Depositors Trust Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY : /„ order to promote checking 
accounts at its 18 offices throughout Maine, this bank 
placed a four-month campaign on the station at cost of 
$3,000. Show was the 15-minute 6:00 O'Clock News, 
hosted Monday and Friday by Depositors Trust. Said 
M. S. Roberts, Jr. of the bank, "Many people requested 
the new type of checking account that they had heard of 
over the television station. Many times you cannot pin- 
point the results of advertising, but we feel we can." 

WMTW-TV, Poland Springs, Me. PROGRAM: 6:00 O'Clock News 



BANK/ West Palm Beach 

SPONSOR: Everglades Savings & Loan 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: A $100 a week investment in 
tv by this Florida bank reaped a return of $250,000 in 
new accounts. Campaign sold to a reluctant client on a 
"show me" basis started with two five-minute evening 
weather shows a week and was renewed for an additional 
13 weeks when first contract ran out. Queries to persons 
opening new accounts found customers coming from as 
far away as 80 miles to the north and 20 miles to the 
south. Campaign was especially impressive inasmuch as 
runny accounts came in prior to pre- July rush. 



BANK/ Rochester, Minn. 

SPONSOR: Farmers Loan & Thrift Co. 



AGENCY: Direct 



I VPSU1 .1. ( :ASE 1 1 [STORY : Farmers Loan & Thrift began 
telecasts from the station on 15 March 1954. Announce- 
ment schedule met with immediate success as reflected 
by an almost 100% increase in outstandings at com- 
pany's Rochester office, and by business increases in 
Albert Lea and Fairibault, Minn. Firms vice president 
did all commercials live, four nights per week during a 
regular movie break at 10:45. Shortly, Farmers' took 
sfjonsorship of half -hour plays. Cost: $185. 



KROC-TY, Rochester, Minn. 



PROGRAM: Top Plays 



WJNO-TV, West Pal... Bear!.. Fla. 



PROGRAM: Spotlight 
Weather 



CLEANING/ Drape Special 

SPONSOR: Yerbury-Dana Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: When renewing its 26-week 
contract with WHBF-TV for the Saturday night Quad- 
Cities on Camera, the sponsor wrote "results are expect- 
ed, and required, if any long-term advertising plan is 
continued." The results that convinced the client to re- 
new included more drape cleaning jobs in the single 
month of July than it had gotten the entire previous sum- 
mer. The 15-minute show was credited with all the in- 
crease by the sponsor who pays $76 per week for Quad- 
Cities on Camera. 

WHBF-TY, Rock Island, 111. PROGRAM: Quad-Cities on Camera 



CLEAN ING ' Laundry and Dry Cleaning 

SPONSOR: Puritan Laundry & Dry Cleaner AGENCY: Universal 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Puritan Laundry and Dry 
Cleaner Co. has found that crayons and cowboys can do a 
good selling job on tv in the early morning Sunday hours. 
A short while ago. firm began sponsoring Circle 3 Ranch, 
Sundays, 8:00-9:00 a.m. Format features "Rusty" Sosby 
(c western personality) , ivestern films and coloring con- 
test for which prizes are awarded weekly. Contest pic- 
tures to be colored are available at Puritan stores. Sur- 
veys show business has increased considerably. 



KMTV, Omaha, Neb. 



PROGRAM: Circle 3 Ranch 



AGENCY: Ben Woodhead 



CLEANING/Laundry 

SPONSOR: Shepherd Laundries 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Since January, 1956, when 
they began sponsoring Dr. Hundson's Secret Journal with 
the Coburn Supply Co., Shepherd Laundries has found 
that the show has increased business. Says W. S. Shep- 
herd, v. p. of the firm : "On the tv screen we were able to 
show how much clothing our storage box could hold and 
this service proved so popular that our storage vaults, 
though quite commodious, acre almost breaking at the 
seams." A free map offer, too, drew over 2,000 requests. 

KFDM-TV, Beaumont, Tex. 



PROGRAM: Dr. Hudson's 
Secret Journal 



36 



SPONSOR 



5 JANUARY 1957 






1 .. 




AT HIS FINGERTIP 



Your client, your idea, your planning. 
your spot ... all are dependent upon 
the move this hand makes now. 

At WNCT this is an "old hand" skilled 
through experience in precise produc- 
tion. With Emily Post-ish exacti i< 
this hand "does the right thing at the 
right time" hundreds of times a day. 
completing work initiated and develop- 
ed by people he's never seen. 



This final move is the most important 
one for it vitalizes your effo: 
ing your message to Eastern North Caro- 
lina. You needn't The move will 
be the right one. WNCT adv< 
know that! 




channel 9 nmmi en a» 



M'tlll ■•'(: NIHONlll' IT MOlllNOtlt 



SPONSOR 



5 JANUARY 195, 



37 



TV RESULTS 



CLOTHING/ Fashion Show 

SPONSOR: Morton's Apparel Store AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This was the store's first ven- 
ture into tv advertising. Program is a fashion show which 
features new styles for women. Although Morton s is re- 
luctant to give exact figures, its ad manager has been 
exuberant in his remarks concerning success of program. 
"Better than I had anticipated in such a short length of 
time" was comment after two programs. He has also in- 
dicated a 10% increase in sales, with new customers from 
as far as 30 miles from Springfield. 

WICS-TV. Springfield, 111. PROGRAM : Models from Mortons 



CLOTHING Coats 

SPONSOR: John A. Brown Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: John A. Brown Co. received 
a shipment of finished coltskin full-length ladies' coats, 
priced from $99.95 to $129.95. Using two class A and 
one class B announcements over a three-day period, the 
company succeeded in completely selling out its stock, 
including the three coats worn by Brown's model during 
the commercials. No other advertising media were used 
in the drive. Cost to the advertiser amounted to $247.50. 

WKY-TV, Oklahoma City, Okla. PROGRAM: Announcements 



CLOTHING Men s Shirts 

SPONSOR: Sears, Roebuck & Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY : Sears, Roebuck & Co.'s Tulsa 
retail store chalked up a 50% gain in sales of men's 
cotton sport shirts in just one week, following a noon 
show demonstration of the new developments and uses 
of cotton fabrics. R. R. McFadden of Sears, Roebuck, 
who merely used a sport shirt among several other cotton 
items to illustrate one of the uses of cotton, stated: "Sales 
have been 50% greater than those of the past four or 
five years." Other stores also reported increases. 

KVOO-TV, Tulsa, Okla. PROGRAM: Special demonstration 



CLOTHING /Sport Shoes 

SPONSOR : U. S. Rubber AGENCY : Fletcher D. Richards, N. Y. 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: More indication that chil- 
dren respond to tv commercials on juvenile shows: 
Among the sponsor's five commercials a week in KRON's 
Fireman Frank, was one that featured a puppet called 
"Carl the Carrot." In connection with it, three-color 
plastic buttons were made up and sold to dealers at 6c 
each to be given with the sale of each pair of U. S. 
Rubber's Keds. Within six weeks 25,000 buttons were 
given out, most of them representing sales. Cost of the 
campaign was $555 per week. 

KRON-TV, San Francisco PROGRAM: Fireman Frank 



CLOTHING/Children s Shoes 

SPONSOR: Red Ball Jets AGENCY: Campbell-Mithun 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: From 13 March through 21 
April, 1956, Red Ball Jets used two one-minute announce- 
ments weekly. They were aired on Tuesdays at 6:00 
p.m. and Saturdays at 2:30 p.m. for ten weeks. The 
sponsor's goal was to promote the product and urge kids 
to go to Red Ball Jet dealers and enter a contest for an 
electric car. After the first 12 announcements, over 10,- 
000 entries has been received. According to the company 
$1,800 spent had brought more than satisfactory results. 

WBTV, Charlotte, N. C. PROGRAM: Announcements 



CLOTHING Shoe Special 

SPONSOR: Hill Brothers Shoe Stores AGENCY: Richard Lane 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: To introduce and promote a 
new method of shoe merchandising — a local chain of self- 
service shoe stores featuring two pairs of children's shoes 
for $5 — Hill Brothers bought a total of five experimental 
announcements to run one day a week on hour-long, Mon- 
day-through-Friday Whizzo's Wonderland. During first 
week, more than 1,000 customers had mentioned show. 
Results: addition of four stores and increased schedule. 

KMBC-TY, Kansas City, Mo. PROGRAM: Participations 



COSMETICS /Hair Styling Kits 

SPONSOR: Liggett Drug Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: According to Scott Appleby, 
manager of this Ft. Myers Liggett Drug Company, "TVs 
selling power was demonstrated most effectively.'' One 
film demonstration and one live demonstration used on 
four successive days resulted in sale of 600 hair styling 
kits and dollar volume in excess of $2,400. Ten minutes 
after tv showing, "our store was packed with men and 
women buying the product they had just seen on tv." 
Cost of the campaign totaled $222.80. 



WINK-TV, Fort Myers, Fla. 



PROGRAM: Participations 



COSMETICS/Make-Up Kit 

SPONSOR: Charles Antell AGENCY: Joseph Katz, Baltimore 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Although a price tag of $5 
is generally considered high for a mail order item on tv, 
the Charles Antell Co. sold a total of 6,317 items at this 
price in 10 days. A make-up kit was advertised on a 
quarter-hour participation in the Bill Ballance show and 
the Dick Garton movie, both daytime programs as well as 
in a fialf hour evening movie. The high ratio of phone 
orders (4,834) to mail orders (1,483) indicates that the 
viewers were forcefully sold by the tv advertising. Cost of 
the campaign: $5,171 or about 82c per order. 



KCOP, Los Angeles 



PROGRAMS: Participations 



38 



SPONSOR • 5 JANUARY 1957 



the TOP markets 

in National Spot! 





KSD-TV in St. Louis carried more regional and rational spot 
accounts than did stations in the New Yorlt, Chicago, Detroit or 
San Francisco markets. 

KSD-TV (in America's ninth market) ranked FIFTH among tele- 
vision stations in the nation's TEN TOP markets in the number of 
regional and national spot accounts carried.* 

Facts such as these offer further evidence that advertisers 
have repeatedly found KSD-TV does achieve the results tfiey 
in the rich, diversified St. Louis market. 

If you have distribution in the St. Louis area, we invite you 
to investigate the KSD-TV story. 



*Rorabaugh Report, 3rd quarter 1956 




TV RESULTS 



COSMETICS/ Shampoo 

SPONSOR: Blondex Shampoo AGENCY: Firestone 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: In January, 1956, Blondex 
decided to try a one-minute test announcement on Ted 
Steele's Bandstand in order to appeal to what is primarily 
a teen-age market. One announcement was aired, offer- 
ing a free sample of Blondex Shampoo — a shampoo es- 
pecially for blondes. On the strength of this announce- 
ment, Blondex received over 1,200 requests for samples. 
As a result, company signed up for two announcements 
per week on a 26-week basis via Firestone Advertising. 

WOR-TV, New York PROGRAM: Ted Steele's Bandstand 



DEPT. STORE/ Rochester 

SPONSOR: Sibley, Lindsay & Curr AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The TvB and three Rochester 
stations, cooperated with the client to promote its annual 
warehouse sale. Campaign started the Monday before the 
four-day sale and went into a schedule of 149 announce- 
ments spread over 70 hours of air time during the sale. 
Approximately 75% of the announcements were sched- 
uled on Tuesday and Wednesday with a heavy emphasis 
on daytime to reach women. Total campaign cost of over 
$5,000 boosted sales 13% over previous year's sale. 



WVET-TV, WHEC-TV, WHAM-TV, Rochester 



PROGRAM: 

Announcements 



DEPT. STORE/ Denver 

SPONSOR: Montgomery Ward & Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: To promote its new fall 

fashion line the company used 15 minute segments on 
the Starr Yelland Matinee. One objective was introduc- 
tion of new synthetic mink coats retailing at about $100 
which were shown on the first show, on a Monday. The 
entire 50 coat stock was sold out by the following morn- 
ing. By the following Thursday a fresh order of 100 
more coats was also sold out. Cost of the 15 minutes 
was $130; gross return was $15,000. 

PROGRAM: Participations 



KLZ-TV, Denver 



DEPT. STORE/ Kansas City 

SPONSOR: Hall's Gift Shop AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Hall's turned to television 

this past summer to promote their toy section and signed 
for one participation on the Happy Home Show to pro- 
mote a drawing for a miniature Pontiac. Customers had 
to come to the store and register to be eligible. From 
the one announcement the store got 400 in-store registra- 
tions. Pull of one announcement moved the store to put 
55% of a $4,000 ad budget in tv via KMBC-TV for 17 
week, thrice weekly campaign. 



KMBC-TV, Kansas < ity, Mo. 



PROGRAM: Participations 



DEPT. STORE/ Manchester, N. H. 



SPONSOR: Raymond's of Boston 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: When WMUR-TV started 
programing its Wednesday Night Fights, a potential co- 
sponsor, Raymond's, hesitated to buy, unconvinced of sta- 
tion coverage. During the first telecast, Ernie Saunders, 
a sportscaster, suggested that viewers write Raymond's, 
saying they were watching. An avalanche of 2,800 letters 
from fans in the Greater Boston area descended upon 
Raymond's in the next five days. Result: A new co-spon- 
sor for the Wednesday Night Fights. 

WMUR-TV, Manchester, N. H. PROGRAM: Wednesday Night 



DEPT. STORE/Candy Counter 

SPONSOR: F. W. Woohvorth Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The first attempt at tv ad- 
vertising worked out quite well for a local W oolworth 
store. Manager D. Moore bought a five-minute participa- 
tion on Tv Showcase to advertise his candy counter before 
Christmas. The segment was televised at 6:25 on 15 
December and sold out the candy counter three times 
before the holiday. Moore reported he was "more than 
pleased with the proved results of the first tv participa- 
tion." Cost of the five-minute segment: $16. 



CKSO-TV, Sudbury, Ont. 



PROGRAM: TV Showcase, 
Participation 



DRUGS/Anri histamine 

SPONSOR: Anahist Co. 



AGENCY: Ted Bates 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Anahist had advertised for 
some years both on WSUN Radio and Television. From 
1952, it had aired class A 60-second announcements on 
Tuesday nights at a cost of $6.75 each. In a recent letter 
to the station, Anahist's executive v.p., J. S. Hewitt stat- 
ed, "The effectiveness of this expenditure is best evi- 
denced in your area by the 66% increase we have en- 
joyed since 1952." The New York company spends al- 
most 100% of its ad budget for spot radio and tv. 



WSUN-TV, St. Petersburg, Fla. 



PROGRAM: Announcements 



DRUGS/Cold Reliever 

SPONSOR: Anahist Co. AGENCY: Ted Bates 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: A sales increase of 81% 
in KRON-TV's area is reported by Anahist Co., an or- 
ganization that spends most of its advertising allowance 
in the broadcast media. The company had consistently 
used late evening participations in a five-a-week mystery 
strip. Recently, it was reported that August through 
December, 1955 volume topped sales for the same months 
of the previous year by 81%. Says the company, "Ana- 
hist is having a terrific season in the KRON-Tl market." 



KRON-TY, San Francisco, Cal. 



PROGRAM: Participations 



40 



SPONSOR 



5 JANUARY 1957 





pople watch 
V in DENVER 



cl NIGHT 



COVERAGE AREA LEADERSHIP 

New Nielsen survey shows 

MORE people watch 

KLZ-TV 

EVERY DAY 

and 

EVERY NIGHT 

day-in and day-out 

than any other Denver 

TV station 



TV 




FIRST IN AUDIENCE 

New November ARB just released proves 

KLZ-TV FIRST AGAIN 

with greatest Share of Audience 

DAY and NIGHT 

sign-on to sign-off Every Day — Every Night 



Step up to KLZ-TV! Denver's highest ratings 
k ° Denver's largest audience 

lt- v Denver's highest powered TV station 
Denver's selling-est personalities. 
Call your 

KATZ man or wire Jack Tipton, 
General Sales Manager, NOW! 



Denver's highest powered TV station. 

Represented nationally by the KATZ Agency. 



SPONSOR • 5 JANUARY 1957 



41 



TV RESULTS 



FOOD/ Baked Goods 

SPONSOR: Keebler Baking Co. AGENCY: McKee- Albright 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Storybook House, a dra- 
matization by puppets of children s classic stories, dou- 
bled its mail pull each week for the first four weeks it 
ran on WPTZ. Weekly drawing contests are run for the 
cfuldren to depict one of the show's characterizations. 
Entries are submitted with a Keebler label, and can win 
the child a 20-volume set of the Book of Knowledge. The 
sponsor states its philosophy this way: "We recognize the 
importance of children as customers." Time costs for the 
15-minute Saturday morning feature: $323 per week. 



« PTZ-TV, Plattsburg, N. Y. 



PROGRAM: Storybook House 



FOOD/ Lettuce 

SPONSOR: Knighton Fruit Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: /« a situation where a 
number of wholesalers distribute identical merchandise 
the Knighton Fruit Co. bought a single program to plug 
what it termed a "Tv Special." Lettuce was chosen for 
the first week's special and a live commercial, featuring a 
chef preparing a salad, reminded shoppers to watch for 
the "Tv Special" banner at tlieir grocers. Consumer de- 
mand was so great that the company's shipments more 
than doubled. In addition, the sponsor added six new 
retail accounts to his routes. Cost of program: $276.50. 

KTBS-TV, Shreveport, La. PROGRAM: Man Behind the Badge 



FOOD/ Coffee Cakes 

SPONSOR: Eisner's 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: To get some idea of the 
strength of the Florian Zabach Show, which it sponsors 
on WICS-TV, this grocery chain ran a special offer. View- 
ers were offered a coffee cake and a pound of coffee at the 
special price of 99c. The special was advertised on only 
a single weekly show, and the stores sold 500 more 
coffee cakes than ever before. There was such a great 
demand, the sponsor had to have a special bakery order 
to meet it. Program cost: $250. 

\\ [< S-TV, Springfield, 111. PROGRAM: Florian Zabach Show 



FOOD/ Cookies 

SPONSOR: Schaible's Bakery AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: For the three weeks before 
Christmas, Schaible's Bakery sponsored A Visit With 
Santa Monday through Friday from 5:45 to 6:00 p.m. 
Children wrote letters which Santa read on the show and 
they also visited him in the studios. Commercials fea- 
tured Santa eating the sponsor's Christmas cookies. The 
$1,200 outlay brought this response from the bakery's 
sales manager: ". . . our sales of Christmas cookies broke 
all previous records — increasing 25% over last year." 

WGLV, Easton, Pa. PROGRAM: A Visit With Santa 



FOOD/ Doughnuts 

SPONSOR: Krispy Krene Doughnut Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: After three weeks of tv ad- 
vertising with one-minute participations the client's two 
stores tripled their business. These results were obtained 
with tv. though other media had been explored with little 
success. A soft copy approach on the Harry Smith Show 
made people who had previously seen the shows but never 
tried the product aware of the stores. The firm also 
reports many repeat orders have been coming in as the 
campaign progresses. The total cost of each of the par- 
ticipations was $32. 



WSl N-TY. St. Petersburg 



PROGRAM: Harry Smith Show, 
Participations 



FOOD Ice Cream 

SPONSOR: High's Ice Cream Corp. AGENCY: Al Jacobson 

Agency 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Ziv TV's Mr. District Attor- 
ney sells 25 flavors of ice cream for High's. Client began 
with co-sponsorship of Mr. D.A. in the fall of 1954 and 
picked up full sponsorship a year later. Growth of busi- 
ness from 14 to 34 stores in two years is attributed to 
95% of ad budget invested in tv. Winter sales have been 
doubled and programs plugging special flavors have re- 
sulted in sellouts in all store locations following program. 
Weekly cost is $750. 

WTAR-TY, Norfolk, Va. PROGRAM: Mr. District Attorney 



FOOD/ Bread Mix 

SPONSOR: Spruance Bread Mix AGENCY: Thomas M. Bratton 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: A sales increase of 3,750% 
resulted from a one-minute-a-week spot used by the com- 
pany since December, 1955. Before beginning its adver- 
tising campaign (limited to this once-a-week schedule), 
the advertiser sold 20 cases of bread mix per month. 
Since December, sales have jumped to 750 cases each 
month. After the spot was introduced into Kay's Kitchen, 
demand far outran the supply. Fact that Adm. Byrd took 
Spruance on recent expedition tied in with campaign. 



WHEN-TY, Syracuse, N. Y. 



PROGRAM: Participation 



FOOD/ Macaroni 

SPONSOR: American Beauty AGENCY: Rogers & Smith, 

.Macaroni Co. Potts-Turnbull 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Three jmrticipations per week 
on KAKE-TV's Deputy Dusty kept sales of American 
Beauty Chili-Roni from slumping during "an abnormally 
hot summer which could seriously affect the sales of a 
chili and macaroni packaged dinner." These are the words 
of the agency which began the tv campaign for the prod- 
ucts, and they report that sales were "brisk" despite the 
adverse iveatlier. The campaign began in February 1955 
and is credited by tlie agency with "the continued high 
sales . . . in the market." Cost per participation : $45. 

KAKE-TY, Wichita PROGRAM: Deputy Dusty, Participations 



42 



SPONSOR 



5 JANUARY 1957 



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The only book of its kind — the most expert 
route to radio and television timebuying. A 
group of men and women who represent the most 
authoritative thinking in the field talk with 
complete candor about tv and radio and the 
opportunities these media offer. 



4 HOW DIFFERENT RATING SYSTEMS VARY IN 
THE SAME MARKET T5c 

Ward Dorrell, of John Blair (station reps), 
shows researchers can be as far as '_'<>0% apart in 
local ratings. 

5 TELEVISION BASICS 35c 

24 Pages 

6 RADIO BASICS 35c 

21 Pages 

7 FILM BASICS 25c 

12 Pages 

8 PROCTER AND GAMBLE STORY 25c 

20 Pages 



9 ADVERTISING AGENCY IN TRANSITION 25c 

10 92 WAYS TV MOVES MERCHANDISE 25c 



l 
11 TIPS ON TV COMMERCIALS 

6 P 



25c 



12 NEGRO RADIO HAS COME OF AGE 25c 
16 Pa 

13 WHY 5 NATIONAL ADVERTISERS BOUGHT 

SPOT RADIO 25c 

■ /■ 



14 VOLUME FOR YEAR 1955 



$15 



L955, bound in sturdy 
quick r • rod volui 



15 BINDERS 



1— $4 2— $7 



1 Iandy bindi 

Sle of .■ all 

times. Made of hard-wearing lear 

printed in gold, thej U d ake a han 

t ion to your 



SPONSOR SERVICES 

40 East 4?th St., New York 17, N. Y. 

Please send me the SPONSOR SERVICES encircled by number 
below: 



12 3 4 5 6 7 



Name 



9 10 11 12 13 14 15 



Addr 



City 



ZoM 



State 






Enclosed is my payment of $ 



Quj Upon Request 



SPONSOR 



5 .1 \M \KY I 1 '" 






TV RESULTS 



FOOD/ Milk 

SPONSOR: Farmers Milk 



AGENCY: Pacific National 



CAPSULE CASE HI- loin : Television brought a 20% 
sales increase in a six -month period to Farmers Milk of 
Portland, Ore. I sing 40 announcements per month (10- 
seconds each) , a weather forecast station-break, this 
dairy company, through KPTV and its agency, realized 
20% increase in sales and a substantial distribution hike. 
Increase was particularly gratifying in light of the fact 
th-at this was usually a slow time for cold beverage sales. 



KPTV, Portland, Ore. 



PROGRAM: Announcements 



FOOD/ Popcorn 

SPONSOR: Brook's Potato Chip Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The lowest volume product 
in the Brook's Company line was its packaged pop corn. 
In an attempt to test the strength of tv advertising in 
selling the product, Mr. Lloyd Brooks, president of the 
company, arranged for a series of one minute announce- 
ments. The response was immediate and from as far away 
as Joplin, some 70 miles distant, distributors who never 
stocked pop corn began getting calls for it. In 90 days 
sales had increased by 300%. Says Mr. Brooks, "KYTV 
is now definitely a major part of our advertising 
program." 



KYTV, Springfield, Mo. 



PROGRAM: Announcements 



FOOD/ Potato Chips 

SPONSOR: Mrs. Howe's AGENCY: Maercklein-Nelson 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Mrs. Howe's Potato Chips 
has been a well-known local product using, in moderation, 
several other media. On 3 October 1955, company started 
five participations a week in Looney Tunes, with a live 
commercial by the show's m.c. Show runs Monday 
through Friday from 4:00-5:00 p.m. After the first month 
on the air, sales increase in potato chips was over 25%. 
Increases continued in following months, and Mrs. 
Howe's quickly renewed for participations on W1SN-TV. 

WISN-TV, Milwaukee, Wise. PROGRAM: Participations 



FOOD/ Sauces 

SPONSOR: Buitoni Foods AGENCY: J. Walter Thompson 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: As a major part of a 26-week 
campaign recently, Buitoni Foods Corp. sponsored Life 
With Father on WPIX. In a subsequent letter to the 
station, the following was written: "I just wanted to go 
on record on behalf of Buitoni Foods Corp. as to the 
results achieved via our sponsorship of Life With Father 
. . . during the 26 weeks of the series, the Buitoni sales 
increased considerably." He said that this was a fine 
part of a campaign in which 75% is allocated to tv. 



WPIX, New York 



PROGRAM: Life With Father 



FOOD/ Soft Drink 

SPONSOR: Squirt-Detroit Bottling AGENCY: Boylhart-Lovett 

& Dean 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The company used a broad 
range of media throughout 1955, including television 
and newspaper advertising. Twice weekly it sponsored 
a five minute weather forecast titled Miss Fairweather 
from 11:15 to 11:20, following the 11 o'clock news. 
From October to December, all advertising except tv 
was dropped. Nevertheless, sales increased by 70% 
during a normally quiet period in the beverage industry. 

WJBK-TV, Detroit, Mich. PROGRAM: Miss Fairweather 



FOOD/ Meat 

SPONSOR: Southland Provision Co. AGENCY: Bradley, 

Graham & Hamby 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The Adventures of Kit Car- 
son, has been used by Southland Provisions to advertise 
its Azalea Meats. To test pull of show among youngsters 
a giveaway item was offered for seven consecutive weeks 
through a daily announcement made Monday through 
Friday. During the test period 749 requests for the give- 
away were received. Dolly Hamby of WIS-TV reported, 
"We feel that viewer reaction was excellent proof of the 
show's popularity." 



WIS-TV, Columbia, S. C. 



PROGRAM: Adventures of Kit 
Carson 



FOOD/ Beef 

SPONSOR : Thorofare Stores 



AGENCY: Ketchum, MacLeod 
& Grove 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Nearly 300,000 pounds of 
beef (12 carloads) were sold in less than three hours after 
a one-shot tv presentation on a late evening program the 
night before. The commercial was featured in 16 min- 
utes of ads interspersing a 90-minute motion picture play 
beginning on a Friday night at 11:15 p.m. Advance news- 
paper advertising provided viewer build-up for the com- 
mercials, which had an educational slant. A poll of 
58 stores gave the 300,000-pound story. 



KDKA-TV, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



PROGRAM: Participations 



FOOD/ Meat 

SPONSOR: John Morrell & Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: From 1 January through 20 
January, 1956, 16,804 pieces of mail were received by 
Roger Russell, m.c. of The Morrell Treasure Chest (6:45- 
7 :00 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays) . Only inducement for 
the mail was that people write in suggesting what key Rog 
take from a board to open the treasure chest, which con- 
tained Morrell Meat products. A total of 77 counties were 
heard from — 44 in South Dakota; 20 in Minnesota; 12 
in Iowa and one in North Dakota. 

KELO-TV, Sioux Falls, S.D. PROGRAM -.Morrell Treasure 

KDLO-TY, Satellite in Florence, S.D. Chest 



44 



SPONSOR 



5 JANUARY 1957 






the same 
everywhere. 




IN MINNEAPOLIS ...ST. PA UL 




TOP FROM 

COAST TO 

COAST! 



The sensational MGM-TV success story has made trade 
headlines and station history from L.A. to N.Y. No matter 
where you put the M-G-M features, they skyrocket ratings 

right up to the skies. 

In Minneapolis-St. Paul all the odds were against the 
M-G-M features coming up with a top rating. They were 
programmed on an independent channel -against top net- 
work competition -and in a time-slot with a previous raling 
history of only 2.4 (Nov. ARB 1 . 

Nevertheless, on December 8th. when KMGM-TV kicked 
off with Clark Gable and Lana Turner in "Honky-Tonk". the 
average Trendex was 25.3 - topping the second station by 
more than ten points! Average share: 48.8 

If you are statistic-minded, this is about equal to all three 
of the competing stations combined. And if you're billing- 
conscious, it means that now is the time to make inquiry 
about the availability of the M-G-M library in your area. 



Write, wire or phone 

Charles C. Barry. Vice-President, 1540 Broadway. New York 




TV RESULTS 



FURNITURE/ Children's Chairs 



SPONSOR: Western Supply Co. 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: A stock of children s chairs 
that had been bought by the sponsor on a trip to Mexico 
in 1954 had been gathering dust for 16 months and had 
only been depleted by 10. Last December he purchased 
a single two minute live announcement at 6:05 p.m. on a 
Tuseday evening. In less than 24 hours over 100 of the 
chairs had been sold for $1.95 each. The sponsor now has 
half sponsorship of Annie Oakley each week and is so 
enthused that he has written for additional television 
availabilities. 



WkBT-TV, La Crosse, Wisconsin 



PROGRAM: Xmas Shopping 
Guide 



FURNITURE/ Saturday Sales 



SPONSOR: Nelson Bros. Furniture 



AGENCY: Gordon Best 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Earlier this year, Nelson 
Bros, started sponsoring Pee Wee King, aired from 10:00- 
10:30 p.m. and 10:45-11 :15 p.m., Fridays. A letter to the 
station from the agency stated that "from the very first 
show . . . Saturday sales at Nelson Bros. . . . have been 
going up 50%." On one Saturday, during a slow season, 
sales were four times above the normal level. Particularly 
noteworthy was the fact that business came from many 
rural areas — areas where business is sought by the firm. 



WTSN-TV. Milwaukee, Wis. 



PROGRAM: Pee Wee King 



FURNITURE/Cedar Chests 

SPONSOR: A & N Furniture AGENCY: Holland Advertising 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The advertiser is running a 
39-week camjmign using one-minute announcements in 
feature movies three times a night, five nights a week. Re- 
cently, A & N devoted nine announcements over a five 
day period to cedar chests. Sales of this item grossed 
$12,360. In addition, six 10-second mentions at the tag- 
end of these spots, resulted in sale of 144 mirrors at $9.95 
each. The sponsor, satisfied with results, continues with 
this campaign at a cost of $75 per announcement. 



WKRC-TV, Cincinnati, Ohio 



PROGRAM: Announcements 



FURNITURE/ Bedding 

SPONSOR: Sanitary Mattress Factory AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Around-the-clock program- 
ing in Spanish is not very common on tv, but it is suc- 
cessful for advertisers in the San Antonio market. The 
Sanitary Mattress Factory, using only three announce- 
ments a week on KCOR-TV, reports a 30% gain in 
business. Commenting on the results achieved through 
tv, the sponsor wrote: "There is no doubt that KCOR-TV 
reaches the homes where our business comes from." 
The price of the announcements is $23 apiece. 

KCOR-TV, San Antonio PROGRAM: Announcements 



FURNITURE/ Sofa Beds 

SPONSOR: G & E Furniture Co. 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Every fourth Monday eve- 
ning at 7:00 G & E sponsors a feature film under the title 
G & E Tv Theatre. An example of the program's success 
was illustrated by the recent sale of a sofa bed unit 
including lamps, table and rug for $199. Within a week 
after the telecast 16 of the units were sold. Jim Sorenson, 
sales manager for the firm added, "The results go further 
than the figures quoted, for we know that the effect of our 
advertising message is felt weeks and even months after 
the original telecast date." 



WICS-TV, Springfield, 111. 



PROGRAM: G & E Tv Theatre 



FURNITURE/ Mattresses 



SPONSOR: Serta Mfg. Co 



AGENCY: Bozel & Jacobs 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The Serta Manufacturing 
Company ran Hobbies for Fun on the station four con- 
secutive Mondays recently, at 7:30 p.m. Newspaper and 
direct mail promotions were used to highlight the show. 
After the four programs were aired, the area distributor 
of Serta Mattresses indicated that sales had been doubled 
over those of the previous three months. Bozel & Jacobs, 
an Omaha, Neb., agency, had arranged the $100 campaign 
for Serta on this West Virginia tv outlet. 



WJPB-TY. Fairmont. W. Ya. 



PROGRAM: Hobbies for Fun 



HOUSEHOLD/ Hardware 

SPONSOR: Dunham-Hanson Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The Dunham-Hanson Com- 
pany, distributors of paints, locks and other hardware 
goods, first used tv in the fall of 1954, budgeting 25% of 
its ad allotment to an announcement campaign. Previ- 
ously it had used radio and neivspapers exclusively. From 
1954 to 1955, sales of Kyanize Paints increased 20%, 
although national paint sales went up only 6.6%. Now, 
60% of its annual $6,000 budget is appropriated to tv. 
Company attributes success to live demonstrations. 



W-TWO, Bangor, Maine 



PROGRAM: Announcements 



HOUSEHOLD/Paint 

SPONSOR: Wollner's Paint & Hardware AGENCY: Dirtct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Wollner's paint and wall- 
paper store in Zanesville, O., chose television as the best 
means available for the introduction of a new jyaint 
product. Announcements were purchased over a three day 
period running from Wednesday to Friday. The mid-week 
schedule was chosen in order to tell viewers to stock up 
for week-end painting. The participations purchased on 
the Denny Taylor Show cost Wollner's just $60 and was 
the only advertising used. According to Wollner's, 201 
sales totaling $924 resulted. 






WHIZ-TV, Zanesville. Ohio 



PROGRAM: Announcements 



16 



SPONSOR 



5 JANUARY 1957 



TV RESULTS 



HOUSEHOLD/ Screen Doors 
SPONSOR: The Vance} ' o KG] Nl V i 

CAPSULE cask HISTORY After a single demonstra- 
tion on the Hank Thornlr\ and tin- News thow, 22 in 

quiries were received about a brand-new product 
luxe model, atl-aluminunt screen door for - ■ 
Of the 22 inquiries, eight were concerted into sales OJ 
the model shown, despite the jact that less-expei 
models ucic displaced at the point of purchase. This 

was a total of 8176 in sales for an advertising outlay 
of only $75 for the five-minute news show. 



KB! 1 TV, Sacramento 



PROGB \M: Hank Thornley urul 
the \ eu 



HOUSEHOLD/ Shower Stalls 

SPONSOR: Erie Builders Supplj \U \< 1 D 

I IPS! M I KSE HISTORY: On Erie Builder's first ven- 
ture into tc. a single 20-second live announcement was 
used to advertise a shower stall at $59.95. Commercial 
immediately followed $64,000 Question, and emphas 

fact that stall usually retailed for $79.50. \ot onh did 

Erie Builders sell out it* stock; hut it tooh orders foi an 
additional dozen-and-u-half shower •■lull*. Total sales 
icere $3,896.75. Cost of the in July 1956 announcement 
on 11 SEE was $45.00. 



WSEE-TV. Erie. Pi 



PROGRAM: \.m , 



HOUSEHOLD/Spray Cun Kit 



SPONSOR: Labor Savers 



\(.l \i ^ I r|r\ i-ii.ii advertising 

As?" 



I VPS1 I I « VSE HISTORY: KGMB-Tl was one of 200 
stations regularly scheduling a 15 minute film tunc 
weekly. Within the first five and a half necks, 6 14 spray 
gun kits were ordered through the program at $19.95 
each. In pointing out that a great volume of saJ> 
rare for that particular item, the agency said KGMB-Tl - 
record was "tops." The cost of the first ten telecasts 
to the advertiser was S810 or $81 per telecast. 



KCMB-TV. Honolulu. Hawaii 



PROGRAM: Films 



HOUSEHOLD Storm Windows 

SPONSOR: Concord Window Co. \U.\< \ ; Direcl 

I M'M I E CASE HISTORY: Concord Window Co. wanted 
to develop leads for its salesmen in the central \ etc Eng- 
land and greater Boston area. It placed 12 run-of-sched- 
ule announcements per week on the station. Continuance 
of the drive was contingent upon the cost per lead not 
exceeding $10. Not only did the sponsor get leads from 
six Xew England states, but the cost per lead was slightly 
over 83.00. Concord Window has since stepped up its 
schedule to 17 announcements weekly. 



WMUR-TV, Manchester. N. H. 



PRO(^R VM: Announcements 



REAL ESTATE^ Ho 

I \l-i LI CASI 

house pu • he 

"""/""■ " to the 

by the ( | 

loan thou •■ aturii 

sored by I A S i an effort t 

$18,000 

.■»/,/( week-end with four sale 

, ost a as ^ I I . plu . itation • ■■ 

kl / l\ D PROGR \M I i 



REAL ESTATE/ Acreage Tracts 



^I'uN-iii; Bihmore K< 






I APS1 M CASI HISTO Early this year, fi 

/;/; a three-mnruh dm e t<> sell hoau 

one-minute annouru en -itrai t, t> ■ 

• ild 280 "aci rets" three montl 

vance of the tunc deadline it had f 

commercials were telecast In >■ within the John I 1 
gram. Total • ost t<> Biltmoi I 
on " //' /' . which was the onh </• 

used, amounted I" $1,000. s '/»<ir/ >/<r ind 



Ki I \ I \ I- ; ■ I v 



PROi.R \\\ \ 



SPECIALTY/ View Masters 

SPONSOR E. W. Edwards a S ■ • • ■ ' ■■ ■'• '• \ ' 

CAPSl ll CASI HISTORY / three-dimensional i • 
./ $150 ad investment wt V. HO in sales when 

through thra ond announcements 

Jubilee. The Saturday morning 

er's • ritn the script and pro] ided h 

partment with Weekly sales returns 

week ad EUis P 

Camera department is- more than please,! with TCSU 
\\ 111 N I - e. N. "V PROCR \M 



SPECIALTY/Watches 

SPONSOR I 

i \l'-l LE CASI HISTORY 1 he 

jewelry store in i 

busim on tr. Prciious mi 

sisted mainh 
1 12 conse* ut 
drama 

ad hue' ■ the 

$105-a-weeii show. Tht lion commercials 

If yler watch • 
Bands 



kiim tv. a 



PROGRAM: P 



SPONSOR 



5 .i \\i \ry 1951 



Issued every 6 months 



SPONSOR INDEX 



JUNE THROUGH DECEMBER 1956 



2ND HALF VOLUME lO 



Advertising Agencies 

R. MacDonaki, Guild, Bascom & Bonfigli, profile 

Agency role in marketing 

Charles Miller, C. L. Miller Co., profile ___. 

Perspective on the 15% commission system 

E. J. Owens, Kudner Agency, profile 

Agency "wooded nook" sessions 

Donald D. Stauffer, SSCB, profile 

Where admen meet to eat 



Robert Carney, Foote, Cone & Belding, profile.. 
D. Fulmer, Guild, Bascom & Bonfigli, profile 

Do clients use agency marketing services? 

JWT's traveling tv producers 

James Bealle, Kenyon & Eckhardt, profile _ 

Agency return to tv program control 

How BBDO uses radio today 

Barton Cummings, Compton Advtg., profile 

Newsmaker: Hal Davis, Grey Advtg. 

J. David Danforth, BBDO, profile 

Newsmaker: Ben Duffy, BBDO „ 

Newsmaker: James Ellis, Kudner Agency 

Agency of 1966: a fact-oriented organization .... 

Chester La Roche, Sr., Y&R, profile 

Top 50 air agencies 



Tribute to Ben Duffy: Foreman 

Grey switches to all-media buying 

Leo Burnett's new offices inspire creativity ... 

Edward H. Mahoney, C&W, profile 

Agency party: the Christmas ball of wax 

Fred Flanagan. Kenyon & Eckhardt, profile _ 



9 July 
23 July 

23 July 
6 Aug. 
6 Aug. 

20 Aug. 
20 Aug. 

3 Sept. 
17 Sept. 

1 Oct. 

1 Oct. 

1 Oct. 
15 Oct. 
27 Oct. 
27 Oct. 

3 Nov. 
17 Nov. 
17 Nov. 

24 Nov. 
1 Dec. 
1 Dec. 
1 Dec. 
8 Dec. 

15 Dec. 
15 Dec. 
15 Dec. 
15 Dec. 
22 Dec. 
29 Dec. 



p. 48 
p. 29 



72 
27 
60 



p. 34 

p. 80 

p. 32 

p. 68 



28 
33 
42 
78 
27 
30 



p. 50 
p. 5 



48 
5 
5 

25 
44 
23 



p. 18 

p. 27 

p. 36 

p. 58 

p. 29 

p. 54 



Automotives 

Mr. Sponsor: Kenneth Zonsius, Goodyear Tire 6 Aug. p. 22 

Mr. Sponsor: Charles Kreisler, auto dealer 20 Aug. p. 26 

Detroit's spot strategy outdated, Part I 15 Oct. p. 30 

Detroit's spot strategy outdated. Part II 27 Oct. p. 38 

Mr. Sponsor: Wendell D. Moore, Dodge .... 27 Oct. p. 48 

\\ 03 Dodge is wild about Welk __ 10 Nov. p. 30 

Dodge colossal commercials unveil new car 24 Nov. p. 30 

Mi. Sponsor: Edward Ragsdale, Buick Motors 24 Nov. p. 52 



Sponsor asks: when should laic night radio & tv 

be used? 20 Aug. 

A sponsor's lot not a happy one: Foreman . __ 3 Sept. 

10 midwinter show headaches to lick: Part II 3 Sept. 

How to make spot radio, tv easier to buy 17 Sept. 

NBC Spot Sales initiates radio-phonic buying 17 Sept. 

Sponsor asks: what constitutes market saturation? 17 Sept. 

Rediscovery of network radio 1 Oct. 

General Sarnoff: 20th century prophet 1 Oct. 

Station reps' role: Weed Co. spotlighted 1 Oct. 

Trade press thrives on gossip: Foreman 15 Oct. 

Can Presley, rock 'n roll sell teen market? 15 Oct. 

Newsmaker: Oliver Treyz, TvB 15 Oct. 

Newsmaker: Leonard Goldenson, ABC 27 Oct. 

The first Mr. Sponsor: Cameron Hawley 27 Oct. 

Top 100 advertisers: 1946-1956 ... 27 Oct. 

Sponsor asks: are box-top offers effective? 27 Oct. 

10th Anniversary section: A decade of sponsor 27 Oct. 

Newsmaker: Albert Frey, Dartmouth College 3 Nov. 

Radio tune-in, audience composition chart 3 Nov. 

RAB Clinic highlights increased radio use 3 Nov. 

Sponsor asks: how can alternating sponsors avoid 

friction? 3 Nov. 

Newsmaker: Merle Jones, CBS TV . 10 Nov. 

Sponsor asks: should sponsors use company names 

in show titles? 10 Nov. 

Are spot radio $ figures by company on way? 17 Nov. 

Top 200 spot tv advertisers, 3rd quarter 1956 17 Nov. 

Is adjacency protection obsolete? 17 Nov. 

Yesterday's ugly duckling: spot radio 24 Nov. 

Sponsor asks: what questions would you ask TvB's 

Ramac? 24 Nov. p. 50 

On point-of-sale promotions: Csida . 1 Dec. p. 18 

The pros & cons of merchandising 1 Dec. p. 32 

Sponsor asks: are there too many "contributors" to 

tv show production? 8 Dec. 

Sponsors don't want Cadillacs for Christmas 15 Dec. 

Robert Sarnoff charts future of NBC ..... 15 Dec. 

4 A test: media strategy for Tetley tea: Part I 15 Dec. 

Sponsor asks: outlook for spot radio in 1957? 15 Dec. 

1 A test: media strategy for Tetley: Part II 22 Dec. 

sponsor previews 1957 radio 'tv event- . 29 Dec. 

Radio results: capsule case histories . 29 Dec. 

1956 summed up: sponsor's evaluation 29 Dec. 

Newsmaker: Frank Headley, H-R Reps ... 29 Dec. 

NBC 30th anniversary: Csida 29 Dec. 



p- 


78 


p- 


10 


p- 


34 


p- 


34 


p- 


39 


p. 


66 


p. 


38 


p- 


40 


p- 


45 


p- 


8 


p- 


32 


p- 


131 


p. 


6 


p- 


35 


p- 


40 


p- 


54 


p- 


99 


p- 


4 


p. 


26 


p- 


33 


p. 


48 


p- 


5 


p- 


44 


p. 


28 


p- 


32 


p- 


38 


p. 


23 



P- 


42 


P- 


30 


P- 


32 


P- 


39 


P- 


52 


P. 


32 


P- 


34 


P- 


37 


P- 


25 


P- 


5 


P- 


18 



Broadcast Advertising Problems & Developments 

Spot radio S: SRA totals by month 9 July p. 

Trends to watch from Fall Facts Basics 9 July p. 

Tv adjacency protection problem: Foreman 6 Aug. p. 

Will video tape eliminate DST muddle? 6 Aug. p. 

10 midwinter show headache- to lick : Part 1 __ 20 Aug. p. 

Reps today : profiling kat/ \gcncy services 20 Aug. p. 

Top 200 spot tv advertisers, 2nd quarter 1956 20 Vug. p. 



25 
30 
10 
II 
29 
38 
40 



Commercials & Sales Aids 

Copywriter delivers for news analyst Freeman 

Sponsor asks: what are fall trends for film com- 
mercial-' 

How to profit from local radio personalities 

Sponsor ask-: advice from producers to admen 

Ci wax- to present tv commercial to the client 



9 July p. 34 



9 Julv 


P- 


38 


23 July 


p. 


36 


23 July 


P- 


64 


3 Sept. 


P- 


38 



48 



SPONSOR 



5 JANUARY 1957 



Sponsoi i-k-: how i" extend life "i t\ commi, 
Tim> man) commercials spoil the i* in. I 

Sponsoi .i-k- foi i ..|i\ point) I I 1 1 : 

■ ii .1 1 \ -I- lit lilm mill, i.il 

Sponsoi u-k-: how does commercial impact 

h itli am I ii n. • reai ii. .11 to program ' 17 M 

Jingles toda) aren'l cleat <•< catch] Foreman 
( ..-I anal) lis •■! animated comma • ial 

Top In i.i.l mmen ials •■! 1956: Pari I 

Top Hi h n. m m- 1. i.il- ..i 19 •<■ Pari II 29 Di 



Pol. I 

V loo 
Politii 
Sboul 

Did i. hi ;■ 
























\\ li.it agencies expecl from film i luci 9 July p 

Complaints from buyer to — « ■ 1 1 • - 1 Foreman lul] p. » 

llnll\» I no threat t" i\ Elm: < sida IT Sepl ; 

Hollywood features go to i\ : < sida I i >i i ; 

Hollyw I features' impact on i\ 15 

Guilds dela) release ->t post-'48 films: ' sida I No> 

Feature film won't hurl networks: Foreman In Nov. p. \u 

Features not hurting syndicated film I Di 

Feature film ratings: h"» g I? 11 Dec, 



Proijr.imini; 

r WEMP, WX1> 

\\ ■-M I \ - promol 

l ' 

S 

' 

l 

I 






Foods & Beverages 

B&M 9 months after i\ test campaign 

( ampbell Soup's 25 yeai - on .iir 

km.:-' \\ ines .i liii iMi radio 

Salad firm builds on local t\ 

Welch's Drink widens market via t\ S n< 

Freirich Meat proves small advertise! can use i\ 

Faygo's I ptown Lemon Drink uses tv humor 

ReaLemon merchandises to grocei & consumer on 

radio 

Newsmaker: Dick Hehman, Pabsl Brev 
Mr. Sponsor: Frank Gorman, Nehi I 
Newsmaker: Maur) Malin, Ralston-Purina 
National Brewing's public service campaign 



23 July 


P. 


ll 




P- 




20 Vug. 


P- 




- 


P. 




1 Oct. 


P- 






P- 




24 Nov. 


P- 






P- 


28 




P. 






P. 


It 


22 Di 


P- 




29 Dec. 


I'- 





Research 

1 1 . \ I; I 

m;i 

tific medi i 

How to ii-> NCS N 
Blair d 
Hoopi ■ ! ' 



Special Issues & Sections 



Miscellaneous Products 



Full I I 

Fifth anno 
Fifth anni 































28 



























Mi. v p.in-i>r: James Shapiro, Simplicity Pattern 

Orkin Exterminating sloughs bugs on t\ 

Mr. Sponsor: J. W. Peterson, I . S. Tobacco • o. 

R rnolds Metals sells consumer, industr) .m tv 

Brylcreem doubles sales via late-nighl movies 

Flav-R-Stravi rides t\ tiger 

I \ - II- toys for Darling ston - 

Woolworth chain: net r.i.lin radical 

Lanvin: perfume & politics brew 

Mr. Sponsor: Man Garrett, Imer. Tobacco 

Investor Magazine uses classical music 

III i uses loi a] radio S tv 



Mr. Sponsor: Emanuel Goren, Lehn & Fink 
Humpty-Dumpt) Spnnkts. build local film show 
I .i-\ Glamur uses hard-sell on spot radio 
Mr. Sponsor: NX. Sheaffer II. Sheaffer Pen 
Mr. Sponsor: Harr) Patterson, Seaboard Drug 
Helene ( lurtis expands « ith net t\ 
Westinghouse makes comeback after -trikc 
l.'\ Council's i\ baby: "Toyland Express" 
Riviera Sofa spends $100,000 for spectacular 
1 . S. Steel's Operation Snowflake a.l-l- ra>l i- > 
VM1' commercials use prett) ::irl- 
Southern Calif. Plastering Inst, dramatizes - 
on ra.li.. 8 i\ 

Newsmaker: Roger Whitman, Bristol-Myers 

Mr. Sponsor: Archie Mishkin, Bayuk • igars 



9 Jul) 


P- 




9 July 


p- 




23 July 


P- 




23 Jul) 


P- 




23 July 


P- 






P- 






P- 


111 




P- 




20 Vug. 


P- 




- 


P- 




- 


P- 




- 


P- 


to 


- 


P- 




- 


P- 




- 


P- 


H 




P- 






P- 






P- 






P- 






P- 




' N 


P- 




\ 


P- 




1 Dei - 








P- 






P- 






P- 





Television 

ii/.- nn t\ nan 

..in 

Net i^ 
Tv's ■ 

inr-1 

• _:ht jii-t 
Did t 

I 5.A. 

S 



Timebuying 
Selling 

Briil- V- furthi 
What ' 



















8 











































































- 



SPONSOR 



5 jani un L951 






SPONSOR ASKS 



What are the biggest untapped sources of tv money 

which will be developed by the networks in 1957 mm 




Edward F. Lethen, Jr., manager of net- 
work sales development, CBS TV 

During 1957, network television will 
continue to grow. It is my belief that 
increases in billing this year will be as 
great as they were in 1956. Experi- 
ence in radio, magazines and news- 
paper fields as well as in television, 
show that media which have rapidly 
growing circulations attract advertis- 



"a bigger 
job to do" 




ers. As they attract advertisers, the 
amount of billing grows through use 
by new advertisers and increased use 
by old ones. 

Television audiences are still grow- 
ing rapidly. The average network 
evening program reached over a mil- 
lion more homes per broadcast in the 
the first part of 1956 than in the same 
period of 1955, with an increase of 17 
per cent. Week-day daytime programs 
showed an increase of 21 per cent and 
week-end daytime programs increased 
23 per cent. 

Where is this increased money com- 
ing from? From two sources, I think. 
The first source is the current network 
television advertisers who are enjoy- 
ing increased sales and higher profits 
partly because of the use of this me- 
dium. Next year they'll spend more 
on network television because they 
have a bigger job to do. 

The second source of possible con- 
tributors to next year's increase in net- 
work television billings are those ad- 
vertisers who normally spend a very 
small percentage of sales on advertis- 
ing. Many of these have discovered 



that by buying network television, they 
can make a profitable investment. 

A recent analysis of the top 100 cor- 
porations shows that 15 spent less 
than one-tenth of one per cent of their 
sales on advertising. These companies 
with relatively low advertising budgets 
constitute a tremendous untapped 
source of network television funds, 
and I'm of the opinion that many of 
them will start using it during 1957. 
Many of these advertisers who have a 
very low ratio of sales have very high 
ratios of sales-cost to manufacturing- 
cost. More and more manufacturers 
are discovering that large amounts of 
money spent in advertising reduce the 
total cost to the consumer by approxi- 
mately r one-half. The saving is much 
greater than the money national adver- 
tisers spend to push the products to 
the consumer. This distribution les- 
son is being learned by many other 
industries, and is sure to result in the 
increased use of network television ad- 
vertising during 1957. 



Robert Mc Fay den, manager, sales and 
mechandising plans, NBC TV 

We believe very r strongly that indus- 
trial advertisers — most of whom have 
not been aggressive advertisers or 
broadcast users — will be turning more 
and more to tv. As such companies 
expand and diversify in the econonn . 
their traditional communications forms 
(trade papers and business magazines) 
are no longer adequate. Tv can per- 
form superbly the needed "humaniz- 
ing'' job, can build a corporate face, 
can reach such important interest 
groups as investors, the labor market, 
opinion leaders, government, plant 
communities and others. In today's 
economy and society, it's not enough 
for major industrial firms to confine 
"sell" to purchasing agents; the\ ve 
got to look be\ ond and invest in their 



future with advertising dollars as well 
as with new plants and equipment. 

Television is doing such a job for 
U. S. Steel, General Electric, Johns- 
Manville and others. New industrial 
firms are sure to follow as the medi- 
um becomes more flexible in sales pat- 
terns and widens its selection of pro- 
graming. In the 1956 season alone, 
some significant newcomers have 
swelled the ranks of industrial con- 
verts — Union Carbide. American Can. 




"build a 

corporate face' 



Kaiser Aluminum. Minneapolis-Honey - 
well, Sperry Rand and Hyatt. More 
will follow. 

Elsewhere there are clear indications 
of new business from the fields of soft 
goods and insurance. Tv is learning 
how to give the apparel and textile ad- 
vertiser the local store tie-ins and mer- 
chandising so necessary to the success 
of national advertising. Tailored pro- 
graming, promotion thinking and col- 
or are sure to accelerate the flow of 
such fresh money to tv. 

In 1956 NBC TV signed up John 
Hancock, Insurance Company of North 
America and Allstate. Prudential. Mu- 
tual of Omaha and State Farm: net- 
work television is building a strong 
nucleus of support from this field. 



Donald Coyle, director of tv saJes de- 
velopment and research, ABC TV 
Three targets are certain to be given 
special attention: 

Target 1. We. like our competitors, 



50 



SPONSOR 



5 JANUARY 1957 



realize the impoi tan< e ol in< reasing 
the advertising base. In all, consider- 
abl) less than 2091 of all companies 
which could use 1 1 1 * - medium effective- 
ly, used network t\ in L956. [Tie re- 
maining 8095 is .m important target 
area which must I"- approached. 

\\ c alread) note thai participation 
programs are opening t\ vistas to 
nunc smallei advertisers. Networks 
liu\c increased their flexibility in ordei 
tu accommodate advertisers heretofori 
unable to purchase network i\ . 

Institutional advertisers have also 
been flocking to video. \i the oppo- 
site pole »>f advertising approaches, 



-tin 







central targets' 



the retailer will also increase bis use 
of the medium. New marketing and 
distribution problems demand elec- 
tronic selling for the outlet no less 
than the product. 

Another obvious pool to be tapped 
in this target area is the new products 
American industry is devising. The 
many new "miracle" and "conven- 
ience products — needing mass ex- 
posure with tremendous impact, in a 
hurry will turn to tv. which has 
proven its phenomenal effectiveness in 
putting across a new item. 

Target 2. Current advertisers will 
provide new money, too, just as the 

best car prospects are car-owner-. Thus 
we expect automotive advertisers, see- 
ing the effectiveness of t\. to increase 
their investment in television. So, look 
to current advertisers both in the auto- 
motive field and other industries t" 
step up their use of the medium. 

Target 3. New monej will be brought 
into network television because of the 
emergence of UJC T\ as a new majoi 
advertising force. 

New money will flow to t\ because 
ill network revenue has been 
ploughed back into improvements 
making it an ever-more-pov. erful sales 
foree: and (2) advertisers have he- 
come better educated to using tv for 
maximum effectiveness. The results: 
1 ( >3, will be television's biggest \ear — 
until 1958. ^ 




CUTTING A FINE FIGURE . . . 

In Portland, Maine Pulse area study Nov 11 17 WCSH TV LEADS 
365 QUARTER HOURS TO 78 

Yes, dependable Channel 6 improves with age in full time viewer 
acceptance. 

Compare quarter-hour leadership figures of |unc ARB and November 
• Pulse 1956 





Monday thru Friday 




WCSH-TV 


Sto B 


7:00-12 Noon 


June 


675 


3? 5 






Nov. 


85 


15 


12 Noon-6:00 


June 


85.5 


345 




Sunday thru Saturday 


Nov 


no 


10 








6:00-1 1:00 p.m. 


June 


M 


76 






Nov. 


105 


34 1 tic 


Saturday 










10:45-6:00 


June 


18 


I 1 




9.30-6:00 


Nov. 


27 


6 1 f.c 




Sunday 










1 1:30-6:00 


June 


:* 







12:00-6:00 


Nov. 


16 


8 



































PORTLAND, MAINE 




Affiliate 



WEED TELEVISION 
Representatives 



it* 5 



SPONSOR 



5 .1 \\l \K\ 195" 










o 

w 



< 

M 

a 
o 
s 



(A 

o 

w 



e 



cost per thousand is 
49% lower than its 
closest rival. 




delivers 5.3 average 
between 8 and 6. No 
ratings below 4.0. 
Pulse: June-July '56 




covers what counts! 
800,000 people in half 
millivolt contour. 
550,000 of them are 
in Franklin County . . . 
the home county. 



I 



Columbus, Ohio 

the station with 
a personality. 



ikBihMB-iwk 



52 






r. Sponsor 



Waverly P. Hays: a fisherman's luck 

\^lu>c to throe and a half decades ago, \\a\erl\ Ha\s set out lo 
be a fanner. Today he's manager of advertising and promotion 
for the Ralston Division of Ralston-Purina in' St. Louis with the 
ies|)onsihilit\ of allocating and supervising a s 7 million ad and 
promotion budget. He's stayed close to the consumer in his adver- 
tising thinking throughout his 32 years with the company. 

Hays' philosophy of advertising boils down to the following: "All 
advertising, whether air or print, must show some tangible con- 
sumer benefits. Our copj approach is always 'reason why'." 

Prior to 1 December \')r>(>. Ha\s applied this thinking to the sell- 
ing and advertising of the firm's feed products. Todaj he directs 
the advertising for the grocery products' agency: Guild. Bascom \ 




'.Ao premiums in our package — ju.st good products" 



Bonfigli, San Francisco). These products include Ry-Krisp, Rice 
Chex, Wheat Chex. Instant Ralston, Regular Ralston. Tv spear- 
head of activities for the grocery line is Bold Journey. ABC I \ . 
Mondays 7:30-8:00 p.m. in 67 markets. 

Both the choice of programing and the appeal of the light, soft- 
sell commercials are in line with an entire new marketing approach 
in selling Ralston-Purina cereals: The company s after long-neg- 
lected adult consumers who've been decreasing their consumption 
of cereals since diet-consciousness began in the Twenties. 

"In advertising our grocery products."' sa\s I lavs, "we deal with 
such benefits as taste and pleasure of eating. I think that's wh\ we 
have more than a plus factor in our marketing strategy of break- 
fast cereals — no premiums in our package but just chock full of 
good products." 

The GB&B-crested commercials keep up a light mood with their 
s] f of premiums plus catchy praise of the product flavor. 

When Havs is awa\ from the sales charts and advertising meet- 
ings, be likes to take off on lake fishing expeditions in Minnesota. 
Before his two sons grew up, he used to take them along with him. 

"Fishing's like advertising," he says. "No one can predict with 
assurance that any tv program or radio schedule will be a hit. ^ ou 
can't tell what size fish vou'll catch with your bait either." ^ 



SPONSOR 



.") .1 \M ARV 1957 







\t 



et^ 



e^' 







/ 



J> I //• » . ' » 







n 



VOU CAN BUY 

FAN IN THE STANDS" 



\\5 min, preceding Worm-Up") 



MINUTE 

jbet. ' Fan in the Stonds " ond "Worm-Up ) 



"WARM-UP" (ten minutes) 



MINUTE (bet. "Worm-Up ond Gome") 

CO-SPONSORSHIP OF GAME ^St>l»jOJ 

MINUTE (bet. Gome ond "Tenth Inning") 

"TENTH INNING" 

ORIOLES "NEST" 

HOT STOVE CORNER 

PAUL RICHARDS SPEAKS 



WBAL 



ORIOLE 

BIG LEAGUE 

BASEBALL 




NOW ON POWERFUL 

50,000 WATT 

WBAL 

Baseball will be bigger than ever this yearl I'-. 
single Oriole Game will !><• broadcast on M 
land's BIG STATION— .">o.(km) watt WBA1 
Coverage will be far and wide all over Maryland 
and surrounding states, too. One-haH of each 
game is being sponsored b) Gunthei 1 Von 

c an get your product into each game — if you a< t 
at once! Call WBAL or an\ Christal office soon ' 



1090 ON YOUR DIAL • 50,000 WATTS 

Nationally represented by HENRY I CHRISTAL CO 



SPONm'K 



5 JAM ARY 195. 






A weekly listing of changes 

in the advertising and broadcast fields 



I 



^ NEW AND RENEW 



NEW ON RADIO NETWORKS 



SPONSOR 

Carter Products. NY 



Ex-Lax, NY 



AGENCY 

Kastor, Farrell, Chesley & 

Clifford 
Warwick & Lcglcr, NY ... NBC 190 



STATIONS PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

MBS Gabriel Heatter; M-F 7:40-7:45 pm; 31 Dec 



.Five Star Matinee; Tu & Th 3-3:30 pm; announcements; 31 
Dec; 52 wks 

Warwick & Legler, NY NBC 190 Monitor; 8 announcements per weekend: 31 Dec; 52 wks 

Warwick & Legler, NY NBC 190 Pepper Young's Family; M-W-F 3:45-4 pm; announcements; 

31 Dec; 52 wks 
Warwick & Legler, NY NBC 190 Woman in My House; M-W-F 4-4:15 pm; announcements; 

31 Dec; 52 wks 
Lambert & Fealsey, NY NBC 190 _ Bandstand; M-F 10:05-11 am & 11:05-12 n; 10 parties; 7 

Jan; 13 wks 
NBC 190 Woman in My House; M-F 4-4:15 pm; 5 parties; 7 Jan; 13 

wks 

National Labor Management Foundation, Chi Bertram J. Hauser, NY MBS Partners in Progress; Su 5:45-6 pm ; 6 Jan 

Olin-Mathieson, NY Van Sant. Dugdale. Bait NBC 190 Monitor; 10 weather segs per weekend; 21 Sept, 1957; 6 wks 

Pharma-Cratt, Batavia, III JWT, Chi NBC News of the World; M-F 7:30-7:45 pm; parties; 31 Dec; 

52 wks 
Sterling Drug, NY Carl S. Brown, NY MBS Parallels in the News; M-F 11:10-11:15 am; 1 Jan 



Ex-Lax, NY 
Ex-Lax, NY 

Ex-Lax, NY 

Lambert Pharmacal Division, NY 

Lambert Pharmacal Division, NY Lambert & Fealsey, NY 



BROADCAST INDUSTRY EXECUTIVES 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Same, eastern sis mgr 

Same, gen mgr 

KXJB-TV, Valley City, ND, regional sis service mgr 

KBMB-TV, Bismarck. ND, mgr 

KMPC. LA, dir programing 

NBC, NY, dir program planning & devel, NBC owned stns 



Hugh D. Allen, Jr Lang-Worth Feature Programs, NY, dir west coast opera- Same, nat sis mgr 

tions __ 

Bruce Bryant CBS Tv Spot Sales, NY, acct exec 

Bob Chrystie WPAL, Charleston, SC, sis mgr 

Fred Drewry KBMB-TV, Bismarck, ND, commercial mgr _ _ 

Frank E. Fitzsimonds _ KFYR radio & tv, Bismarck. ND, vp 

Robert Forward 

Ceorge A. Heinemann . WRCA-TV, NY, program mgr 

Charles Johnson KSFO, SF. acct exec ... KVSM, San Mateo, sis mgr 

J. Wallace Kelly U. S. Ceneral Accounting Office, supervisory auditor.... _ Westinghouse Broadcasting Co, NY, staff asst to auditor 

Richard M. Klaus WERE, Cleve, gen mgr Same, also vp 

Joe Kronovich WCCO-TV, Minneapolis, sis staff WTCN (radio), Minneapolis, local acct exec 

C. O. Langlois, Sr. Lang-Worth Feature Programs, NY, bd chairman 

John D. Langlois Lang-Worth Feature Programs, NY, sec-treasurer Same, pres 

Ed Lieberthal Dumont net, NY, program operations mgr Barry & Enright Productions. NY, program operations mgr 

Ted Lord Outdoor Advertising, asst to pres Daniel Starch, Mamaroneck, NY, acct exec 

Robert W. Miller KOOL-TV, Phoenix, asst sis mgr Same, sis mgr 

Richard K. Millison Portland Oregonian, Portland. Ore, promotion & research dir KRTV, Hillsboro. Ore, mgr 

Ralph Radetsky ...Ford Foundation, NY KOA'tvl, Denver, asst gen mgr 6 tv station mgr 

Larry Shields XETV, San Diego, sis mgr KMOD, Modesto, Cal, local sis mgr 

Rick Sklar WINS. NY, copywriter Same, promotion mgr 

Charles S. Steinberg Warner Bros, NY, home office publicity mgr CBS Radio, NY, dir audience promotion 

Judd Sturtevant KMOD, Modesto, Cal, sis mgr _ Same, nat sis mgr 

Bert West KNX, LA, gen mgr _. KSFO, SF, asst gen mgr & sis mgr 

Mary Ellen Wheeling Mottle & Siteman, LA, media dir M. B. Scott. LA, media dir 



ADVERTISING AGENCY PERSONNEL CHANGES 



NAME 

Thomas E. Armstrong 

William Haughey 

Roy Van Hook 

Robert S. McTyre 

Leroy F. Porter 

Walter E. Rahel 
Jay Richards 
Lester A. Swenson 

W. Robert Woodburn 

Robert W. Young, Jr. 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



Ingalls-Miniter, Boston, vp & gen mgr 
Harris D. McKinney, Phila, copy chief 



Cardner Advertising, St. Louis, acct exec 
Harris D. McKinney, Phila. client service div 



K&E, NY, acct exec 

Campbell-Ewald, Detroit, creative writer, r-tv dept . 

K&E, NY, acct super 



NEW AFFILIATION 

Campbell-Ewald. Detroit, r-tv copy group super 

Ingails-Miniter-Haughey, Boston, same also partner 

Same, also member bd 

Campbell-Ewald, DetToit. asst r-tv copy chief & group super 

Same, acct exec. Pet-Ritz Foods Div, Pet Milk Co 

Same, also member bd 

Same, also vp 

Kennedy, Walker & Wooten, Beverly Hills, acct exc 

Same, writer-producer, r-tv dept 
Same, also vp 



SPONSOR PERSONNEL CHANGES 



NAME 

6 A. Bouchard 
Leslie C. Bruce, Jr. 
Henry Dorff 
James D. Grant 
H. A. Lehrter 
Robert J. Ritchey 
|ohn Vccklcy 
Francis R. Wilcox .. 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



Mars. Inc. gen sis mgr 
.Purex Corp, brand advtng mgr 
.Hartmann Luggage, chg of advtng 
.Landers Frary & Clark, sis promotion mgr 
_Mars, Inc, dir mktng research 
.US Steel Corp, mkt devel mgr 
.US Steel Corp. asst advtng dir 
.Sunkist Growers, asst mgr 



NEW AFFILIATION 

.Same, vp, dir of sis 

Same, dir advtng — Manhattan Soap Co div 

Lewyt Corp, advtng mgr 

Ronson Corp, shaver product mgr 
.Same, gen advtng mgr 
.Same, mgr advting & sis prom — steel homes div 

Same, dir advtng div 

Same, gen mgr 



".1 



SPONSOR 



5 JANUARY 1957 



Motional <tn<l u gional 

in work ni"< 01 recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, Mich., is considering I. vValtei Thomp- 
— « » i • agenc) recommendation f « > i Bpol h on behalf of its trucks. I •■ 

cision i- expected tlii- week. Recommendation ia undersl I to 

covei some 200 national markets, with time foi one minute pei 
week per market in prime time paid for from co-op advertising fund 
(to which both parent companj and dealers contributi Recom- 
mendation waa made on basis "I 7 to 9 p.m. | ><• i i < >• I and 52-week 
schedule. Co-op mone) ia administered bj l\\ I in New ^ork. 
i liiti buj ••! there is llnth Jones. 

RADIO BUYS 

Lever Bros., New ^ > >rk. for its Breeze, will complement it- partial 
sponsorship ol a CBS Radio network daytime lineup with Bpol an- 
nouncements in iih >r »■ than .~>o markets starting 1 I In u i' In-and- 
out pattern includes an average of 15 daytime minutes weekl) f"i a 
Icilal ol 1<> weeks. di\ided so air schedules are on for foul weeks, 
(hen olT for four. Objective: to reach women during peak daytime 
tune-in periods in the Monda) through Fridaj -pan. with a beavying 

Dp toward the end of the week. Maikel lisl supplements the 125 

station network. Buying is incomplete. Agency: r>l!l><>. New York. 
Buyers: Douglaa Yates and Carrie Senatore. 

Hudson Pulp & Paper Corp., New York, i- considering buyii 
radio campaign in markets East of the Mississippi on behali of it- 
toilet tissue. It- been beav) in spot t\ heretofore. Vgency: Nor- 
man, Craig S Kurnmel. Buyer: Jeanne Sullivan. 

National Carbon Co., division ol 1 nion Carbide and t arbon, New 
^i oik. moves into more than 2i><) markets -\ January with a tentative 
duration of 1"> weeks planned. The pattern: mostl) minute- during 

earl] morning breakfast period and at peak driving time dui 
traffic hours. Campaign is national in scope, covering the South 
a- well as Northern market- foi Evereadj batteries. Announcements 
will be transcribed and the frequency range will be from Eve to 1" 
weekl) per station. Client is changing it- earliei station lineup in 
some case- and is adding new market-. Vgem j : \\ illiam I -t\. Ni 
York. Buyer: Tom McCabe. 

TV & RADIO BUYS 

New England Confectionery Co. (Nei imbridge. Mass., 

for its Skybar cand) bar, moves into it- home territory, the N( 
England states, with a combination -pot ilri\e in mid-January. 
Details have not been finalized, but it'- expected that - ribed 

minutes will he used in radio, filmed minute- and 20's in tv. with 
some lit markets and two or three stations per market. Buyin] 

not complete. Vgency: (". .1. LaRoche, New York. Buyer: 1* 
Gould. 






NIELSEN 

SURVEY 

shows you why . . . 

KANV is THE Station 
to reach the rich 
NEGRO Market in 
The Sbreveport Area 



Check these facts 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 



6. 
7. 



Over 36°o of the area popu 
lation is negro. 

There are 119,910 radio 

homes in the KANV Af 

43,167 Negro Radio H»mcs m 
the KANV Arc.i 36° ). 

KANV is the ONLY ALL NE 
CRO PROGRAM Station h 

KANV's MONTHLY COVER 
ACE is 16,940 homes 

reached 

. . . or QUmLi " 0T • 1 " Tnc 
negro radio homes. 

Negroes here have higher th.m 
nvcr.iqc incomes. 

KANV Rates arc low. 



lalrtl / - < . 



( - \.. 1 l-i -f. 



IT ADDS UP TO THIS: 

If you want hard-sell, low 
cost, saturated coverage of this 
rich negro market. . . . KANV 
is YOUR station. 

Proof o» rhu 
Sponsor? not only renew b. • c©»- 

trjcM' 



CjII the KANV K ■: 







1050 kc - 250 Wotto - DAYTIME 
fftt Mf ML mm mUAM Sbtm m 

SHREVEP0RT, LOUISIANA 



SPONSOR 



5 JANUARY 1957 






Digest of the ueek's developments 
in advertising and the air media 



News and Idea WRAP-UP 



ADVERTISERS 

A test to determine the effective* 
ness of combined newspaper-air 
media advertising as against radio- 

tv advertising alone is being con- 
ducted li\ Manischewitz Win**. The 
wine company's agency, Emil Mogul 
Co., i> conducting the stud) in Syra- 
cuse. Toledo. Allentown and Norfolk. 
The plan calls for weekl) newspaper 
ads of 450 to 1.500 lines to supple- 
ment current t\ -radio schedules in the 
lour cities. 

When the test ends in May, results 
will be measured against sales in four 
comparable markets using only radio- 
tv advertising. Manischewitz started 
exclusive use of air media for its basic 
national campaign last October. 



Lever Bros, is starting off the new 
year with ^ome new products and 
some new air media plans. New prod- 
ucts include Gay-La, a translucent face 
soap, being test marketed in up-state 
New York as well as other markets; 
Liquid Spry for which Lever is asking 
about daytime tv availabilities in four 
Vlidwesl markets: Stripe, the new 
toothpaste for children, which has al- 
ready been reported testing in San 
Diego. New air media plans: Lever 
is considering using t\ spot in the Mid- 
ui^l for the first time. 

Il<in/ 57 Varieties will u>e 1057 as 
a special promotional year. The coin- 
cidence of numbers is a natural. Pro- 
motion started with 400 institutional 
spots on 88 tv stations on New Year's 
Day. 

AGENCIES 

Emil Mofjul Co. is proof that a small 
agenc) with a lot of push can fight it > 
way up. Year-end report from Mogul 
shows billings at almost SlO million 
Eoi L956. Billings target for I960 is 
double the present figure. Mogul also 
announced election of three vice presi- 



dents. The) are: Jules l.ennard. di- 
rector of marketing and merchandis- 
ing: Joel L. Martin, director of media 
and research, and Leslie L. Dunier. 
director of radio-tv. 



Arthur Grossman Advertising, Chi- 
cago, has consolidated with Donahue 
X Coe under the name of the latter 
agency. Combined hillings should run 
about $32 million. . . . Sink & Sons 
Advertising agency has just opened 
in Charlotte, N. C. 

New agency appointments: Ruth- 
rauff & Ryan has been appointed to 
handle the Flav-R-Straws account. . . . 
Paris & Peart has been appointed to 
handle advertising for Re-Dan Pack- 
ing Co., makers of Cadet Dog Food. 

The League of Advertising Agen- 
cies has elected its 1957 officers. Lester 
Harrison of Lester Harrison. Inc. is 
the new president. Another new offi- 
cer is Philip I. Ross. The following 
1956 officers will continue to ser\e in 
'57; Julian Ross, executive secretars : 
Ben M. Reiss and Larry Schwartz, 
v.p.'s; Nat Roth, treasurer: Louis N. 
Field and Morton J. Simon, legal coun- 
sel; Lucius H. Coleman, fiscal advisor; 
and Bosh Stack, public relations coun- 
sel. 

REPS 

Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc., 

has been appointed to represent 
\\ ROC-TV, Rochester, N. Y. The an- 
nouncement was made at sponsor's 
presstime by David C. Moore. Trans- 
continent Television Corp., owners and 
operators of the station and \\ illiani 
Pay. WROC-TV general manager. \n 
"SBC affiliate, it has served the Roches- 
ter market since 1949. 

PCW has made immediate plans for 
detailed market and station studies to 
be added to its "PCW -Project Infor- 
mation" service; Rochester is one of 
the country's wealthiest communities. 



Composed of highly skilled and spe- 
cialized industries as well as vast farm 
areas, the rep said. 

John Blair & Co. has been appoint- 
ed to represent KTSA. San Antonio, 
effective 1 April, it was announced 
by Gordon McLendon, president of the 
station. It was the second McLendon 
station within a week to name Blair 
its rep. Last week, KLIP. Dallas 
joined the Blair list. KTSA is a 5 kw 
outlet on 550 KC. non-directional, dav- 
time. One of the oldest stations in 
Texas, it will celebrate its 35th birth- 
day in May. The manager is C. W. 
"Bill" Weaver, formerl) of WRIT. 
Milwaukee. 

TV STATIONS 

Tv applications: Between 17 and 22 
December three stations received con- 
struction permits and one application 
for a new station was filed. Construc- 
tion permitees include: Plaza Radio 
& lv Co. for Channel 26. San Francis- 
co, permit allows 275 kw \isual: 
Heart of the Black Hills Stations for 
Channel 7. Rapid City. S. I)., permit 
allows .554 kw visual: Midcontinent 
Broadcasting for Channel 6. Reliance, 
S. D., permit allows for 55.7 kw visual. 
\pplication was made by Jet Broad- 
casting. Erie, Pa., for Channel 45. 
Youngstown, 0.. 196.50 kw \ isual. 
with tower 556 feet above average ter- 
rain, plant $235,000, yearl) operating 
cost $388,800. 



KPIX's handsome new merchandising 
magazine, "Pre-Sell." contains some 
original ideas. The San Francisco sta- 
tion s house organ liberallj uses one 
panel pictures from stor\ boards of 
current commercials, docs not use 
mats, proofs of ads or product pic- 
tures. "Pre-Sell" goes out to about 
7.000 advertisers, agencies, etc. It con- 
tinually stresses t\ as the prime pre- 
selling advertising media. Spot pro- 



50 



SPONSOR 



5 JANUARY 1957 



grains, spot announcements and net- 
work advertisers are highlighted in 
ih.ii order. 

K'I'I.V. Los Angeles, marks it- 10th 
anniversary on 22 January, Fne oldest 
commercial station in tin- West recent- 
U moved i" new quarters on Sunset 
Blvd. For ii- first nine years K 1 1 \ 
h as piloted l'\ 1 1"' dynamic K laus 
Landsherg, who died .1 Few months 
back. Presentlj the station is in the 
hands "i .1 young, aggressive mana 
men I headed b) Lew Arnold, general 
manager and Henrj Flynn, assistant 
general manager. . . . WIITV, Char- 
lotte, reports <><".7 coloi sets sold in 
their area .1- ol 20 December. 

k\ M.-'l\ . Eugene, Ore., will be 
broadcasting network color as i>f '<'• 
fanuary. . . . KGW-TV, Portland, 
Ore., went on the air IT Decembei 
with the first 100,000-watl transmitter 
hooked to s I • > \n gain antenna tor bet- 
tei coverage in shadow areas. Mail 
map indicates that reception is im- 
|)iii\ ril. 

RADIO STATIONS 

Ju*t what i» a station's public 

service obligation? Wl'lli. Ubany, 
Found itseli faced with tin- question 

when il recent!] decided nol lc caii\ 

the \B(" Radio network feed of the 
Saturday afternoon Metropolitan Op- 
era broadcasts. I lie action stirred up 
a hornets nest. 

Newspaper columnists criticized the 
station for neglecting it- public serv- 
ice obligation. Letters i<> WI'IH pro- 
testing radii'- "stifling of culture" fol- 
lowed. 

Here- what the station did to coun- 
teract the chai ees : 



• [sau i.i 

11111 opera l< I tli d al 1 

in the .11. a and al ■• -1 the M< t broai 11.. II 

1 asts would n ich leaa than one halt Eyek I 

ol I ' . ol thi nillion hom< - in the mil pul 

1 1 1 1 ities 1 Uban) S< hen.-, 1 ,.i 1 . . . 

area I h< I itemenl was pi inted b) 

the < ohiinni-i- I In- station al-.. -1 it< .1 



thai if it departed from it- regulai pop 
music and iie« it, it w ould be 

doing both it- listeners and itseli 1 

.1 l-t 111. I d 1-1 I \ il 



I he III -t Vitui 

A I' 

III :• • - that ihi- 
plained bj prc-h«»lida\ »h»ppi 
Followed up the statement with ever, the nrwttp 





^^^hcwmumltip with that 



LOUISVILLE'S 



WAVE-TV 

CHANNEL 3 
FIRST IN KENTUCKY 

Affiliated with NBC 



0SP< >i - \i 1 S 



KENTUCKY FLAIR! 

Kentucky's magnificent m« - 

I l 

S 
In .1 State 1I1 ' 
tuckiatu l 

showman 
PROGRAMMING I 

\\ \ \ I 1 
COVERAGE WAVI i 

a \\ I 7 \ 
EXPERIENCE VS W ! 

pro.; 

jit the i.i 



SPONSOR 



1 .1 \m wn 195 , 



had criticized the program change 
were present and they did an about- 
face. With a now sympathetic press 
and continuation of the closed-circuit 
hroadcasts. \\ I'TK feds it is free to 
continue its popular music format 
which best serves the majority of the 
stations listeners. 



KTYL, Mesa. Ariz., gave its listeners 
a unique Christmas present. All 
through Christmas Day the station pro- 
gramed nothing but holiday music — 
no commercials and no news. The only 
announcements made were the re- 
quired hourly station identification. . . 

KITE, San Antonio, for the 10th con- 
secutive New Year's Day offered its 
unusual and thoughtful holiday gift to 
listeners — no jangling or jarring mu- 
sic and a harp intro to the news ( in 
place of the usual clanging cow hell I. 

WTAO, Boston, has turned thumbs 
down on singing station breaks, jingle 
program themes and news signatures. 
Ceneral manager Wallace Durdap feels 
the singing group belting out call let- 
ters has been overdone and says he 11 
leave jingles to ''our clients who can 
make effective use of them." . . . Plane 
traffic from the U. S. to Austria 
is getting pretty heavy with station 
newsmen. Latest to make the jaunt 
to cover the Hungarian story is Larry 
Berrill of KBIG. Catalina, Calif. . . . 

WEEI, Boston, which was the first 
station to sell a bank on the advan- 
tages of radio advertising 30 years 
ago. just signed the Merchants Na- 
tional Bank of Boston for a 52-week 



contract on CHS" Xews With Allan 
Jackson. 

Here's an idea on how to while avvav 
a good working da\ get one of 

WWj's hand wind phonographs that 
operates at 'Coffee stirring speed. 
You'll have the whole office crowding 
around, too. Incidentally, the gadget 
is a promotion piece for the Detroit 
station's new "Hi-Fi quality" trans- 
mitter. 

KOA, Denver, has just celebrated its 
30th birthday . . . KSVP, Artesia, 
New Mexico, celebrated its tenth anni- 
versary by a day-long interview with 
Joe E. Brown . . . WPAT, Paterson, 
Y J., has agreed to supply complete 
musical programs for Miami's new 
WSKP. Shows will follow WPAT style 
and feature music in the "Gaslight 
manner." 

ASSOCIATIONS 

Quality standards for film repro- 
duction by individual stations will 
be one of the major topics at the 
NARTB tv film committee meeting in 
New York on 18 January. This 
should he good news for Lever Bros., 
its agencies and the Film Producers 
Assn., all of whom have been involved 
in setting up a set of film qualit\ 
standards with Lever pressing particu- 
larh for use of 35mm by stations. 

Harold P. See of KRON-TV. San 
Francisco, has been named chairman 
of the tv film committee. Other mem- 
bers include: Elizabeth Bain. WGN- 
TV, Chicago: Joseph L. Floyd, KELO- 
TV, Sioux Falls: Gordan Gray, WOR- 
TY. New York: Elaine Phillips. 



WSPD-TV, Toledo; Kenenth I. Tred- 
well, WBTV, Charlotte; and Raymon 
Welpott. WRGB, Schenectadv. 



TvB's research committee met 3 Janu- 
ary to set general research plans for 
•t7. Projects outlined included: use 
of electronic "brains'" to help process 
information faster, new markets to be 
studied and wa\s of hetter recording 
tv dollar investment by brands. 

COMMERCIALS 

Although advertisers are not rush- 
ing into color commercials, Harris- 

Tuchman Productions notes that inter- 
est in color techniques and inquiries 
about color are steadily increasing. 
The dam max he ready to break fairly 
soon, the firm feels. 

Harris-Tuchman is the firm that 
does color commercials for the Ice 
Follies show plus 15-minute color 
films on the Follies for tv news and 
women's service shows. When one of 
the 15-minute films was played on a 
Schenectady station three years ago. 
General Electric executives saw it and 
asked for a copy. GE now uses the 
film as basic for tone values in color 
equipment tests. 



Philip Morris' color spot schedule on 
WRCA-TV, New York, and WNBQ. 
Chicago, is set for 52 weeks. I he con- 
tract for the 20-second announcement 
was set through N. W. Aver. . . . Pro- 
motion on a large seale from 
Soundac, Miami: The film outfit is 
sendins out Florida lemons the size of 




Call your WEED man or Bill Hurley, Regional Sales Manager, 754 Baker Bldg., Mi nneapolis, F e d e r ■ » 



58 



SPONSOR • 5 .i wi \m l ( ->57 



rapefi uil Foui im hes in diametei 
.iml -i\ inches long, 

NETWORKS 

"Impart Public Service* 1 is a new 
plan for M>( !-ow ned radio and i\ sta 
lions !>\ which the network hopes to 
increase its public service activities 
foi ">7 b) IV i . The program calls 
fur stations to periodicallj put theii 
lull efforts behind .1 single public 
service endeavor. In announcing the 
plan, Thomas B. McFadden, v.p. of 
MB( owned stations and Spol Sales 
-.till the all-oul endeavor would use 
vertical saturation techniques similai 
to those employed bj seasonal adver- 
tisers. "Impact Public Service" was 
devised l>\ Don Bishop, director of 
Publicit) and Communit] Sen ices foi 
the NBC-owned stations. Bishop will 
' oordinate the program. 



Specials ami spectaculars ar«- still 
rerj much alive and kirkiii" 
loungstown Kitchens will use an hour- 
long -how on \I!C T\ mi 28 \|uil to 
introduce it- new product line. The 

-linn. imerica SiiJutrs Kulr Smith, 

will pre-empt the first hour of Omnibus 
and will be seen from ( >:i>n to 10:00 
Sunda) night. Over at CBS I V . Buick 
•nid Liggett & Myers will co-sponsor .1 
90-minute spectacular starring lud\ 
Garland at the end of Februarj or the 
beginning of March. The show will be 
Been Mondaj night from 9:30 to I I :00 
and will pre-empt December Bride and 
>rti<li<> One. 



aiiolln-i- S| inilli,,,, ,,,.| ,,, ,,| N , 1 

Using eontracta. \ ■:.. rrti 1 
Motorola I Myers, N 

w'u h Pharmai si and Kiplinj ■ • \! 
sin< rh( in. 1 u i\\ iponsoi 1 new 
series to -1 irl 12 lanuarj on - 
mornings from ' • to 8 '■" \m.. 

teur Hour will do i»., 90 inuti 
shows tin- month from Miami 
VB( I \ talent show will • ■,, into the 
longei vei »ion on G md I I fanuai j . 

IVBCa new radio face will feature .1 

two-houi bloi k ..1 dramas in the 1 
r """i pro eded bj the new Bill <■ 
win Shou from I i to 2:00 p.m. 
of the drama shows are still in the 
planning stage and preaumabl) will be 
slotted in the 2:00 to 1:00 period which 
1- now -1. in. mi time. . . . \\U T\ \ 
'''<• — < onference show has moved 
1-' Sundays from 5: 10 to 6:00 p.m. 
I he program sponsored bj 1 orn Prod- 
ucts was formed) seen from 8 10 to 
9:00. 

Brown A \\ illiamson had definitel) 
bought the remaining half of NBl 
Radio - five-minute hourl) new* asts 
Bristol-Myers bought the othei half 
weeks ago. II ill" of the pai kage 1 osts 
^-'.1 million pei year, totals 2,210 five- 
minute shows 

Ml< IN"- Today •Home-Tonimhl 

shows have picked up 18 advertisers 
signing foi partii ipation s< hedulea. 
Tlii> amounts to 11.5 million gross 
revenue. . . . imazon Trader 1- tin- 
lir-i nl the new film sei it - 
duced bj Warnei Bros, under the re- 
cent VB-P I and \\ .11 nei agreen 
I he show i- -I ited i" go on next fall. 



FILM 

1 I "'• ■ - '" 1 < «>ni|,. hiiv lium 

— motion en im . id. ,1. 1 ,,., 

H 

■ ' 

I I 
to 1 

I he ii.iu. 
I'<-iii^ seen in twi 

affiliated with -1 

■ 

n f<>r 

the show in. ludea pn 

plants f..t employees li dian ' ■ 

dress and badges f..r drivi 

men, im. k post 

band; 

Zii lv \| 1 RJvkii 

I "K. thai Zii 
risen fr..m 

I 
1,180 non-4 ompi I 
involved in the 1956 figure 

I Hi' of 1 
ir-minoi ad ■ 
hered i". but in • ,,f 

clients will u 

or the othei t.ik' - .f,j,, 

for .1 number of w< • 
jure. 

Interstate I \ 

live bidd ■ handinii 

the wardrol e and pro i*- 

used in Soon, the fin 

Screen Genu 
the \ ■ 




OO 0O OO 



« Broadcasting Co.: KSJB-TV. Valley City-Fargo • KCJB-TV, Minot • KBMB-TV. Bismarck • KDIX-TV. Dickinson • KSJB. Jamestown • KCJB. Mmot 



SPONSOR • 5 .1 \M vm 1957 






approval for Doctor Mike is the first 
the AM \ lia~ given to a t\ film series. 
Keith Andes will star. 

William Tell Productions has 

signed Rohert 0- Lewis as host for 
The Hidden Treasure Show, a one- 
hour musical now being filmed. Un- 
do the show's format, home viewers 
can win prizes of S.vi.OOO. . . . AAP-'s 
pre-Warner Bros, librarj of features 
has heen sold to a total of 264 sta- 
tions. 

Ziv reports a 259? ^ a ' M >'• sponsor- 
ship of syndicated films by hanks, fi- 
nance companies and insurance firms. 

CBS Film has sold Whirlybirds in 
83 markets, including 39 to Continen- 
tal Oil via B&B. . . . Westinghouse 
Broadcasting's Ra\ Bowley said in a 
speech 29 November more distributors 
should provide broadcasters with 
prints made to t\ rather than theatre 



specifications. . . . TI'A landed Drew- 
rySj Midwestern brewer, as sponsor of 
Stage 7 in 11 market-. \\ ith Don 
Ameche signed as host, show will be 
titled Don Ameche Presents The Drew- 
rys I' lav of the Week. 

RESEARCH 

Trendex reports that their new serv- 
ices will be based on telephone infor- 
mation. The new services include audi- 
ence composition figures for specific 
programs and flow of audience meas- 
urement-. 

The flow of audience figures will be 
divided into three parts: 

I 1 l Percent of audience inherited 
from the previous program. 

l2l Percent of audience obtained 
from competing networks. 

I 3 I Percent of audience from "sets 
off." 

Trendex is increasing its half hour 



SOUND -FACTOR" 



a 



f 



<Jfi£ tz/ia/mle ci 

JrmfirmitmaMe <=Zmi t 
with 

WSRS 

ON 

GREATER CLEVELAND'S 
NUMBER, 1 STATION 



SOUND FACTOR DISCOUNT PAYABLE ONLY 

TO RECOGNIZED ADVERTISING AGENCIES 

BY WSRS, INC., CLEVELAND 18, OHIO 



sample from !!<)() to 1.000 homes with 
the inauguration of the new services. 



Dr. Sydney Roslow, director of 
Pulse, has revived the telephone \-. 
non-telephone homes measurement ar- 
gument : 

Dr. Roslow stated that audience 
measurement method- based onl) on 
homes with telephone- tend to under- 
estimate the size of the audience. Dr. 
Roslow made the following points, 
based on special tabulations from the 
October 1050 Pulse report covering 
Metropolitan New York: 

• From 7:00 a.m. to midnight. t\ 
sets-in-use in telephone homes aver- 
aged 23.6 compared to 2b\4 in homes 
without phones, a difference of 20' < . 

• During the daytime hours the dif- 
ference is even more marked. From 
8:00 a.m. to noon, viewing b\ homes 
not owning phones was 38 % higher 
than the le\el among homes with tele- 
phones. From noon to 5:00 p.m. the 
difference rose to 51%. 

• The non-phone families account 
for 19 f < of all families in the area and 
represent 24.4' < of all viewing be- 
tween 8:00 a.m. and noon and 20.2', 
from noon to 5:00 p.m. 



The Bureau of Broadcast Meas- 
urement now has 130 radio station- 
in Canada lout of a possible 101 i. 26 
tv stations tout of 2!! i and five t\ -ta- 
tions in the I nited State- signed up 
for the new HHM time period audience 
survey. This puts subscribers at 80% 
of private radio stations and 939? °f 
private tv stations in Canada. ^ 




Our KRIZ Phoenix special — they're 
guaranteed to do the work of trans- 
istors!" 



60 



SPONSOR 



5 .1 \M VR1 1''5, 



thnl 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



5 JANUARY 

Copyright I9J7 look for reportn lxiliim Oil tv to i IIHI^r flOIII tin-. ( < ) III 11 1 1 1 ! • > ' i- Cull- 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. ... . 

£rr-"> gets rolling in the iu\t few weeks! 

1) The Bouse JikI i< in \ antitrust subcommittee, headed ! •■•■ I' 
The report will ihal with I rum'- it held <.n network 

how these practices square with the monopoly ind anti-trust I 
suggesl man) changes in these laws as the] llh-c i tb 

2) The Senate Commerce Committer 

It will l>r a cover-the-waterfront type of report, including «nd 

practices "I nlif and fee-tt , 

3) House Small Business Committee. R will 
comment on how various •■ ulatory agencies perform th»-ir functions, will • :>ect* 
paid t'> the FCC — and FTC. 



Hi proceedings maj speed up in teveral important directions with the re- 
turn of Congress. 

The Commission will u i-h to ward off C 
much as possible. 

Deintermizture proceedings involving 11 markets hs 
Commission must dictate entry into a new ph.i- 

The writing of arguments and counter-argunients is over and • • «an 

either come to decisions in the various order full' 1 

As a practical matter, the Commission will order foil bearings, 

in those market- where vhf stations an- 00 the ail or where vhf pennil ted. 

The FCC has heen overruled by me courts b 
bypassed for quick decisions, and the courts have directed such !■■ 

While final decisions about deintermixture in the 
court-dictated redtape. look for quick designation of I thai the FCC wi 

in a position to tell I » it is moving as fas! .1- the courts •rill allow. 

The question of conversion of all or major pari of rt to t 1 "- ah! I 
center and will not be unstuck b) Congressional thre 

FCC chairman George McConnaughe - "crash program* 1 - 1 in 

Ipril, L956, with the hope of putting uhf on solid bat 
of the window. 

All segments of the industrj have meanwhile combined in s leleviakni \ll....n 
Study Organization and t! 

expected for -<>me time. 

The FCC has also meantime started work 
erressional heat. 

The Stud) Organization rASO -has air- ■. : bodgeted 150,000 foe the adnafaals- 

trative portion of it- Bret year of operation, effective th 

The expenses will be -h^^ equal!) by all I awpcamg TAS 

Dr. George R. Town is the executive dii 

SPONSOR • D JANUARY 19d i 



TRIANGLE STATIONS 





Delivering 

T O 

Audiences 



EXCLUSIVE 

ONLY TRIANGLE STATIONS deliver ALL of 
the top film product available to television, 
reaching ONE out of every TEN TV homes in 
America . . . 15,000,000 people in Connecticut, 
Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, 
New York, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. 



WFIL-TV . . Basic ABC • WNBF-TV . . Basic CBS + ABC, NBC 
WFBG-TV . . Basic CBS + ABC, NBC • WNHC-TV . . Basic ABC + CBS 
Blair-TV for WFIL-TV, WNBF-TV and WFBG-TV • Katz for WNHC-TV 






WORLD'S 
BEST 

MOVI 




arner Bros • MGM • 20th Century-Fox * RKO 



I.LWSION'S HOTTEST BUY! $3^ billion worth 
i he BEST entertainment on TV anywhere. . . topping 
I- competition in market after market. Prime time 
liabilities going fast! Phono or wire today! 




WFIL-TV 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

WNBF-TV 

BINGHAMTON, NSW YORK 

WFBG-TV 

ALTOONA, PENNSYLVANIA 

WNHC-TV 

NEW HAVEN-HARTFORD. CONN. 



operated by: Radio and Television Olv. / Triangle Publications, Inc. / ASth A Market Sts.. Philadelphia 39. Pa. 
WPIL-AM e FM eTV, Philadelphia. Pa./WNBF-AM »M«TV, Binghamton. N.Y. 
WHGB-AM, Harrlsburg, Pa. / WFBG-AM • TV. Altoona, Pa. / WNHC-AM • FM • TV. New Haven-Hartford. Conn. 
National Sales Office, 465 Lexington Avenue, New York 17, New YorK 



A roundup of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



5 JANUARY 

Copyright 1957 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INO. 



Just because a big manufacturer prefers certain kinds of shows, don't automatically 
think that his dealers' and distributors' tastes are the same. Often they aren't. 

A major agency has polled the distributors of a leading appliance account on the sort of 
fare they prefer to sponsor locally. Here is what they said: 

• They want a show whose leading personality can be built into a local celebrity. 

• They want something people will talk about — mainly to them. 

• They want to be "in on" the show at auditions or screenings (apparently because 
the station management lionizes them at such doings). 



Here's a sure sign of radio's resurgence: The time broker has come alive 
again. 

He's the fellow who buys an hour across the board at a bulk price and re-sells it with 
a merchandising gimmick to an assorted flock of local advertisers. 

One of the most active of the current crop operates out of an office in Brooklyn. 

The deal is for either 13 or 26 weeks, depending on how many buyers he can round up 
and station competition. 



Does the spoofing commercial actually sell anything besides humor? 

Piel's Beer says it has proof positive that it does. 

As underwriter of the famed Bert and Harry commercials, Piel's says its sales in New 
York State were up 21% last year — with the biggest December in history. 
The over-all consumption of suds in the state, by contrast, fell 14%. 



For all the grumbling that the communications business will send you to your grave 
before you're 50, enough fathers inspired their sons to follow in their footsteps to 
make an impressive roster. Here's a piece of it : 



64 



FATHER 


ASSOCIATION 


SON 


ASSOCIATION 


James P. Aubrey 


Aubrey, F, M & H 


James P., Jr. 


ABC-TV programing 


Harry M. Bitner 


Consolidated R & T 


Harry M., Jr. 


WFBM-TV, Indianapolis 


Ken Boice 


CBS & WQXR 


Hugh 


WEMP, Milwaukee 


Robert Colwell 


JWT 


Howard 


BBDO 


A. H. Hobler 


Benton & Bowles 


Edward 


NL&B 


A. H. Hobler 


Benton & Bowles 


Wells 


Gardner 


R. L. Hurst 


BBDO, Chicago 


G. E. (Buck) 


CBS Radio 


C. J. LaRoche 


C. J. LaRoche 


Chester R. 


LaRoche 


WU1 Lockridge 


JWT 


Ben 


CBS Radio 


C. Bruce McConnell 


WISH-TV, Indianapolis 


Robert B. 


WISH-TV 


John U. Reber 


JWT 


John H. 


NBC Spot Sales 


David Sarnoff 


RCA-NBC 


Robert W. 


NBC president 


99 99 


55 55 


Thomas W. 


NBC Pacific Div. 


Edward P. Shurick 


KSTP, St. Paul 


Edward P., Jr. 


CBS-TV Station Relations 


Frank Smith 


Benton & Bowles 


Frank, Jr. 


CBS-TV Sales 


George B. Storer 


Storer Stations 


George B., Jr. 


Storer Stations 


99 M 99 


55 55 


Peter 


55 55 


99 99 99 


55 55 


James P. 


55 55 


John Orr Young 


Consultant 


Raymond 


SSCB 






SPONSOR • 5 JANUARY 1957 



NBC RADIO 

i Continued from \ 

The) argue thai the 7.5' i network 
revenue in< reaae promised b) >s > B( 
will be i 1 1 — i .1 drop in the buclcel bj 
compai ison with revenue lost. I m thei 
more, the 7.")', increase, sa) the reps, 
amounts to little as ii is, since it's 
figured ii"i "" the network's gross in- 
come from the time Bale atl i ibuted t" 
■ | articulai station, bul 7. >' I oi the 
revenue i«» thai station, which isn t 
much a» ii is. 

I lii- i- \ l>< 's position : "If \ i>u 
take .i short-range vie* on this, an 
individual station ma) lose al first \<\ 
not taking advantage of the othei 
time sales we've made possible for it, 
says Culligan. "However, we're actu- 
all) letting the stations sell lot all) 
participations in our network shows 
that we haven't sold on a network 
basis. Here's how our 'no-waste' policx 
works: Each station break in network 
time becomes Tit seconds adjacent to 
shows. Hence station- gel an extra 
minute to Bell locally. Secondly, we 
have given stations the right to sell 
participations locally, with recapture 
rights, ot course." 

Reps point to non-affiliates 

Man) reps arc less than enthusiasts 
about ilii- bonus. "We have man) 
stations thai aren'l NBC affiliates, 
several pointed out. "\\ hal interest 
do we have in selling against our- 
selves, l>\ pushing participations in 
NBC Radio shows, when we might 
have a non-NBC station in some ol 
our important markets? 
• Idvertiser reaction Fear of inade- 
quate clearances was a restraining fac- 
tor which prevented some tobacco ad- 
vertisers and a drug client from buy- 
ing the package. 

"It NBC can deliver, then"- no 
question thai the $2.1 million price 
for 52-week sponsorship per advertiser 
make- this an attractive package," the 
account supervisor for a major tobac- 
co account told sponsor. 

I he two sponsors who have boughl 
the news package, Bristol-Myers and 
Brown & Williamson, have the follow- 
ing arrangement: 

On one da\ Bristol-Myers will kick 
off as major advertiser on the 7:00 



confidentially 



WE SPEND A LOT OF TIME 



WITH MILWAUKEE HOUSEWIVES 



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KCBQ S«n Diego • KRUX '• 
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SPONSOR 



5 JANUARY 195' 







Biggest Twin Cities traffic 
jams are in store aisles — 
downtown, uptown, wherever 
WLOL's Big 5 disc jockeys 
say "GO!" Local businessmen 
know that. That's why they 
buy WLOL in preference to 
any other station. 

The local businessman will tell 
you, too, that WLOL delivered 
crowds reach first for 
WLOL sold brands. 

It's a merchandising fact 
that will work for you! Let 
B-5 selling impact send the 
aisle jammers your way. 





MINNEAPOLIS • ST. PAUL 

1330 on the dial 5000 watts 

LARRY BENTSON, President 

Wayne "Red" Williams, Mgr., Joe Floyd, V. P. 

Represented by AM Radio Sales 



a.m. newscast, alternating with Brown 
X \\ illiamson each hour. The next day 
!the tobacco advertiser starts with the 
minute commercial at 7:00 a.m. And 
there'll be cross-plugs, of course. 

Both sponsors state that they did 
mot use spot radio money to go into 
/this plan. Bristol-Myers, says Don 
■ Frost, the drug firm's advertising di- 
rector, actually made a separate radio 
appropriation to go into the NBC 
package. Archibold Foster, Ted Bates 
account supervisor on Brown & Wil- 
liamson, sa\s that the tobacco firm 
won't cut back its spot radio cam- 
paigns either. 

. "We've been heavy in network ra- 
dio for quite a while, with some 13 
inetwork participations a week for 
i,\ Lceroys and Kools. We may cut back 
'our other network radio spending to 
provide money for this buy. We've 
got at least four XBC Radio partici- 
pations weekly." 

j Here's how the NBC "news pack- 
age" fits into the over-all strategy of 
[these two advertisers: 

Bristol-Myers — "News has great in- 
terest at the present time," says Don 
Frost. "We feel that this type of pro- 
graming will provide good audience 
penetration." 

The drug client also felt that this 
NBC buy gave an opportunity for 
broad national coverage at high fre- 
quency. 

Bristol-Myers plans to start off its 
first 13-week cycle with Bufferin. and 
will rotate other products in the com- 
mercial time as the year progresses. 

Broun & Williamson — For years, 
this firm's expenditure has been very 
heaw in t\. not print. Radio had been 
B&W's traditional wa" of reaching 
non-tv homes. 



Massive attack on market 

"Non-tv homes can't be isolated geo- 
graphically,"" says Archibold Foster. 
"However, we did compute the cost- 
per-1,000 on radio-only homes, which 
led us to nighttime network radio. YA e 
max be one of the largest buyers of it 
today. Now, we feel that we need a 
more massive attack on the total mar- 
ket by a medium. We're no longer 
using radio as a supplement of t\ 
coverage. Instead, now we're think- 
ing of radio as a national medium to 
talk to everybody. The appeal of this 






THERE'S ONLY ONE LEADER... 

K23LMV4 MONTANA 

THE CONTINENTAL DIVIDE STATION. BUTTE 



BMI 



Stories 

from the 

Sports Reeord 

Winter Continuities 

Music and sports team up 
in this series devoted to eye- 
witness accounts of dramatic 
action on the winter sports 
scene. 

This continuity package 

.„;„ 12 fifteen minute 
contain* i^ lllurl 

programs featuring the sports 
of the winter season ... the 
Olympics, football, hoxing, 
along with some of the great 
anecdotes of the world of 
sports. 

Your Station Program Department 
should be receiving this script package 
regularly. If not, please wr.te to 
BMI's Station Service Department tor 
•Stories from the Sports Record. 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 



NEW YORK 



HOLLYWOOD 



MONTREAL 



66 



SPONSOR 



5 JANUARY 1957 



pa< kagf i- ili»' spread I n com 

mercials and the frequenc) >ti an .11 
1 1 .11 i i\ i- cost. 

Neithei advertise) fell read) to 
mit himseli as t" the eventual outlook 
mi il*«- l>u\ . < Ileal ances %>. 1 1 1 be i de- 
cisive fa< i"t . I>"ili said. 
• Long-range inn Ovei tin- pasl fivi 
years, network radio time periods have 
luall) been diminishing in v.iln. 
through i\ competition. \t the Bame 
lime, station-option time like earl) 
morning, late afternoon and late nighl 
has been gaining in value, I he \ Bl 
"news plan," sa) the reps, maj be jusl 
the first concrete plan aimed .it .1 re- 
shuffle of the strong programing peri 
ods. I In- network is moving into thos< 
station periods thai are in<>-i valuable. 

\\ here will tlii> trend end? 

Additional "hot line" programing 

M>( !'s "het-line" sei v ice i- alread) 
being considered b) the network as .1 
possible -nunc of additional program- 
ing. F01 instance, sports might be the 
next logical step. There's audience 
potential f<>r the last five-minute broad- 
cast of an) championship basketball 
game 01 major sports event. 

Whatever happens, it seems sure 
thai Ml* - innovations are not the 
las! -1 ••(> in the evolution <>f network 
radio. Hie medium has faced prob- 
lems as difficult a> an) to ever beset an 
industry. The) are problems which 
are probahl) more complex because <>t 
the involved relationships than anj 
other business has evei had to solve. 

Commented one veteran timebuying 
executive and observer >>f the broad- 
i .i-t -i ene: 

"Network radio provide- ,i useful 
and in some re-peet- essential service 
to the public and to stations. Yd the 
stations are subsidizing the existence 

of the network- because tliev make so 
little from network time -ale- .1- com- 
pared to what the) can get from theit 
own local or national -pot -ale-. \\ hat 
1- the answer? Eventuall) it has t<> 
come down to programing. If the net- 
work- can again provide programing 
which has so much audience appeal 
that the stations profit from carrying 
it. then the network- and stations will 
live together on a happ) basis. 

w e re watching the changes al 
NBC from the point of view of the au- 
dience the) help deliver. That- the 
keystone." •#*> 



Advertisers timing lu establish a 
Strong now product personality are 



SOLD 



as a basic 
advertising 

mudlum 




HENRY J. MUESSEN, President and Chairman of the Board 

of Piel Bros., puts it this way: "There's no doubt that Be 

Harry sold themselves. However, without Spot's fie- 

great cumulative audiences, they never would have made the 

grade so fast They are established 

salesmen and stars in their own 

right, thanks to Y4R and Spot 

Radio and Television.'' 



frNBCJ 



The 



moves to the 



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MARCH 1821 • NEW YORK CITY 



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annual IRK Radio Engineering Show ■' >mcna! <ia\t thr lartcnt thou ■ 

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nation '- largest, industry Plan now to he it this vit.iiu i:n|«runi m i 

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SPONSOR 



5 JANIZARY 1957 




there's 
something 
special 
about . . . 




/ 



Kansas City, Missouri 

Lowest cost per thousand* 

1380 Kilocycles — 1,000 Watts 

Represented by Weed & Company 

KUDL 



•Hooper 



it's a 

TELE-BROADCASTERS 

station 



TELE-BROADCASTERS, Inc. 

41 East 42nd Street 
New York 17, N. Y. 
MUrray Hill 7-8436 

H. Scott Killgore, President 

Owners and Operators of 
KUDL, Kansas City, Missouri 
WPOP, Hartford, Conn. 
WKXL, Concord, New Hampshire 
WKXV, Knoxville, Tennessee 



68 





Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 



H ^ Henry O. Pattison, Jr., senior v.p. of 
• Benton & Bowles. Inc., has been appointed 
] vice chairman of its board of directors 
| J according to B&B president, Robert Lusk. 
it Pattison presently heads the creative arm 
I of the agency and is a member of the Plans 
Board. His sphere of responsibility in- 
-j' ( eludes radio-tv commercials along with art 
'^| ^and copy for print media. His background 
in this field spans about two decades. Pattison joined B&B in Novem- 
ber 1942 as a member of the copy department. Prior to that, he was 
10 years with JWT where he started as copywriter and left as copy 
group head. Five years after coming to B&B, he was named copy chief, 
and then in August 1952 was made senior v.p. Pattison is a graduate 
of Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is active in the 
4A's and its Committee on Improvement of Advertising Content. 

Jack Timmons, vice president of Shreve- 
port's KWKH who was recently elected 
president of National Association of Tv 
and Radio Farm Directors has just handed 
out some solid advice to advertisers regard- 
ing the purchase of farm radio or television. 
Timmons' advice: 111 Study your market 
needs, then buy your farm programs station- 
by-station rather than buying just any so- 
called farm program; (2) buy a station which employs a full-fledged 
farm director (such a director generally is a member in good stand- 
ing of NATRFD ) : (3) check the record to see that your farm direc- 
tor knows agriculture and his audience. Timmons plans a busy year 
for NATRFD. The organization's Sales Promotion Committee, 
headed by Mai Hansen of WOW. Omaha, is at work on the de\el- 
opment of a visual sales presentation of farm broadcast media. 

Peter B. Kenney, 35-year-old general man- 
ager of WKNB and WKNB-TV. West Hart- 
ford. Conn., will continue in that same 
capacitv now that NBC has acquired the 
station as its second uhf outlet. The New 
Britain Broadcasting Co., licensee, will op- 
erate as a wholly-owned subsidiary of NBC. 
Kenney has been a member of the board 
of directors of this company since 1948 
and its executive v.p. since 1954. He came to the commercial depart- 
ment of WKNB when the station went on the air in 1946. This was 
after four years with the Anm Signal Corps where his service in- 
cluded organization of radio and land-line signal centers in France 
and Belgium. In 1949. Kenney became station manager and when 
tv was added in 1953 became general manager of both operations. 
A pioneer in uhf. Kenney has taken part in FCC rulemaking. 







~ '- 


^- 




virv 






j/^^rtZi 






SPONSOR 



5 JANUARY 1957 



Channel 2 



runs rings around... 

the Ulul of /ffdlka^Z/mey! 





\^$ ^r 




... and nearly a million people 
live within that "B" ring! 



Vep-Bigger'n Baltimore I 



I 



2 

100.003 







sponsor • 5 jam un L95' 







STACKS OF 




Smokestacks have always been 
a symbol of activity in our Ohio 
River Valley. They came to us 
first aboard the picturesque 
sternwheelers that opened this 
region to phenomenal growth. 
They stayed to multiply and mul- 
tiply above busy mills and fac- 
tories whose industrial worth to- 
day — in the Huntington- 
Charleston heart alone — ex- 
ceeds one billion dollars! 
Nowhere in America is there 
such a panorama of business un- 
der full steam as in the 100-plus 
counties served by the four-state 
span of WSAZ-TV. Here live 
nearly a million families with an- 
nual buying power close to four 
billion dollars — a symbol of 
booming productivity making 
this America's 23rd TV market. 
Your advertising cuts a smart 
bow wave when you consign it 
to WSAZ-TV, only TV station 
covering the whole area Any 
Katz office can write the ticket. 




HUNTINGTON-CHARLESTON, W. VA 



Affiliated with Radio Stations 

WSAZ, Huntington & WGKV, Charleston 

LAWRENCE H. ROGERS, PRESIDENT 

Represented by The Katz Agency 



Reps at work 




Ted Oberfelder, president, Burke-Stuart Co., New York, believes 
that the niusic-and-news format in radio produces maximum results 
for the timebuyer. '"Radio catches the housewife while she is cook- 
ing, washing, feeding the baby, or driving to the market," Ted says. 
"And, the disk jockey is a pleasant friend who talks to her while 
she works, but never demands her 
time and concentration as is nec- 
essary with soap opera, mystery 
and comedy." Because the house- 
wife identifies herself with the disk 
jockey, Ted points out. many sta- 
tions program all-morning or all- 
afternoon shows which feature one 
personality. The result is that the 
audience grows and grows almost 
geometrically with each hour seg- 
ment; the show keeps its old audi- 
ence and at the same time recruits 
new listeners. Ted also thinks that the musical variety format, with 
all types of music, is a solid entertainment value. "It attracts every- 
one," Ted says, ''rather than limiting its audience to a specific 
group." The final ingredient of the formula — news — makes the per- 
fect balance. "The news," Ted thinks, "familiarizes the housewife 
with enough of what's going on to interest her and vet not bore her." 



Chuck Standard, Robert Meeker. New ^ ork, thinks these steps 
should be taken to accelerate and facilitate timebuying: (1) Buyer- 
salesman appointments. "Because the salesman will not have to sit 
in the agencv waiting room for a half-hour, he will be able to con- 
tact more buvers and offer better service; because the timebuyer s 

schedule will not be interrupted 
by unexpected calls by salesmen, 
he will work more efficiently." i 2 I 
Mornings allocated for buyer- 
salesmen appointments; afternoons 
for evaluating the availabilities. 
"The buver can then place the or- 
der the same day. rather than da\s 
later, when many of the availabili- 
ties might be gone," Chuck sa\s. 
1 3 1 Seeing salesmen b\ terri- 
tories: for example, reps for 
southern stations on Mondays. 
reps for northern stations on Tuesdays. "This way, the timebuyer 
can systematical!) compare availabilities," Chuck points out. In 
cooperation with this, station representatives could limit their 
presentations to 5-10 minutes. '"Because most buyers know the 
stations and market ~ ;i- well as we do," Chuck says, "it's only neces- 
sary to cover the salient points and report the latest developments." 










SPONSOR 



5 JANT \RY 1957 




WCAU means 



PH I LADELPH I A 



response 



This Btory k directed particularly to those 
who .ok. "How much product did it n 

WCAU-TVs "Mister & M rod 

( tone Crane, in a few weeks ini the 

upholstering department's work al Gimbeb about 
200 jx>r rent! Proof that this outstanding couple 
converts audiem -• appeal ti 
So when you think of think of WCAl 

WCAU, WCAU-TV idciphia Bu 

Radio and TV statin- - Phiiadeiph. 

popular stations. uladelph 

Represented national. S 4 Sales. 



sponsor • 5 .i \m \ky 1957 






SPONSOR 



Tv and the agency mergers 

Television, which has had dynamic impact on every facet 
ol business, is now having an important died on the small 
.Hid medium-sized advertising agency. It is apparently one 
of the important stimulants to advertising agency mergers 
which have occurred at an increasing rate over the past year. 

Recognizing the need for television and other agency spe- 
cialists which their hillings could not justify, a number of 
agencies around the country have entered into mergers with 
larger shops in New York and elsewhere who could provide 
this pool of talent. 

The healthy thing in these agency mergers is that the iden- 
tity and individuality of the smaller shop is usually main- 
tained. This we regard as a good omen for advertising. 
While the tendency in business generally is for smaller com- 
panies to submerge their identity following a merger, agen- 
cies are finding a way to combine the virtues of bigness with 
the unique advantages of the smaller operation. 

We think clients will benefit from this system if it works 
as planned. The smaller shop's clients will gain access to 
expanded services in the field of marketing as well as tele- 
vision. The larger shop's clients will benefit in terms of 
having an agency with more offices around the nation. 

As agencies become more deeply concerned with provid- 
ing marketing aid and guidance, they will inevitably find the 
need for regional offices increasing. This, along with the 
smaller agency's need for specialists, is bound to increase 
the urge to merge. 

We hope this point is borne in mind as the mergers con- 
tinue. The smaller agency may enter into a merger to ac- 
quire tv services and representation in the New York and 
Hollywood tv centers. But it has much to contribute as well 
to the television knowhow of the merged agencies. Fre- 
quently smaller agencies do a wonderfully creative job, sub- 
stituting wits and basic sales skill for cash. It will be highly 
beneficial if some of this local-level wisdom finds its way 
into television's bloodstream. 



THIS WE FIGHT FOR There's a big job to 

be done in training new timebuyers who've 
been entering the field in droves. Radio's fun- 
damentals, particularly, are overlooked. We 
suggest agencies review their training programs. 










lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Be prepared: Grey Advertising's em- 
ployee insurance has extended medi- 
cal coverage that includes psychiatric 
treatment. ". . . and then, Doctor, I 
dreamed the client rode into the agen- 
cy in a chariot draun by six spotted 
timebuyers ..." 

Grist: Author Don Mankiewicz esti- 
mates that in the past 10 years tv has 
used up 5,000 years of literature. We 
must have missed Decameron Tales. 

Release from KRON-TV (San Fran- 
cisco i : '"Remember that boa con- 
-i i ii tor that was 'snakenapped" from 
the Steinhart Aquarium? Before that 
he had another unusual experience, for 
a snake. He appeared with KRON -T\ 
Art Director Bill Wagner on a closed 
circuit color demonstration so the 
California Academy of Sciences could 
see how a reptile looks when color- 
cast." While we don't knou- what a 
snake considers an "unusual experi- 
ence" ive do agree this boa has lived. 

Naturals: Since this department be- 
gan running "Station buys we'd like 
to see," more suggestions have been 
coming in from readers: Hershej 
Chocolate on KOKO i \\ arrensburg. 
Mo. i: Carnation Milk on WEAN 
(Providence, R.I.i: Hazel Bishop No- 
Smear Lipstick on KISS I San Anto- 
nio. Tex. I : Thorn McAn's Shoes on 
\\ VLK (Patchogue, \. Y.i : Geritol 
on WELL I Battle (reck. Mich. I : \\ ise 
Potato Chips on WISE (Asheville, 
N. C.i. 

Wide, wide screen: Hugo Gerns- 
back, editor of Radio-Electronics, pre- 
dicts "sk\ television" — a satellite mir- 
ror 60 miles across revolving around 
the earth. A satellite tv-projector unit 
would revolve along, throwing adver- 
tising messages on the mirror with 
letters 25 to 35 miles high. W ell. that 
ought to get the out-of-home viewers. 



Got a spot? 

This column welcomes contributions 
from readers. Subjects should l>e con- 
fined to broadcast advertising, m;i\ 

include news items, typos, on-the-air 
Buffs, u.nk\ ads, agencj or rep firm 
triviae. Those selected for publica- 
tion will be credited to the sender-. 
Vddress: '"lO-Seeond Spot-."* si'onsok. 
40 E. 49th St., New York 17. N. Y. 



72 



SPONSOR 



5 jam vkv 195*3 



rs 







it<| 

couHI 
:olorl 
id . 





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v. \ 







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JUBHUIIUI II 

nothing else like it on TV 




this flying machine can do anything 













brand new, first run scries—.')!) films 

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the nations biggest market 






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a telephone call will do 

I AVAILABILITY 



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in New York 
mtt 9_^nn 



elsewhere 

Pofovc H-riffin WrwKvsrrl Tnf. 




Serving the TWIN CITIES 
of the South 



Plus 150 other 
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* Source: SRDS Consumer Market Data 

WW I vv I ^gy 

TAMPA • ST. PETERSBURG 




Owned and Operated by 
THE WKY TELEVISION SYSTEM, INC. 
WKY-TV and WKY Radio, Oklahoma City 
WSFA-TV, Montgomery, Ala. WTVT, Tampa, Fla. 
Repreienfed by THE KATZ AGENCY 






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IN NEARLY 200,000 HOMES 



TELEVISIONS 
ALTERNATE WEEK 
PROBLEM 

More pi 
>lnn\ control 

i ml hi 

i ml -I. ill- .11 I 

Page 23 



Agency meetings: 
use these tips 
to save time 

Pafc 26 

How to make a 
product look 
its best on tv 

Pa C c 29 



Strategy behind 
Lever $3 million 
net radio buy 

Page 32 



IN WISCONSIN & UPPER MICHIGAN 




(A^WWl 



A 



The Magazine of Wall Street says "In this Valley of the Ohio history is 
being written." Fortune observes, ". . . the Ohio boom is still in its 
infancy." For YOU it means increased sales by using the dominant 
advertising medium in this rapidly-expanding industrial heartland, 
WTRF-TV, Wheeling. 



station worth watching'' 



wtrf tv 



Wheeling 7, West Virginia 



For availabilities and complete 

coverage information — Call 

Hollingbery, Bob Ferguson, 

VP and General Manager, 

or Needham Smith, 

Sales Manager, 

Cedar 2-7777. 




reaching a market that's reaching 




nb;c 



316,000 watts 

Equipped for network color 



new importance! 





2 -V 



what's 1/10 
of 1% 
among 

friends 




W P E 

SECOND 

IN 

PHILADELPHIA 

ONLY ONE TENTH 
OF ONE PERCENT 
FROM THE TOP! 



6 A.M. TO MIDNIGHT— MONDAY THRU SATURDAY 



Pulse Sept.- Oct. 1956 



I 



m 



Represented Nationally by GILL-PERNA INC.— 



SPONSOR • 12 .MM \R\ 1957 



12 January 1957 



Vol. 11, \o. 2 



SPONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 



How to live with your alternate week sponsor 

23 Trend to every-other-week sponsorship presents a problem to sharing 
clients and their agencies. Here is how they view the situation 

Those agency meetings! 

26 Some reps say there are more today than ever. Agencies disagree. In 
any case, here are some hints on shorter and more productive meetings 

How to make produets photogenie 

29 Product "make-up" and other devices have been developed by film pro- 
ducers to make products look as good on tv screens as on the table 

The strategy behind Lever's $3 million net radio buy 

32 Lever, for Breeze, Rinso Blue and Spry, signs with CBS for $3 million 
worth of network daytime radio, four shows with 40 commercials weekly 

Can a diseount house use tv? 

34 White Front, Los Angeles appliance retailer, put 45% of its budget 
into a variety of local tv shows, grosses $9 million in one store 



FEATURES 

44 Agency Profile 
20 49th and Madison 
46 New and Renew 
52 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

5 Newsmaker of the Week 
68 Reps at Work 
42 Sponsor Asks 
16 Sponsor Backstage 



64 Sponsor Hears 

9 Sponsor-Scope 
72 Sponsor Speaks 
48 Spot Buys 
72 Ten Second Spots 

6 Timebuyers at Work 
70 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 
61 Washington Week 



In Next Week's Issue 



How fast ean you buy a spot radio eampaign? 

If a sudden marketing problem arose, how long would it take to have spot 
radio support od the air? What's the Fastest way to place a campaign? 

Monthly cost and programing Comparagraph 

Want the average co^t of all half-hour tv dramas? The cosl of a 
specific show? See next week's special Comparagraph section 



Editor and President 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 
Vice-President-General Manager 
Bernard Piatt 
EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 

Executive Editor 

Miles David 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Senior Editors 

Alfred J. Jaffe 
Evelyn Konrad 
Jane Pinlcerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Assistant Editors 

Joan W. Holland 
Jack Lindrup 
Betty Van Arsdel 

Contributing Editors 

Bob Foreman 
Joe Csida 

Art Director 

Phil Franznick 

Production Editor 

Erwin Ephron 

Photographer 

Lester Cole 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Advertising Director 

Arnold Alport 

New York Manager 

Charles W. Godwin 
Midwest Manager 

Kenneth M. Parker 

Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 

Promotion Manager 

Mort Winthrop 
Production Manager 

Jean L. Engel 
Advertising Staff 

Marilyn Krameisen 
George Becker 
Dianne Ely 

Administrative Coordinator 

Catherine Scott Rose 
Circulation Department 
Beryl Bynoe 
Emily Cutillo 
June Kelly 

Accounting Department 
Laura Oken 
Laura Datre 
Readers' Service 
Betty Rosenfeld 
Secretary to Publisher 
Carol Gardner 

Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, 
Circulation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 
49th St. (49th & Madison) New York 17, 
N. Y. Telephone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. 
Chicago Office: 161 E. Crand Ave. Phone: 
Superior 7-9863. Los Angeles Office: 6087 
Sunset Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4- 
8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., 
Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: United 
States $10 a year. Canada and foreign 
$11. Single copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. 
Address all correspondence to 40 E. 49th 
St., N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. 
Published weekly by SPONSOR Publications 
Inc. Entered as second class matter on 
the 29 January 1948 at the Baltimore 
postoffice under the Act of 3 March 1879. 

Copyright 1957 

Sponsor Publications Inc. 







KTHS 



(LITTLE ROCK) 

Flips Through MAGAZINE, Too! 



KTHS is Basic CBS Radio for Little Rock — but with 
50,000 watts it also serves hundreds of 
smaller towns and cities throughout the 
State. 

Take Magazine (Ark.) for example. With only a few 
hundred souls. Magazine doesn't offer much 
"circulation" by itself. But combined with 
scores of other communities, it helps give 
KTHS interference-free daytime coverage 
of more than 3-1 1 3 million people! 

Ask vour Branham man for the full KTHS Storv. 



si* 



KTHS 



50,000 Watts 
CBS Radio 



iROADCASTING FROM 

ITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS 

Represented by The Branham Co. 

'nder Same Management as KWKH, Shreveport 

Henry Clay, Executive Vice President 
B. G. Robertson, General Manager 




■m KTM9 H»t«« arl«" » • 

hat a rwcUtiM •* l.*M.:s» »»•»■•. 1 •»••» mr 

IW.Wt ate •«• M frwtm tnm 

tay *0*r rtalU a*»! •-> Oar l«>»laiaMaa fr— 

•rrr,,. arr« -m a Mr. arte* ar 3 jrr «i! 



Another FIRST 



COI 





IN THE SEVENTEEi 

Counties WBRE-TV Cover 



Consistent with the leadership which brought the World's 
First Million Watt TV Station to this important section 
of Pennsylvania, WBRE-TV now provides COLOR to its 
320,000 sets in a market of 2,000,000 people. 

Local live and film shows have been added to the growing 
line-up of NBC Color Shows, offering the local, regional and 
national advertiser the opportunity to bring his products 
into the 275,000 TV homes with all the impact of their 
beauty and design. 



National Representative : The Headley-Reed 

Counties Covered: LUZERNE LACKAWANNA LYCOMING COLUk 

SCHULYKILL NORTHUMBERLAND MONROE PIKE WA 

WYOMING SULLIVAN SUSQUEHANNA BRADFORD 

SNYDER MONTOUR CARBON 








the week 




John H. Mitchell: tv film's early bird 

John Mitchell, vice president "I sales i"i Screen (»< - 
in tv film Bales the Bame tough, competitive spirit thai he • 
brought to tin' position of < - n< I on the I niversit) ol Vlicl 
eleven. \t a recent press conference in New \<<ik i ii\ In 
nounced plan- for 1!! new SG pilots .it .1 1 osl • •! -I nillion, tossed 
the t\ film industry several bones to gnaw on, crossed lances with 
\IU 'a Bob Sarnoff on the subject 
< > t feature film .1- network tare. 
The next daj he was "It on .1 Bell" 
junket, delivering presenta- 
tions i" General Mills and the 
Post ' ereals Dh ision "I < General 
i ds. It i- the earliest Mitchell 
has evei been out selling for the 
next season. Screen Gems foresaw 
this year .1- a good time for earl) 
Belling, .iikI Mitchell is finding it 
■ "wide open market for film. 

Of the 1!'> new s) ndicated pilot-. 
nine will be completed b) I February, the rest bj I March. I >- ! 
jrear, SG made nine pilots, sold six. Mitchell's ■ foi 1 1 1 • - 

industry is that out of ever) 100 pilots made, I 11 get on the 
Ol these, about ,5 survive t>> become relativel) long-term shows. 

Although he's out selling it. Mitchell is the first to admit thai 
syndication is over-supplied. In fact, he told the New York 
conference that $25,000 is as much as a studio can risk per show 
on production because of (1) influx of feature filn run 

product that has accumulated from network and syndication, and 
the clearances bottleneck. The produce] of a first-run series is 
competing with the tremendous re-run stockpile, much of which has 
been amortized and can be sold at next t" nothing. Production of 
a 13-show package i- a gamble toda) unless it's ">"'< underwritten. 

Mitchell's views on feature film (SG through < olumbia has 1,200, 
read) t< >r release at the rate of ~>2 t.> l'U per yeai are at vari 
with the opinions of Bob Sarnofi who takes a dim view of movies 
network. Mitchell believes that next season will find one big '* V 
picture (these will come from all studios) per week on each network 
in Class "' \" evening time. Several major advertise rs are now inter- 
ested <mi the grounds thai feature film is (1) a sound, econo 
buy, (2) delivers an audience at a favorable cost-per-1,000 hi 

ma) be an answer to the current network programii - doldrums. 

On the subject of agenc) show control, SG invites no part of it. 
*" \ producer of programs,' 1 Mitchell -a\~. "should have explicit con- 
trol of the entertainment values that -■> into a show. I hi- 1- the 
producer's business. Onl\ when entertainment values cut .1 
business and advertising policies should an agei ■ ) step in." < BS 
exercise* no control over SG film productions of Ployh 

Mitchell came to SG five years ago in his present capacity, now 
head- a sales organization of about 17 men. ^ 






lowest 
cost -per- thousand 




o 

v 



cost per thousand e, 

••.er than 
closet nyjl 



SPONSOR 



12 JANUARY 1957 



IB 

m 



ID 



III 
ui 

J 

o 



delivers 5 1 average 
between 8 and 5 No 
urines below 4 4 
Pulse Sept Oct 56 



Era 



covers what counts' 
800.000 people M half 
millivolt contour 
550.000 of them arc 
in Franklin Count . 
the home count, 



Columbus, Ohio 

ffct sfvfiM win 




at 

BAKERSFIELD 

KBAK-TV 

Now 










Primary Affiliate 




Represented Nationally 
by 

WEED TV 



Timebuyers 
at work 




Dorothy Barnett, Roj S. Durstine, Inc. New York, reports success- 
ful spot radio results for their food accounts through the use of the 
following strategy: (1) Late week daytime radio saturation to reach 
as wide a segment of 'buying-minded' women as possible. '-Our 
research has shown that the average housewife shops toward the end 
of the week, when she usualh 
buys for the entire week. Hardly 
an) buying is done on Monday 
and from Tuesday on it builds 
gradually to its peak on Frida\ 
and Saturday, ll is important to 
impress the woman immediately 
before she shops because the mem- 
ory factor is tricky. The housew ife. 
even with heavy saturation, will 
rarely remember a day-or-more- 
old commercial. And, the cumu- 
lative impact of advertising must 
not be over-rated; each spot should stand by itself in its selling 
psychology and be placed at a time and day of the week when it can 
initiate action. (2) Station merchandising plans. "We screen stations 
very carefully looking for the best service — from program stars 
who make personal appearances for the product, to placing of store 
displays. Merchandising is a part of advertising, not an adjunct." 



James Hackett, Frank B. Sawdon, Inc., New York, timebuyer for 
Robert Hall Clothes, one of the top 20 spenders in tv and radio, 
comments: "We use one-minute spots almost entirely because the 
frequency impact outweighs the intangibles of program identifica- 
tion. Robert Hall sells the 'super market concept' — a store where 

every member of the family can 
buj his clothes quickly and inex- 
pensively. Consequently, while we 
adyertise Saturday and Sunday to 
reach the man of the house with a 
special promotion, most of our 
buying covers each day of the 
week so that we hit a wide seg- 
ment of both men and women. 
Generally, we use radio 7 a.m. to 
7 p.m. to advertise sales and pro- 
motions, and tv from 6 p.m. to 
sign-off to advertise basic mer- 
chandise. We work with Robert Hall's Merchandising Department 
and sales in each store are correlated with advertising. Altogether, 
we buy on about 200 radio and tv stations 52 weeks a year. Thirty 
of these weeks are saturation, geared to fall and spring: the remain- 
ing 22 weeks' spots are bought in important markets only for 
reminder advertising and to hold prime time positions for us." 




SPONSOR 



12 JANUARY 1957 



PIN 
POINT 






I 



POWER 
GETS 
BEST 
RESULTS 







Buy 



Tom Tinsley 

President 

R. C. Embry 
Vice Pres. 



Radio Station W-I-T-H "pin point power" is tailor-made t<> blai 
Baltimore's 15-mile radius at low, low rates with m> 
W-I-T-H reaches 74'. ' of all Baltimore homes everj week deli 
more listeners per dollar than any competitor. That's why we I 
twice as many advertise ny competitor. That's wh> 

to hit the sales "bull's-eye" for you, too. 




C O 



FIDE 



C E 



National Representatives: Select Station Representatives in New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington. 
Forjoe & Co. in Chicago, Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Dallas, Atlanta. 



SPONSOR • 12 JANUARY 1957 



MORE AUDIENCE* than 

ANY STATION IN MILWAUKEE 



THAT'S WHAT 



WNBF-TV, BINGHAMTON, N.Y. 

DELIVERS DAY AND NIGHT 
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK-AT 

LOWER COST PER 1000. 

YOUR BLAIR-TV MAN HAS 



THE EVIDENCE FOR YOU. 




Also more audience than any 
station in Baltimore, Houston, 
Minneapolis-St. Paul and other 
major markets;at lower cost than 
every station in eight of the ten 
major markets. 
Telepulse, December, 1955. 



WNBF-TV 

BINGHAMTON, NEW YORK 

f©} Channel 12 
NBC-TV • ABC-TV 



operated by: Radio and Television Div. / Triangle Publications, Inc. / 4-6th & Market Sts., Philadelphia 39, Pa. 
WFIL-AM«FM«TV, Philadelphia, p a ./WNBF-AM«FM»TV. Binghamton, N. Y. 
WHGB-AM, Harrisburg, Pa. /WFBG-AM • TV, Altoona, Pa. /WNHC-AM • FM t TV, New Haven-Hartford, Conn. 
National Sales Office, 485 Lexington Avenue, New York 17, New York 

3 SPONSOR • 12 JANUARY 1957 



Vrj 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 






12 JANUARY 



The aftermath of tin- rear's mediocre tv programi og i.. I,, i.h when 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC IK \l )I';|I'"m lletumk C. Ill I I I, I - collie Up. \l,, „|. |l 

.1 drastic re\ ision of tei ma, 

To get tin- focus on wh it happenin 

• The agencies ma) uol be entirelj happj with i 
aren't condemning the talent, writers, and pro blindly. 

• Rather, there i- a growing Feeling thai the physical placement oi • • -I 

it goes on. and who i- comp i ng with it i- 

he fixed a- ea-il\ as canning a bunch of actors and musi 
In poking around the Bit i iti ..f the bi 

1) Tin- tv audience i« now pretrj evenlj diatribnted among 1 1 * * - three a c t wo t h a, 

2) Certain programs have thoroughly entrenched themselves n to 
Beason, thus have an automatic edge on uewei competition. 

And the solution that the 

The netuoik- Bhould aker their methods of doing b allowing 

13-week cancellation privileges id of da 

tracts, and (b) make concessions; talent or time contribul 
from an entrenched program produce an into] — t - j >»■ r - 1 

Footnote: The networks did grant such concessions 
'50a when h Bets were limited. 

Predictions among the major N< •>» York agencies are thai next -ea-on pr.uti 

rally all the major tv account anil that includes P&G ami General Foods — wfll 

he loaded with alternate sponsorships. 

Reasons for Bhying away from ■ 

• There's a substantial advantage when the ii»k is spread multiple 

• If a program turn* out to be a clinker, the blow t<> \.>ur pi !ler. 

• Should the time period militate against t 1 p 
Min> on the network from two directions might work out hitter than one, 

Here's the present score for the two multiple*s PAG, 

three exclusive sponsorships, five alternate sponsorshi] • G< neral I oods, I e • 
three alternate. 

iSee The Alternate Week Problem, pagi 

\ li-t of agencies most active in network radio 
am more, bo SPONSOR-SCOPE herewith pres - form, whh i 

of each agency's more important network radi 

Ted Bates: Brown & Williamson, < raft. 

BBDO: Lever Bros,, DeSoto, Curtis Publish: 

Campbell-Ewahl : Chevrolet, United M ! . 

J. Walter Thompson: Schlits, Scott Taper. Ford, Mentholal 

Young & Ruhieam: General Foods, T.ipton. Bristol-M; 
Product*. 

N.\t >tcp in refurbishing radio in the top agencies nurj be an operathmal - 
ration of that medium from \\ . 

This new unit would he in a position I 

• New concepts in programing. 

• Updated techniques in commercial writi 

SPONSOR • 12 JANUARY 1957 



tin: 






SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

• New skills in adapting to radio the ad themes used by the client in tv. 

Some clients already have expressed themselves as feeling this approach is logical. An 
anecdote recently related by Henry Schachte, Lever Bros, ad chief, points this up. 

He sa)s that he had just come from an agency meeting where the product group went 
into great length about proposed storyboards and dialogue; then some one, as a passing 
thought, remarked: "Oh, by the way, we've got some radio commercials, too." 

TvB estimates almost $1,500,000,000 will be spent by tv advertisers in 1957 

for time and programing. 

The estimate breaks down like this: 

Network, $720 million; spot, $389 million; local, $366 million. 

What could brake the trend toward product diversification is the Federal Trade 
Commission's intention to scrutinize a batch of recent mergers. 

Two of these mergers involve network tv advertisers: P&G and Helene Curtis In- 
dustries. 

The FTC wants to look into P&G's take-over of the Charmin Paper Mills and Olin 
Mathieson's buy of the cosmetic line. 

ABC's executive family moves to Miami next week for a series of planning 
sessions. 

There will be three days of discussions with the ABC tv and radio m&o managers; then 
a gathering with the ABC TV affiliates' board of governors to review plans for the 1957-58 
season. 

NBC hopes to broadcast the majority of its shows in color next fall, and expects 
to have conditions and fees spelled out soon. 

So far the network has been absorbing color expenses, especially on agency controlled 
live shows, such as Lux, Goodyear and Kraft. 

NBC also is absorbing the additional expense of color on such film series as Life of 
Riley, Noah's Ark, and Lancelot. 

Advertising media faces this important challenge in 1957: providing local or re- 
gional coverage at the same rate and quality that the big advertiser can get on a na- 
tional basis. 

To Paul R. Freyd, management consultant, that challenge is implicit in many major 
marketing problems. 

Techniques have to be developed to make it possible for small companies to compete 
with big ones in specific geographical areas. Advertising is the uppermost factor here. 

Warns Freyd: Unless marketing men work out solutions of providing conditions under 
which small companies can grow and compete, then the Government will — to the detriment 
of every one. 

Another marketing problem posed by Freyd is this: scientific fractionalizing of the 
national market so that factory investment, labor pools and rates, sales promotion costs, 
sales expense, and transportation costs can be proportioned so as to bring lowest prices to 
the consumer. 

Two prospects for network tv next season are the new Edsel car (Ford) and 
Dow Chemical. 

Agencies for both are now talking to syndicators about films. 
For Dow it will be a return to the nighttime sector. 

10 SPONSOR • 12 JANUARY 1957 



^ SPONSOR-SCOPE Continued 

It'i almost udomaUc to shrug mt u Jloping h progrt .- 

what? Program! are still -..,.,11 compared lo lime i 

Bui is thai reall) true? H - 

As a clue to tl, 
L5 aetwork t\ advertisers in 19 

Time costs are calculated as net to the 
vertuen ■ 

ADVERTISER [TME COSTS PROGRAM COSTS rOTALCOSI 

Procter & Gamble 

General Motors m 

Chrysler Corp. 000,000 10, 

General Foods l_\ 

Colgate 14,1 h, 

Gillette-Toni 00 

1 ..,,1 Iviotoi 

General Electric 

American Tobacco Co. j- . 

1 ever Bros. 00, 

H. J. Reynolds 00,000 

Liggett & Myers 6,0 II. 

Bristol-Myers I 

General Mills 

American Home Produ .00,000 

Although the official figures won't be avail.,: network gross h 

time sales for 1956 probablj will look altout like thia: 

ABC TV, S7."> million: ( US TV, |225 million; NB( l\. |210 mill. 

It lakes more than cost-per-1,000 figures t<> impress some of the big adver* 
Users, John II. Mitchell, Screen Gems sales \.|>.. is finding out 

Mitchell (in a press conl"> I \- tre, Kraft I 

and Studio One as having reached the "'end of the t he predicted their sponsors 

would be turning to feature film- as Bnbatitntea. 

Rejoined a Lever Bros, executive: "The Holly* I stud 

ent to know that in our business there are BUcb I 
and identity with the product or company. We like ral 
stands for a 20-year tradition thing unique." 

From the L. S. Steel camp came thi- retort: 
In tv, as we did in radio, we've tied our identity to a pr< inizatiorj and qu 

of entertainment that are in harmony with our own 

History just can't help repeating itself: 

The board chairman of a network tv advertiser had just retui 
and the first thing he wanted to know v 

"Why did vm- have to sponsor that comedian? Mj wife and I and all our 
friends like Lawrence \\ elk better." 

All of which recalls this incident, which happened u 

The first thing that a new general manager at ( hevrolet did on t.ikin^ a 
was to get Jack Benny fired. W N< d I 

and our friends like Wayne K, 

Louis Dean, now Kudner v.p. and then CampbeH-Ewald 
getting Victor Young to put together an orchestra thai sounded i I 

ABC Radio is taking the rate-raising plunge. 

As of 1 April, prices of the segments on its Mon "100 

down to S50 i for 260 or more segments 

SPONSOR • 12 JANUARY 1957 H 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Procter & Gamble has resumed buying tv spot on a large scale — the first such 
activity since last spring. 

What's significant about the P&G quest for availabilities (which include such products 
as Dreft and Prell) is this: 

The emphasis is on early evening and late night 60-second spots. All of which 
points to a sharp interest — a la Colgate — in feature films. 



Daytime tv's penetration took a notable swing upward last year — not only because 
more people had sets, but also because they used them more. 

Here's an up-to-the-minute analysis of daytime homes-using-tv, based on data furnished 
by Nielsen and processed for SPONSOR-SCOPE by CBS TV Research: 





1955 HOMES 


1956 HOMES 






PERIOD 


PER MINUTE 


PER MINUTE 


% 


INCREASE 


9 a.m. to noon 


4,540,000 


5,106,000 




12.5 


Noon to 3 p.m. 


6,020,000 


7,217,000 




19.9 


3 p.m. to 6 p.m. 


9,150,000 


10,560,000 




15.4 


Ave. Min. 9 to 6 


6,570,000 


7,640,000 




16.3 



Footnote: These comparisons are between December 1955 and December 1956. During 
this interval tv homes increased from 34,400,000 to 38,390.000 — while network rates gen- 
erally remained the same. 

Among the agency-advertiser leaders Pat Weaver has talked to about his plan 
to enter the freelance programing field is McCann-Erickson's president Marion 
Harper, Jr. 

Harper was out of town at press time. Hence there was no opportunity to check the 
report that Mc-E was considering an arrangement whereby Weaver would either serve as 
a consultant, give it first offer on his productions, or both. 



Tom O'Neil's yearend statement on the operation of RKO Teleradio's stations has 
these highlights: 

• Gross time sales for the six tv and seven radio o&o's in 1956 were $5.6 million over '55. 

• The radio stations alone had a 12% increase in time sales. 

• The company's non-network tv stations (WOR-TV, New York, KHJ-TV, Los Angeles, 
and CKLW-TV, Detroit), averaged a billings increase of 23%. All rely heavily on feature 
films for their programing — a significant factor pointed out in the statement. 



ABC TV wants to be early with a wholesale preview of its next season's pro- 
graming. A showing will be held at the Waldorf Astoria 13 April. 

Invitations are going out to about 1,500 advertisers and agencies. 

A similar show will follow in Chicago. 

One of the highlights of these gatherings will be Mike Wallace, who is moving over 
to ABC from WABD. 

For the first time since 1952, you hear admen talking of a "soft market" in 
network tv. 

They point to the fact that 16 network shows are in search of alternate-week spon- 
sors and there has been a series of cancellations. 

To this the networks answer: This is evidence merely of a "soft market" for those 
particular shows. There's still quite a waiting list for prime evening periods. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 5; New 
and Renew, page 46; Spot Buys, page 48; News and Idea Wrap-up, page 52; Washington 
Week, page 61; sponsor Hears, page 64; and Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 70. 



12 



SPONSOR 



12 JANUARY 1957 




Latest 
METRO 



PULSE 



Willi firsl all daj and ai 
Wilis tir-t 360 nut ,.i 360 quar 
ter boors. In and out of home, 
Mon.-Fri., •> a.m. -midnight. 

Latest 
AREA PULSE 

will! ti,-t all day, Willi tir-t 
263 out of 288 quarter-hoars. 



mid pl.ici 



.,, l 



Mnlic Inwi 



Mnii.-S;it., t> a.m.-midnight. 

Latest 

AREA NIELSEN 

Will? tir-t .ill day .in. I night, 
u ith \-.T' , share oi audience. 
W 11 IS first every time period. 
Kffon.-Sat., •> ;i.m.-»> p.m. 

Latest 
HOOPER 

Wins first all day with 12.295 
ol audience. June-Sept., 4- 
month average Mon.-Fri., 7 
a.m. -6 p.m.; s.-it. 8 a.m.-6 pan. 



at WHB 



87<; 



o renewa 



87* , ol \N II B's lai pest billing 
have renewed in 1956 . . . «itli • 
iii> for renewal ! 

\\ III' dominates ■ 
survey. Sure, Storz Station [•rogramn 
tracts tremendous audit ■ • 
vertisi But it takes 
come back for more. And WHB 
station. So much -■>. that WHB 
of renewals for both local and natioi 
other Kansas City rad 

from B WHB I M 

VRMSTROXG 



The Storz Sta 



Today's Radio for Today's Selling 




WHB 

Kansas City, Missouri 



TODD STORZ. 
Presu 



■ 



WDGY 

Minneapolis-St. Paul 



WHB 
Kansas City 



WQAM 

Mia m 



Represented by John Blair & Co. 



KOWH 

Omaha 



WTIX 

New Oriea-s 



Represented by Adam Young Inc. 



SPONSOR 



12 jam ary L957 








!■■""" i 








s »aT*» 






TELEPULSE 




R/ 


mNGS- TOP SP| 




Top 10 shows in 10 or more markets 1 
Period 7-13 November 1956 


7-STATI0N 
MARKETS 


5-STA. 
MARKET 


4-STATION MARKETS 


1 

3-STATH | 


Rank Past* 
now rank 


TITLE, SYNDICATOR. SHOW TYPE 


Average 
ratings 


NY. L.A. 


S Fran. 


Seattle- 
Boston Chicago Detroit Milw. Mnpls. Ptilla. Tacoma Wash. 


Atlanta | 


1 


2 


Death Valley Days (W) 

PACI Fl C BORAX 


20.7 


8.2 

wrca-tv 




13.5 8.9 

wwj-tv wfil-tv 
7:00pm 6:30pm 




2 


1 


Highway Patrol (M) 

Zl V 


19.1 


11.3 10.5 

wrca-tv kttv 
7:00pm 9:00pm 


13.4 

kron-tv 
6:30pm 


15.2 12.2 20.7 11.8 13.5 13.3 24.7 13.2 16.4 

wgn-tv wjbk-tv wtmj-tv kstp-tv wcau-tv komo-tv wtop-tv waga-tv >J 
10:30pm 9:00pm 10:00pm 10:30pm 10:30pm 6:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 7:30pm 1 ■ 


3 


8 


Badge 714 (M) 

NBC FILM 


17.7 


4.2 10.7 

kttv 
! 10pm 7:30pm 


17.7 

kplx 
9:00pm 


15.0 11.2 14.9 10.7 16.5 17.6 11.2 

wnac tv wgn-tv wjbk-tv kstp-tv wcau-tv klng-tv wttg 
8:00pm 7:00pm 10:30pm 7:00pm 6:00pm 7:00pm 


22.9 | 

wsb-tr ifl 
7:00pm '■ 


4 


5 


Dr. Hudson's Secret Journal (D) 

MCA 


17.2 


2.9 10.2 

unix kttv 
1" 00pm : 'in 




164 21.5 12.4 21.2 8.9 5.9 9.2 

wnac tv wnba wxyz-tv wtmj-tv kstp-tv wrcv-tv wmal-tv 

I" :ii|.m 10:00pm 10:30pm 8:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 6:30pm 


17.0 

wsb-tv 
10 :30pm 1 


5 


3 


Man Called X (A) 

Zl V 


17.0 


2.7 5.7 

wpix khj-tv 

x :30pm 7:00pm 


10.2 

krim -tv 
■ 10pm 


17.4 9.3 16.2 12.9 9.7 12.1 8.0 

wbz-tv wgn-tv wjbk-tv wtmj-tv i tv klng-tv wmal-tv 
1 ii 9 30pm 7:00pm 9:30| 7:00pm 8:30pm 9:00pm 


15.9 1 

waga-tv 1 
7:00pm 1 


6 




Sheriff of Cochise (Ml 

NTA 


16.4 


3.1 10.3 

wabd kttv 
: 30pm 7:00pm 


11.2 

kron ii 
6 :30pm 


20.9 16.2 18.4 7.2 14.9 18.0 14.0 

wnbq wwj-tv wtmj-tv weeo-tv king-tv WTC-tv 
6:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 10:30pm 9:30pm 7:00pm 10:30pm 




7 


7 


Science Fiction Theater (SF) 

ZIV 


15.9 


9.7 6.2 

un-;i l\ kttV 

r in - in 


15.0 

kron-tv 

7:00pm 


14.7 16.5 3.9 7.5 8.5 6.3 17.9 6.0 

wbz-ti wnbq wxyz-tv wtmj-tv kmgm-tv wfil-tv king-tv wmal-tv 
6:i5pm 10:30pm 10:30pm 11:00pm S:30pm 10:30pm 10:00pm 6:00pm 


15.5 1 

waea-tr 1 
7 :00pm ■ 


8 




Superman (A) 

FLAM 1 NGO 


15.8 


4.4 9.7 

h abc i v kttv 
(i :00pm 7:00pm 


6.4 

kgo-tv 

6:00pm 


19.4 7.9 16.5 10.5 10.3 18.2 19.0 11.5 

wnac tv wgn-tv wxyz-tv wltl-tv weeo-tv wcau-tv king-tv wrc-tv 
6:30pm 6:00pm 6:00pm 6 inn 1 :30pm 7:00pm 6:00pm 7:00pm 


19.0 1 

wsb-tv ] 
7 :00pm M 


9 


4 


1 Search For Adventure (A) 

BAGNALL 


15.7 


3.1 9.7 

wpix kabc-tv 
7 :30pm 7 :30pm 


21.4 

kiiiv 
7:30pm 


179 89 11.9 7.9 15.2 16.9 

wbkb cklw-tv witl-tv wtci king-tv 
5:30pm 9:30pm 9:00pm 9:30pm 9:30pm 7:00pm 


24.5 

wsb-tv 
7:00pm i 


9 


9 


Stage 7 (D) 

TPA 


15.7 


2.2 9.0 

wabd kttv 
8:00pm 7 30pm 




13.4 18.9 16.0 13.2 

ill./ '. wtmj-tv kstp-tv komo-tv 
• 15pm 7:00pm 9:30pm 8:00pm 


12.2 iJ 

w«b-tv ■ 

10 30pm a*| 


Rank Part* 
now rank 


Top 10 shows in 4 to 9 markets 


1 


2 


Doug. Fairbanks Presents (D) 

ABC Fl LM 


16.8 


15.4 7.3 

wrca-tv krea 
I" 30pm 10:30pm 




4.4 16.9 

wbkb wtmj-tv 
10:00pm 9:30pm 


13.5 

wsb-tv 
7:00pm 1 


2 




Esso Golden Playhouse (D) 

OFFI CI AL FILM 


16.3 






11.9 17.5 4.9 

wbz-tv wcau-tv wrc-tv 
i 1 inn 10:30pm 7:00pm 




3 


4 


Patti Page (Mu) 

OLDSMOBI LE 


16.2 






14.6 4.9 11.3 

wnac ii wwj-tv wtmj n 
7:15pm 11:00pm 10:00pm 




4 


3 


Life of Riley (C) 

NBC Fl LM 


15.8 


9.0 

kttv 
8:30pm 




16.9 11.0 26.2 

wnbq kup tv king-tv 
6:00pm '■ uOpm 7:30pm 




5 




Dateline Europe (A) 

OFFI CI AL FILM 


13.8 






5.7 

wcau-tv 
3:00pm 


6.9 

wlwa 
7 :30pin 




6 




Hopalong Cassidy (W) 

NBC FILM 


12.5 


6.0 

km 
6:30pm 




13.0 

cklw-tv 
7 :00pm 


Si 


7 


10 


Code 3 (M> 

ABC FILM 


12.3 


9.8 

kttv 
9:30pm 


15.5 

kron tv 
10:30pm 


6.5 10.0 9.2 15.1 13.3 

ii \i/ tv wlsn-tv wTcv-tv king-tv wtop-tv 
7:00pm 9:30pm 7:00pm 10:00pm 7:00pm 


-1 


8 




Gene Autry (W) 

CBS FILM 


11.7 


1.8 2.9 

wabd kcop 
v 00pm 8 "H]nii 




10.2 

wlsn-tv 

" 


9 


5 


Ellery Queen (M) 

TPA 


11.4 


3.7 

« 1 1 i x 

0:30pm 




19.4 9.5 

HIM. Ir WJIlk-tT 

Hi 30pm 7:00pm 


10 




Ramar of the Jungle (A) 

TPA 


11.3 


1.8 

.i 1 1 1 \ 
■ Opm 




17.5 105 16.0 

wxyz-tv wtop-tv 
3:0(1 mi 7:00pm 


13.0 1 

u Iwa 

5 nonm | 


10 


7 


Crosscurrent (M) 


11.3 


9.3 

knxt 
in 30pm 




11.5 4.7 

wcoo-tff wmal-tv 
10:00pm 10:30pm 


13.2 

wlwa 
6:00pm , 



Show type «ymbol»: (A) adventure: (C) comedy; (D) drama: (Doe) documentary; (K) kld6: (XD 
mystery; (Mu) musical; (S) sport; (SF) Science Fiction; (W) Western. Films Hated are syn- 
dicated. % nx.. '.« hr. & hr. length, telecast In four or more markets. T*ne average rating Is 
as unweighted average of Individual market ratings listed above. Blank space Indicate* film 



not broadcast in Oils market 7 13 November While network slums are fairly ; 
month to another In the markets In which they are shown, this is true to much let 
syndicated shows. Ttils should be borne In mind when analyzing rating trends fra 
anothe" m this charl Refers to last month's chart If blank, slum was not rate 






I.IVI SHOWS 

















MARKlIs 
Mumbut si L 




2STATI0N MAHKI TS 




Birm Charlotte 




. 




260 


27.9 


23 3 


53.0 


9.8 


29 3 


10 3 


307 

»bm l< 


16.9 


17.3 




41.3 


45.0 


21.3 

wj»r It 




22.0 


40 5 30.5 




25.3 




23.8 
•raht 


53.3 

WbtT 




25.8 


20.0 


.95 
1 Hi ■ 
25 
• Mpi 


19.2 
11.2 


33.5 




30.5 


47.5 






39.5 


14.5 

•rlwd 




23.3 




14.9 


22.8 


48.0 
: 00pm 


18.5 


35.5 

I'> OOpm 


16.8 


16.0 

00pm 


11.2 




29.5 

5:30pm 


30.0 


25.3 


21.3 


' 








40.5 

9 :30pm 




10.5 

Ion l» 

— 1 '"''" 


16.5 


20.8 




19.5 


38.8 

10:00pm 


13.3 








54.5 

«Mt 






5 5 










42.0 






40.0 

uhtT 






24.4 

1 


18.3 

wjar-tt 





22.3 

WbtT 

5:00pm 


j| 16.2 

in oOpm 


15 5 

wbrc-tr 
10 30pm 




34.3 

wtaio 

'pm 




12 3 

irlwtj 

11 :15pm 


'9.2 

■ 


14.3 

ksd tv 




17 Ml '7.7 

T 





¥>:hn stun top 10. Classification is to number of sUUons In 

»«jb own. Pulse determines number by measuring which ttatlem) 

I Hired by homei In the metropolitan area of 1 (rtTeo market 

- itself may be outside metropolitan area of the market- 



MEMO: 



TIMEBUYERS! 



the "THIRD FORCE" 

is FIRST in Northeastern Pennsylvania! 

ARB pro* s WILK-TV your Beit Buy for PRIME TIMf 
:mporfant Northi adi rn f. nnn Uania Til. vision M 

WILK-TV hat more first place quarter hours Sunday 
through Saturday, from 5 P.M. fo 11 P M than any or 
the other Network Stations in th. or. a H ' ts 



WILK-TV 

STATION "B" 
STATION "C" 
STATION "D" 



FIRST PLACE QUARTER HOURS 

66 



57 

46 
3 



Here's the box score on first olace quarter-hours m th, PRIME 
TIME period from 5 P.M. to 1 1 P M . Monday through Fnda. 



WILK-TV 

STATION B 
STATION C 
STATION D 



Monday Tuesday 


Wwdn.sd* 


12 14 


12 7 


6 7 
6 2 



8 12 
4 6 




11 

9 

3 



* POWER 



WILK TV speaks with one and one half million wafts of Pc— 
more thin any other TV station in the world — Here is the Impact 
you need for a complete |ob From Reading to New York S f I 
from Lock Haven to New Jersey The FIRST Station is WILK TV 

For fhj BEST coverage in PRIME TIME— you NEED WILK-TV 
Get the Facts' 



Call 
AVERY-KNODEL, INC. 

• NEW YORK 

• CHICAGO 

• LOS ANGELES 

• SAN FRANCISCO 

• ATLANTA 

• DALLAS 

• DETROIT 




WILKES-BARRE 
SCRANTON 



15 



New 
Nielsen 
No. 2 
PROVES 



CUflL/TiWRBL-TV 





j 61 

| COLUMBUS, GEORGIA ] 



IS 

your 

best 
choice 
for 
1357 

/iV THE BILLION 

DOLLAR 

COLUMBUS, 

GEORGIA 

MARKET 



CALL HOLLINGBERY CO. 



L6 




by Joe Csida 



Sponsor 




Talent trains to sell as well as star 

In this reasonabh new year of 1957 I believe 
advertisers and agencies will see and welcome 
the further development of a fairly fresh talent 
trend. A trend, which finds performers (artists, 
if you will I working just as hard to develop 
their capacities for representing their sponsors 
with dignity and intelligence, as they do devel- 
oping their performing skills. Artists who study 
the art of on-and-off-the-air salesmanship as conscientiously as thej 
do the timing of a punch line or the phrasing of the lyrics of a song. 

It is not. of course, too surprising to find a Dave Garroway or a 
Mike Wallace or a Jack Lescoulie speak well and convincingly of a 
sponsor's product, for talking is indeed their business. It becomes a 
touch more remarkable and commendable when a Steve Allen sells 
merchandise as smoothly and strongly as he does his fine under- 
played comedy. And it develops into an even more interesting 
current day advertising phenomenon when a performer works with 
efficiency and dignitv for a sponsor off the air as well as on. 

Monroe pitches the case for color tv 

Not too long ago at the NBC 30th Anniversary convention in 
Miami Beach, Vaughn Monroe was among those present. I've men- 
tioned Vaughn's work as a super salesman for RCA Victor previ 
ously, but I wasn't really fully aware of how meaningful and con- 
sistent is Vaughns off-air, off-screen work for his sponsor as when I 
saw him in action at and around the Americana Hotel. To affiliate*, 
to hotel brass, to local retailers and local disk jockeys Vaughn was 
RCA's spokesman, or at least one of its most articulate and con- 
vincing spokesmen. I heard him argue the case for color television 
and pitch RCA's phonographs over and over again. And he still 
pursues his career as a record artist and has just started a tv show 
for the air force via the ABC TV network. Vaughn is the type of 
performer I'm talking about. And one of the pioneer performers in 
the business of selling his sponsors product as well as his own songs. 

Another veteran j>erformer, who through the years has worked 
diligently to represent his sponsor's company and product and in 
this tv day does so more than ever, is Edd\ Vrnold, whose record 
sales have just passed the 32.000.000 mark. Eddy has just com- 
pleted a series of specially filmed commercials for the SSS Tonic Co. 
of Atlanta, Ga. SSS Tonic, through the Day. Harris. Hargret and 
\\ einstein. Inc. agenc\ of the same southern cit\ is sponsoring 
Eddy Arnold Time, a half hour tv film series in 53 markets and 
adding new ones all the time. But Eddy doesn't stop at on-the- 
screen commercials. In Ma\ he is scheduled to serve as emcee and 
guest star at a mammoth Bov Scout jamboree in Atlanta, called the 
Scoutorama. In serving in this capacity Eddy is representing SSa 
through its president. Lamar Swift, who is a major factor in the 
Bo) Scout movement in his State. 

But the trend takes on its importance for advertisers from the 






SPONSOR 



12 JANUARY 1951 



KRON TV SF 




Scla<^ ~F^lcl*<uu-.scjt -is SCrtLd <TK. tCRON-T\/ 




AILABLE S. F. CHRONICLE • NBC AFFILIATE • CHANNEL 4 • PETERS. GRI IN. WO 



SPONSOR • 12 JANUARY 1957 



17 



Sponsor backstage continued 




TOP 000 

in Central 
ARKANSAS* 




* PROVED BY SEVEN 

CONSECUTIVE MONTHLY 

HOOPER RATINGS! 



fj latest "PULSE" 

\J report of metropolitan 

LITTLE ROCK 
ranks KVLC FIRST in 

145 out of 200 quarter-hours 
Monday thru Friday 



: sign-on to sign-off 



Cet the KVLC SUCCESS STORY today! 
New York: Richard O'Connell, Inc. 
Dallas: Clarke Brown Company 

Chicago: Radio-TV Rep., Inc. 



KVLC 

LITTLE ROCK 



]8 



fact thai lui^lit new talent is following the course of working to 
develop as star salesmen as well as stars. A young man named Jim 
Lowe has a record on the market of a song called "Green Door," 
which has just passed the 2.0<)().()()() I count "em. two million) mark 
in sales. This is one of the most successful records in the whole 
history of the record husiness. Jim puts in main hours working on 
his songs and record dates, and on t\ shots such as his recent guest 
appearances on the Steve Allen Show, the Walter W inchell show, 
the Will Rogers morning show and numerous others. But Carl 
Ward, Sam Slate and the whole sales force at W'CBS, New York, 
i where Jim does a Monday-through-Saturday, 9:05 to 9:30 a.m.; 
a Monday-through-Friday 11:30 to 11:45 a.m.; and a Saturday after- 
noon, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. show 7 each week) will tell you how hard 
Jim works to deliver his sponsor's message with the greatest possi- 
hle effectiveness. And they'll testify to the unstinting and enthusi- 
astic maimer in which he represents his sponsors at store openings, 
sales meetings, and other such events. It's no accident that Jim 
does this. He is growing up as a performer with the deep convic- 
tion that it's just as much a part of his job to sell his sponsor's 
merchandise as to sing a song in a way to make people want to 
buy his records. 

Sullivan invited her back to do the commercial 

A pretty little gal from Possum Walk Road, N. C, named Bettj 
Johnson currently has a record of a song called "I Dreamed," which 
is well on its way to selling a million records. On Variety's Top 
Record Talent and Tunes list as this is being written the record is 
No. 3 in the country and moving up fast. Betty did her first major 
television guest shot on the Ed Sullivan show just a week ago as 
this is being written. Ed liked her quite a bit. He suggested to 
Jack Babb of Kenvon & Eckhardt that it might be an idea to bring 
Betty back on the show and this time have her do a Mercury com- 
mercial with Ed as well as sing a song. There was something about 
Bett\"s warmth and natural sincerity, which Ed — smart showman 
that he is — quickly sensed. 

And again here I can assure you this was no accident. Bettv has 
been the featured girl singer on Don McNeill's Breakfast Club on 
ABC Radio for o\ er a \ ear, and Don and the BCs advertisers have 
Betty do commercials regularly. And she does them for such ac- 
counts as Admiral, Mum. Realemon Extract and others willingly, 
enthusiasticallv and well. Again, because she is growing up as a 
performer with a full awareness that she must constantly study and 
work to become ever more appealing as a singer, but that she must 
study and work just as hard to do a solid job for the sponsor who 
is paying her salarj . 

I can testif\ to the fact that these two bright new stars believe in 
the idea of striving to hecome star salesmen as well as stars because 
I am rather intimately associated with them as part of the organiza- 
tion which serves as their personal managers. I believe in this ap- 
proach on the part of talent, as 1 have written on a few occasions 
previouslv. and 1 have never had am arguments from Betty or 
Jim. I predict, however, as I said in the beginning of this piece, 
that more and more fine talent will work in the direction of also 
becoming fine salesmen and representatives of the sponsors for 
whom thev work. ^ 



; 



SPONSOR 



12 JANUARY 1957 



m 



F. v. spot editor 

I column $ponsored l>\ one ••! the leading film producen in i«*/«*rui«>n 

s \ u it \ 



NEW YORK: 200 EAST 56TH STREET 
CHICAGO: 16 EAST ONTARIO STREET 










\n old salt, w nil tattooed ai ins .m<l i : 
yam aboui capturing pirates; h spellbinds h i^ 
ever) bo) and mi I in ilt. iv I 

< oated cereal. I he "gimmii » "Jolly 

in cm It |i.ii kage <>\ Prix Fasi p; nt o( tl 

spol sell \i)d i. >! ,i surprise ending, the pa ivers tl 

Produced b) S VRR \ foi (.1 S'ERAL MILLS. IN< I \ I II 

LAIRD, l\( 

SARRA, l \ ( 

New Vork: 200 l an 56th Stn • I 
( lii« ago: 16 I asi < )m.n to mmu 

I he l\ .imlic i .in .i visit to the Bulova Watch i 

second commercial, anothei in the continuii >\RR\ 

\ dramatii documentary approach tells the ston ol fine workmanship 

precision watchmaking. Interesting closeupa ol In 

mainspring, self-winding mechanism* learl) reveal the fin< 

ship that is synonymous with Bulova. Product SARRA r I : • BULOVA 

WATCH ( OMPANY, l\( through M ( \\\ I RH KSON l\< 

SARRA, l\< 

\eu \ mi k: JIMI I asi ".In li Sin . I 
( lii* ago: hi I BSI < )ni .ii m> Sim « t 

I he N.uiic « in h) jingle i<>i s < hoenlii 

styles tremendousl) increases the audio effectivi iln^ m 

seven l\ spots b) SARRA Modern, highly 
humorous cartoon characters combine with the bouncy mus 
i.) emphasize the sponsor's theme, "soonei "i lati 
Schoenling Produced iu<> ways: black on whit< 
black l<>] superimposition on live crowd backgrounds 
Prepared by SARRA foi MM SCHOENLING BREWIM 
ROl I M \\ \M\ I R I ISING \(.l \< i l\< 

SARRA, l N ( 

New York: 200 I as< 56th Street 

( In. ago: 16 I asi < Intai io Street 

Vnothei -spot b) S \RR \ in a continu 

[nsuram I minutes ol convin< i 

head ol th< Vmerican family 

beside a quiel brook, while explain 

Erom Prudential • R tirement Plan. 1 

photograph) and pi 

mercial [or the sponsor's produi 

ducedbySARRA ■ rHE PRUDENT1A1 INSURANCE COMPANY 

Wll RK \ through ( \I KINS i HOI Dl N IN( 

s \ R R \ I \ ( 

\ t M \ . .! k 200 I at 56th Stn 
( tin ago: l<> East Ontario s i" 



SPONSOR • 12 JANUARY 1957 






IN HOUSTON.. 

STATION A 

Sells Ratings 

STATION B 

Sells Merchandising 



STATION C 

Sells Power 

STATION D 

Sells Prestige 

STATION E 

Sells Cut-Rates 



•g,v* 



ALL-AROUND 
BEST 



SELLS YOUR 

CLIENTS' 

PRODUCTS 



MUSIC • NEWS 
SPORTS -MYSTERIES 

Mutual for Houston 
and South Texas 

Call your 
Paul Raymer Man 



IN 
HOUSTON 
SMART TIME- 
BUYERS CHOOSE 

KT HT 

FOR 
RESULTS 




_>i, 



WCDA-B 


Albany 




WAAM 


Baltimore 




VYBEN-TV 


Buffalo 




WJRT 


Flint 




WFMY-TV 


Greensboro 




WTPA 


Harrisburg 




WDAF-TV 


Kansas City 




WHAS-TV 


Louisville 




WTMJ-TV 


Milwaukee 




WMTW 


Mt Washington 




WRVA-TV 


Richmond 




WSYR-TV 


Syracuse 




Harrington, Righter and Parsons, Lie. 
The only exclusive TV national representative 


Neiu York 
Chicago 
San Francisco 
Atlanta 



Ma disc 



Switch to all-media buying 
We waul to extend our thanks o 
SPONSOR for the \ ery fine article which 
appeared in the December 15. 1956 
issue. We think the material was -u- 
perbb presented. And all of us here 
.it Grej are proud to be a part of sue i 
a splendid reportorial job. 

In reading through the article, we 
noticed that the names of two of our 
eight stalwart assistant media buyers 
were inad\ ertentlj omitted. They are: 
John Fit/pat rick, who serves as out- 
door buyer on all Gre) accounts and 
as an assistant all-media buyer, and 
Veronica Welch, who serves as budget 
coordinator on Procter & Gamble and 
also as assistant all-media buver. 

E. L. Deckinger. media 
director, Grey, New York 



Broadcaster's Promotion Association 
I appreciate sponsor reproducing mv 
speech to the Broadcaster's Promotion 
Association. Hut the condensation of 
my effort really turned me into a 
"demanding, ask and you get" guv — 
which as \ou know. I'm not. 

I think the gist of what I said was 
this: 

1. Agencies and clients should help 
the stations promote their programs 
by supplying extra mone\ and pro- 
motion materials. 

2. The stations should activeb mer- 
chandise and promote — not because 
they are expected to. but primarily 
because in helping their clients the) 
help themselves. 

3. Merchandising and promotion 
plans should be custom made to fit 
a client s needs — not a station's port- 
folio. 

Don P. Nathanson. president 
North Advertising, Chicago 

ABC chainbreak promotion 
As an ardent reader of Sponsor-Scope 
I could not resist the temptation to 
write you with reference to an item 
contained on page 11 of the November 
2! issue. This is concerned with the 
item headed "Which tv programs get 
the benefit of free chainbreak plug 
^ mi note ^ \K has discovered that at 



sl'OXSOK 



12 JANUARY 1957 



( 




AGAIN 




The Finest In TV Film Shows From M C A T V 

FILM SYNDICATION 





IF YOU HAD A MILLION 



32.4 national Nielsen average rating for 19 months 
on the CBS Network (as The Millionaire) . . . and just 
made available for local sponsorship ! Features Mar- 
vin Miller. 39 half hours 










MAN BEH 



•les Bickford 



BADGE 



Tht true. The drama-terrific. The ratings-ex 

cellent! A thoroughly reliable sales-builder. 

39 half hours 







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CRUSADER 



Overseas intrigue and suspense in tune with today's 
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MAYOR OF THE TOWN 

The most famous radio dramatic serial continuesl 
fabulous success on television! Huge ready-made ai| 
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39 half hoi 




1 1 Features starring Gene 
irofitable hour strip. 50% adults 

67 hour-long features 



GUY LOMBARDO 

and his Royal Canadians 

"The sweetest music this side of heaven." Smash rat- 
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plus famous guest stars ! 78 half hours 





Mark Stevens portrays crusading editor, Steve Wilson, 
in this series that played the network as "Big Town." 

39 half hours 



Preston Foster 

WATERFRONT 



The all-time all-family dramatic hit that is literally 
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Jnique quarter-hour dramas that harvest big rewards 
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Famous Hollywood Stars 

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An absolute gold mine of star-studded comedy, mys- 
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Nielsen says comedy is your best buy. Here's the out- 
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Western Features starring 

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Strip for action (and bevies of national spot adver- 
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56 hour-long features 





Five years a network rating sensation (Treasury 
Men in Action) -now it can sell for you! Every grip- 
ping story has the approval of the U. S. Treasury 
Department. 39 half houra 



CITY DETECTIVE 



Spellbinding series of metropolitan mystery and 
adventure, starring Rod Cameron. Champion track 
record, solid sales results everywhere ! 65 half hours 




headlines. Alan Hale, Jr. and Randy Stuart play 
the adventurous young couple. A fine all-family 
attraction. 26 half h 




Every show a winner... every sponsorship backed by award-winning 
Advertising, Publicity and Merchandising Campaigns- free! 



No. 1 in the big 1957 parade of new MCA releases for 
local & regional advertisers . . . 

STATE TROOPER 

starring Rod Cameron 



GREATEST ACTION SERIES EVER MADE... 
SOLD IN 80 MARKETS BEFORE RELEASE! 



39 all new half-hour action-packed programs filmed on 
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\i;i .in.) ( BS ill. i. - mi firm answei 
I jusl want I., i. II \<>ii thai at \Bi 
in' have i"i i long lime used I 
five ae< ond 1 1 » - i" greal .i.K u r 
promoting programs and foi un 
■ in tunes ' 'in li\ e se< ond spots .u. 
.ill>>< ated mi .1 urrkl\ basis a* pel .i del 
i it it *- schedule which is issued monthly 
.Hid prepared in tin- department. 

\i id,- moment we are produi ing 
approximately 10 li\<- b« ond 1 1> - .ill 
^ In. Ii . .ii i \ indh iilu.il program 
titles and in some i ases artwork "i 
photographs pertaining t" the particu 
l.ii program 

I thought I would write "I this 
phase ol oui a< 1 1 \ ities in * iew oi the 
that the i olumn -ai<l : "It's 
,,tl- one "t ill""- situations thai 
has escaped exploration because t\ baa 
been t."> busy with bigger things. We 
have always found thai being ahle i" 
offei advertisers .i guaranteed numbei 
of promotion spots eithei on a week!) 
nonthry l>.i-i-. u hethei li\ e set "ml 
\\)\ ,.| 20 mi i.ii ~. , ond till-, adds con- 
siderable weight to "in overall pro- 
im.ii.Mi.il backing l"i oui shows 
|ohn II I ckstein, directoi 

i >inil promotion, \B( 



Timcbuying terminology 

Idea! In this mad ^liirl "I words., how 
about dropping ROS foi BTA Besl 
Time Available Now sump'in else 

...i" and we've -<•! it whipped! 

Morton I W a mer, exec, vice 
- -ili-iii. Bartell Group 

• KH* ,. .1.. ibbr. .. ...... for Kun "I -.h..l..l. 

■ l.|.r ..I l.ii. 



. Ii. r. if m.. i. ii. . in. 
. I..... .. I.- 111. ........ i 

-. . .1 period 1 !•• t. r... HI V 
...h. .. ..i.l » ....I.I bl 



plargq ." 

. ..It... > l-r.. .-I 
I. ll.i. r.mlrtl 

. ir.i 



Tv and Radio Directory 

1 have -.ii'l ii before and I will ~a\ it 
the Vnnual I \ and Radio Hi 
rectory vou folks -«-n, I "lit i- one ol 
the handiest things ol it- kind. 
\\ allace Dunlap, general mat 
Middlesex Broadcasting, Boston 

Probably \"ii have gotten .>tli>i letters 
>>n this 1ml iii \<uir iu\\ l\ .in.l Ra- 
dio Directory "t New York and Chi- 

the < hicago listing shows I 
t\ Peters instead ol Pelers, t.ritlm. 
•dward. 

Vbo their new address is Pruden- 
tial Plaza. The telephone numbei .••- 

- He. 
Warwick Vnderson, account execui 
/.<v- Im/iTinn, Louisville 

• 111.- I')",: 1\ H ,.!,.. l.,r,.l..r. .* nil. Mr 
Irrr .if . hjrt;.- K.-.JU..I .h.ttilil 1>.- t.l.lr.- . -• -1 t ■- 
K.j.l.r.' s f r . i,-,. SPONSOR I'. .1.1 1. Jt ion. H> t 

n. !». i it . n > 








lerei 't<3 try, 

ST? • 

': 
i" - 



l9s A »aeles)'*^ 




SPONSOR 



12 i v\i vm 1957 







I'LL LETCH A IN ON 

SUMP/N HOT. . 





In California's Great Central Valley 
only |0 gives you 

TWO-FOR-ONE 




SACRAMENTO 



TOTAL AREA SET COUNT: 366,550 



In KBET's companion market alone latest * ARB studies reveal — Stockton modesto 




KBET-TV 

Station A (Sacramento) 

Station B (Sacramento) 



Sign-On to Noon 
38.9% 
11.3 
.0 



Noon to 6 P.M. 
14.8% 
9.6 
.0 



6 P.M. to Midnight 
31.7% 
8.6 
.0 



(*ARB Sets-ln-Use Summary, Nov. '56) 



KBET-TV • CHANNEL 10 






SACRAMENTO 



BASIC 




CALIFORNIA 

CBS OUTLET 



Call II-R Television, Inc. for Current Avails 



22 



SPONSOR • 12 JANUARY 1957 



3 RO (N SOR 




THE ALTERNATE WEEK PROBLEM 

With Ittl alternate %>. 59 every-week sponsorships <m nighl well i\ 
questions of show control. 1V« > and station lineups are created 



A%lt>'i iiair week sponsorship on television is "in- 
<>l those things some advertisers can 'l live with 
and yet can'l live without 

rhough the wordage ma) be hyperbolic, the 
thought behind il is not. For it is .1 problem of no 
minor proportions. Ii often means thai no majoi 
decision aboul a v - million investment can be made 
without consulting another part] whos eting 

aims maj n<>i be the same. 

The extent of this problem can be deduced b) 
the fact that, as "f the last week in 1956, there were 
\\ programs shared b) two advertisers on an alter- 
nate week l>a>i- cm nighttime network television. 
The 88 advertisers involved compared with 



h Ii" sponsored an ev< • show 1 1 - 

clients who bought ; 

a dozen shows. I In tin- 1 al< ulal 

who l>ii\- 
partii ipation - 

- 

• I he ra-h of shows in tr->u! 

- 
repla 

• 1 ents on nine s w ith !•■ 
rati' • 

• 
-1 0P1 2 !>• 



SPONxiK 



12 JANUARY 195*4 






As show-sharing spreads sponsors all over the 
network map, new buyers find themselves blocked 
because of adjacency protection rules 



• Tlic increase in alternate week spon- 
sorships ha> blocked sponsors seek- 
in- nighttime spots because of adjacen- 
cy protection regulations. 

Though alternate week sponsorship 
dates hack a lew years, not many pat- 
terns have developed in methods ol 
agenc\ cooperation, rhere are a few 
accepted practices in the matter of 
splitting commissions, agreeing on sta- 
tion lineups and prime responsibility 
for riding herd cm a show, but in most 
cases each issue that arises is settled 
by the sharing agencies fitting around 
a table and hammering out an accept- 
able agreement. Hut because common 
practices are not widespread and there 
is often iic i standard to fall back upon, 
hard feelings sometimes result. 

Yet no one has issued a call for 
doing awaj with alternate week spon- 
sorships. \\ bile advertisers mav differ 
about the disadvantages of shared 
programing, there is little dispute 
about it> advantages. 

These are basically two: il i econo- 
my and (2) the opportunity to capture 
a wider audience In splitting the bud- 
get among more than one- show. Some 
brands don "t have the budget for an 
every-week show. While participations 
also provide an answer to budget prob- 
lems, segmented shows usually involve 
practically no program control on the 
part of the agencj : whereas, a shared 
show often i though not always) gives 
the agency some >a\. a fact that, not- 
so-incidentall\. sils well with the client: 
plus the fact that brand identity stands 
out more stronglj . 

As for getting a wider audience, it 
has long been obvious that a substan- 
tial portion of an\ show's audience 
are regular viewers. It is logical, there- 
fore, to suppose that exposing a brand 
every week reaches a point of diminish- 
ing returns. Bu\ ing another show is 
likely to result in reaching new homo. 
Spreading a few more dollars between 
two shows (a few more dollars since 
alternate week sponsorship mav result 
in loss of some discount benefits) will 
thus reach a greater number of differ- 
ent homes. \l-o important: clients can 
spread programing ri-k-. 

Because of the major-minor pattern 



of alternate sponsorship, the loss of 
brand identity is not \er\ great >inec 
each client has at leas! one commercial 
ever') week. 

It is eas\ to exaggerate the problems 
cil two agencies getting together on one 
show because of the undeniable fact 
that the creative agency man. though 
used to group planning, is an individ- 
ualistic creature and that this individ- 
ualism is apt to come to the fore when 
two clients or two agencies have differ- 
ing philosophies and that's not un- 
common. 

On the other hand, it i- obvious that 
when two groups of people are in the 
same boat it is to the benefit of both to 
keep the boat afloat and running 
smooth I \ . 

The place where the latter pressure 
works most stronglj is where a show 
has two sponsors and one agency or 
two agencies and one sponsor. The 
latter instance is not alternate week 
sponsorship in the sense meant by 
SPONSOR i though product commercials 
alternate I but it provides an illustra- 
tion of agencj techniques in coopera- 
tion. 

For example, where P&G has two (or 
morel agencies on one show, one of 
them is established as agency of record 
and has primary responsibility for pro- 
ducing the show. If the non-produc- 
ing agency has an\ ideas or problems 
about programing, it funnels these 
through the producing agencj . The 
purpose of this policy is to minimize 
disagreements and provide an uncom- 
plicated liaison between agencj and 
producer. In the event of a serious 
disagreement on programing the issue- 
can be taken to P&G Productions. How- 
ever, the P&G method has worked well 
over the years and an appeal to high 
authority is rare. 

Another example: Until recently, 
when it lost Colgate, Esty's problems 
with two clients (R. J. Reynolds and 
Colgate I on Crusader and the Bob 
Cummings show were simplified bj the 
fact that it handled both. Now that 
Colgate i- berthed elsewhere Kst\ is 
I lie- "senior producing agencj in the 
Cummings time slot (the Crusader has 



been replaced b\ Mr. Attains & Eve*. 
sharing the time with the Carl S. 
Brown Go., a newcomer to the show 
and time period. 

The Esty-Brown relationship -pot- 
light- the question of the senior and 
junior agencj on a show. A senior 
agenc\ maj be defined as one which 
has been with the show or time period 
when another agencj and client move 
in to alternate. In the case of the 
Cummings -how. the situation is com- 
plicated bj the fact that the agencj is 
new hut the client isn't. 

There is an important issue sug- 
gested here: \ big question is what 
rights and responsibilities does an 
agencj and client who have worked on 
a -how or been in a time period for a 
longer length of time than the alternate 
client and agencj ? 

One rule of thumb is that franchise 
"rights" to both the show and time 
period give the senior client and agencj 
the most say. Thej will ha\e more to 
sa\ about the show, more to saj when 
a new show comes in to replace a tur- 
key and more to saj about lineup-. 
The senior agencj often asks — and 



3. NIGHTTIME 



I 




24 



SPONSOR 



12 JANUAR1 1957 






sometimes .•ii- .1 sei vice chai 
ill'- junioi agent j , 

Senioi status is mosl obvious in the 
. 1-. ..I .1 show I ik<- ) mil II il I'n 
.in \iiu-i H .in I ohai 1 o pai kage thai has 
been produced b) BBDO since tv'a 
earl) days Mi. status ol BBDO .- 
producei was unchanged when Warnei 
I [udnul moved in. \\ h nei I ludnul 
was in the |"i-iiiun ni .1 buyei and 
BBDO as . seller. BBDO took the 
attitude tli.it W arner-Hudnul bouj hi 
into .1 sui ' essful 1 ai V age and thai 
trols rem lins » iili BB1 >< * and its cl 

\\ hilr I ~i\ has made no representa- 
tions "ii the questions "I 1 Fee l"i — 1 1« » w 
servicing, .1 numbei ol agencies have 
taken the position thai the producing 
■.1 \ i» entitled l" one. I he quesl ion 
is how much? One producing agenc) 
recent!) .i-keil I")', of the commission 
from the non-producing agenc) with- 
oul getting it. 

I stirnates "I « hal it 1 osl an agent 5 
in actual!) service .1 show (aside from 
the commercials I \ .11 5 but .1 range "I 
H,000 i" 11,500 .1 week was men- 
tioned often. I his ' overs out-of-pockel 
costs and overhead. foi mosl shows. 



ANIKU IN II H 1 1 I 

Advantages of .litem.) re week ipofl 
ship economy and 
reach is resulting in more sharin 
shows Problems of agency cooperation 
cover show control lineups 

inter agency fees, program promotion 
and the sharing of commercial time 



"\\ 1m* re the show • ■■ I..IU 

wood, you h 
said .1 h e) 

il ) <>ii have 1 Hull) 
wood offii e. s ..11 
\ew 1 m k peopli 

ision Vnd thi 1 lienl en 
I hi- 1 ..-1 alone • 

md $100,000 .. v. 
ire it out, In- 1 ontinued. ^ 
1 .in hank on I2,(KK) pei pel 

1 1 ip to 1 1 ast. ^ ..11 1 .111 .il-.. 

mie shows \\ ill in\ «>l - 
man) .1- five to I" people trav< 
oul to tin coast \inl these 1 eople w ill 

three to foui trips 
lit people il ■ foi 



1 1 

third. I 

the noi 

tliinl of the > 

■ 

■ ■ 




A P H 



22 DEC. - 18 JAN. 



THURSDAY 

AIC CIS NIC 




f , . . .J Ml« iH 

ht . • ■ • - 



CI— », ^^p^^ 



Omar ~aM*MN*tei '••••" 

— wL3— 



.1 il .«t< 



Alternate week sponsoi 

i~ 1 1. ..r 88 different sponsorships. Thu 



sponsor • 12 .1 vm un 1951 







THOSE AGENCY MEETINGS! 

Some reps say there are more of them today than ever hefor* 
meetings are necessary. Tips given here are designed to help make your m) 



time salesman: Sims Dribble in 
Media, please. 

switchboard OP: One moment, sir. 
(Pause). 

secretary: Mr. Dribble's office. 
TIME salesman: Sims Dribble, please. 
secretary: Who's calling, please? 
TIME salesman: Cot Mather from 
S» hlepps' Reps. 

secretary: Well, I'm sorry, Mr. 
Mather, but Mr. Dribble is in a meet- 
ing:- 

TIME salesman: This is important. 
Will he be tied up for long? 
secretary: The rest of the dav. I'm 
afraid. The meeting just started. 

• • • 



low many times a day this brief 
Madison Avenue tragedy is re-enacted 
i- anybody's guess. Enough times. >a\ 
some station representatives, to just i f \ 
their stepping over the head of the 
meeting-bound timebuyer and calling 
directly on the client ad manager — - 
provided he, too, isn't in a meeting. 
Thus the meeting, an important 
form of communications, itself be- 
(i Hues a bottleneck in o\cr-all com- 



munications. It poses the question: 
Are agency meetings becoming too 
frequent and too long? I See SPON- 
SOR-SCOPE, 17 November sponsor, 
page 9) . 

There are some who feel they are — 
that a rash of meetings is keeping 
many tiinebuyers incommunicado from 
important breaks in broadcasting, that 
it also is responsible for many media 
personnel working overtime hours to 
catch up on routine work neglected 
while in conference rooms. 

"We're not in meetings all da\ 
long," says an agency executhe. 
"When a meeting is necessary, we 
hold one — as does am other business 



ARTICLE IN BRIEF 



Some reps find agencies today deeper 
in meetings than ever before. Admen 
doubt this is so but advertising today 
is a group operation and anything done 
to speed up meetings has big value. To 
that end, meetings should have specific 
goals. They should be studied for flaws. 



organization, including rep firms." 
"I'd say agency meetings have 
grown along with the advertising 
business," says a seller. ''It's up to 
us salesmen to plan our calls so a* not 
to conflict with their meetings. I make 
it a point not to drop in 'cold.' If I 
do, I know the buyer may be tied up 
and I won't get to see him." 

"Sure they're in a lot of meetings, 
but then advertising is a group effort." 
another station rep salesman savs. 
"Phone your timebuver for an appoint- 
ment first. If he's in a meeting, don't 
sit back and complain. Phone another 
prospect who isn't. That's the sales 
business'^' 

"If I were a salesman," says an 
advertising man. "and kept getting 
the old 'He's in a meeting' routine. 
I'd certainlv re-examine my selling 
technique. A bu\er alwa\s will find 
time to listen to something worthwhile. 
But a salesman who wastes the buyer's 
time often enough i» asking for the 
'meeting' brush-off when he calls 



'.-" 



The foregoing were just a few of the 
comments SPONSOR heard while explor- 



26 



-I'tixsOR 



12 JANUARY 1957 



ping is a group effort and 

and l>< lh r 




ing the meeting problem. I hal agency 
meetings are becoming more frequent 
i- the consensus. (hie ><\ the theories 
advanced was (hat there simpl) are 
more "fires t" pul out" toda) . \< i ount 
switching from agenc) t" agenc) 
make-, man) shops uncertain where 
the) -land with their clients. So the) re 
giving more and more attention to 
those accounts and this results in more 
meetings, ["he general opinion is dial 
-mall agencies an- jusl a- meeting- 
prone a- arc the large "me-. 

Advertising i- a fast-moving busi- 
New, importanl decisions musl 
nade from da\ to day, and these 
are rarer) the decisions of an individ- 
ual Main must be involved in these 
decisions and main must be informed 
of these decisions after the) an 1 made. 
It has been estimated thai 90 I of a 
business mi-take- are due to break- 
down in communications. The meet- 
ing plays an important role in com- 
munications. 

Advertising also i- a creative busi- 
ness, and creativit) is no longer the 
product of loneliness. The copywriter 



SPONSOR 



\2 .1 \m \u\ 1951 




MEETINGS continued... 

dur> not create a commercial in the 
solitude of an attic. The radio-tv com- 
mercial or the magazine lav out is a 
group product and where it will he 
run is a group determination. Market- 
inn, media. cop\ and radio-tv depart- 
ments all contribute to the campaign 
and contributions must he coordinated. 
The case for the conference is strong. 

But while intra-agency communica- 
tions are kept tight with meetings, isn't 
it possible this leaves some wires down 
between such vital outside contacts as 
the broadcasting field? Could fewer 
and shorter meetings accomplish the 
same purposes and permit, for ex- 
ample, timebuyers more time to keep 
up with opportunities of the industry ? 
Leaders in management study believe 
the) could. The meeting problem is 
not peculiar to Madison Avenue. Since 
the concept of "roup management 
picked up momentum in the early '40s, 
the conference has been under the 
microscope. For a decade. Harvard 
L niversity has conducted a continuing 
study of meetings — authentic meetings 
held within a "bugged," glass enclosed 
conference-lab. At Elizabeth. \. J.. 
Esso — one of a multitude of major 
companies concerned with the time- 
wasting aspects of meetings — has set 
up a conference training center for its 
executives. 

The American Management Associ- 
ation publishes a brochure, "Guide to 
Conference Leadership. conducts 
courses and clinics on the subject. 
George Odiorne. who heads AMA's 
intra-company management program. 
has a simple, three-point formula for 
cutting down on frequency and dura- 
tion of meetings: 

i 1 i Before calling a meeting, ask 
yourself, "Is it really necessar\ "'.'" 

i2l Invite only those who will have 
something to contribute. 

(3) At meeting's end. check on 
what actually was accomplished. 

Main meetings end on an inconclu- 
sive note, and this calls for still 
another meeting. Others consume far 
more time than i- needed to accom- 
plish a purpose. To hold down and 






shorten such sessions, Odiorne -u^- 
jiests that the subject of the meeting 
first be clearlv defined- and then stuck 
to. This is the mark of a good con- 
ference leader. The other essential is 
to set a terminal time and keep it. If 
the meeting is properly conducted, this 
terminus is not too hard to keep. It 
is the application of what Fortune calls 
'"Parkinson's Law. or the fact that 
people will fit work to the time allotted. 

The .National Industrial Conference 
Board is another organization inter- 
ested in improving meeting techniques 
so that an objective is accomplished in 
the shortest length of time. They are 
offering a series of five five-day semi- 
nars on the subject from January 
through May in New York. George 
V. Moser, one of the Board's special- 
ists, will conduct the sessions. Accord- 
ing to Moser, it is rare that a meeting 
will automatically proceed to a success- 
ful conclusion: it need- planning and 
guidance. 

"Most authorities." says Moser. 
"talk in terms of one or two hours 
for the average meeting. Main sub- 
jects cannot be handled adequatelv in 
less than an hour. Two hours are often 
more than enough to exhaust the con- 
centration of most people. Many meet- 
ings on routine matters can be taken 
care of in 15 minutes." 

The length of meetings has con- 
cerned many executives. Practices de- 
signed to shorten meetings range from 
holding stand-up meetings in chairless 
conference rooms so that no one gets 
too comfortable to scheduling session- 
near the workday's end. The latter is 
objected to 1>\ some on the grounds 
that late afternoon often finds the 
meeters too tired to focus attention or 
contribute their best idea>. 

One of the factors that contribute 
to excessi\el\ long meetings are un- 
cooperative participants. The respon- 
sibilities of a conference member are 
just as great as for a conference leader. 
I he leader must bring to the confer- 
ence a well-planned itinerary as well 
as an anticipation of where roadblocks 
or detours mav occur. The members 
must bring a spirit of cooperation and 
object i\ it\ . 

The previously-mentioned Harvard 
stud) reveals a pattern for practical!) 
all meetings regarding the roles of 
those who attend. The "cast" invari- 
abl) include- these characters: 

The Boss i he called the meeting). 



The Idea Man (he contributes most of 
the creative thinking i, The Conciliator 
(he smooths over personality con- 
flicts!. The Blocker the questions 
every proposal I . and The Best-Liked 
Gu) I he keeps the meeting on a 
pleasant level I . Interestingly enough, 
a series of meetings frequently begins 
w ith The Idea Man and The Best-Liked 
Gu) being the same person. Gradually. 
however, his easv flow of ideas causes 
resentment and jealousy among the 
others, and someone else becomes The 
Best-Liked Guy. "It's important that 
vou plan the conference with an under- 
standing of the group."' sav- \M V- 
Odiorne. 

As a tool correct!) used, the meet- 
ing should not constitute a problem 
for buyers or sellers. It is only when 
the meeting fails that time waste 
occurs — that it drags into extra hours 
and ends with nothing accomplished 
but a time set for another meeting. 

During the 1955 seminars of the 
National Industrial Conference Board, 
executives who participated discussed 
factors in their experience that caused 
meetings to fail. The three major 
reasons were: 

(1) Inadequate preparation. 

I 2 I Poor leadership. 

i 3 i Non-cooperating members. 

Another finding by the hoard is that 
all too often a meeting is held where 
the problem to be considered is not 
real. Or it mav be a real problem — 
but one which does not require a solu- 
tion, or one which the group members 
have reason to believe has already 
been decided. Such meetings serve bo 
purpose, and are the kind about which 
thwarted sellers have even right to 
complain. 

But accepting the fact that many 
meetings are held in good faith and 
consume a minimum of time, here is 
the opinion of Charles LeBlanc. of 
the Besearch Institute of Vmerica, an 
organization whose findings on man- 
agement problems serve more than 
3,000 companies. "The problem of 
meetings tying up buyers to the point 
where sellers can't get in to see them 
is basically a seller's problem.'" savs 
LeBlanc. "The properlv trained -ales- 
man mav find it sometimes irritating, 
but certainly not insurmountable. In 
fact, we have sales training programs 
that tackle this problem and offer 
guidance to sellers on how to circum- 
vent it." ^ 



SPONSOR 



12 JAM vtn 1951 




Clare can easily *i><>tl <i product s looks Producer uses IilIii tent toaster natural glou u-ithmit 

MAKE YOUR PRODUCT LOOK ITS BEST 

Tv product glamor i* made, not born, saj film commercial experts. Hei 
a round-up of their tricks-of-the-trade to \i'\w your product rv-appeal 



f^ nervous young account man. new 
on an account, paced restlessl) on the 
commercial producer's stage Hie cli- 
**iit had been ver) particular in his 
instructions. 

"I want to show oui new bottle ex- 
actly the ua\ it will look on super 
market shelves," he'd said, and now 
tin- }>r«.j> nun at tlu> film commercial 
studio were putting aluminum foil be- 
hind the bottle, pouring f 1 dye into 

the soft drink and general!) "tamper- 
ing with the product" 

when the account executive's nerves 

were -trained to the breaking point, 

the agenc) producer assigned t>> tin- 

•unt took him aside to calm him. 



"These boys kn<>\\ what t hf\ r»- do- 
he told th< . [Tie) aren't 

'tampering' v\ith the product Bui 
they've n"t to use make-up on it "i 
othei devices i" mal 
ai ross on tl - it would in 

realit) ." 

Moral "I tin- -!■ 
tv-sophisticati nan) admen ma) 

not be familiar with the tricks-of-the- 
trade film commercials producers have 
developed to translate products faith- 
full) t'> the viev nili- 
aril\ with some ol these dei 
helji you make vur own products 
more photogenic. 

rhese are 9ome of the usual 



unusual I tn> ks-of-th* 
b) film 

d in talk 

► ■ 

the i\ - 

"\\ ben vou'n 

■ 

tier 
ent 

I - M 

lions \ >»ith 



SPONSOR • 12 JANUARY 1957 



29 



Lighting, coloring, wax, chemicals help 

tv producers make products look good on tv 



normal chocolate icing would be likel) 
Id photograph hlack. \lso \ou gener- 
all) use yellow cake inside rather than 
white to avoid a glare from the light- 

There are other tricks film commer- 
cial producer? consider elementary in 
translating cake invitingl) to the 
screen. For example, icing is always 
appliqued at the last minute so that the 
decorative design wont melt down un- 
der hot lights. 

"If you show a woman slicing the 
cake, you may add crumbs to the 



hoard to iii\e the cake more real and 
appetizing appeal."' sa\s Mucciolo. 

Ice cream would be a real problem 
to film in the hot-house climate of a tv 
stage. Instead of ice cream, producers 
usual!) make special blends of creams 
and cream cheese, less likely to melt 
into sauce in the heat. 

"Don't eat the spaghetti cooked for 
a tv commercial, warn Transfilm pro- 
ducers. "'Ac put il into boiling water 
for just a second before shooting and 
pull it out while it's still quite hard. 
You cant really allow it to cook, or 





Cigarette length makes for smooth inhaling. To 
sell easj draw, Robert Lawrence showed cigarette 
floating in space with smoke drawing through. Ef- 
fect was achieved with chemicals, tubes and wiring 



it doesn't lie attractively in the bowl 
or plate. Also leaving it hard keeps 
the spaghetti from sticking and gives 
it better definition." 

The tomato >auce might look aw- 
full\ muddy in the grey screen without 
the addition of some vegetable d\es. 
In fact, there are few soft drinks or 
food mixes that don't get additional 
vegetable dyes for more attractive 
coloring. 

"We use vegetable dyes on foods 
when they're necessary for keeping the 
greys on film in proper balance," says 
Bill Morris, in charge of Eastern pro- 
duction at \\ tiding Pictures. 

► Beverages: Since film is "green- 
sensitive," any green bottle needs con- 
siderable doctoring. There are vari- 
ous ways of getting around the prob- 
lem of keeping proper color balance 
between the bottle and the drink: (1) 
Make the liquid darker with vegetable 
dyes. I 2 1 Buy a lighter bottle in the 
size and shape of the client's product. 
(3) Put aluminum foil behind the bot- 
tle to get the proper light refraction. 

Who puts the head on the beer? 
The prop man. 

Sometimes it is difficult to maintain 
a natural head on a glass of beer un- 
der the glare of the lights. The head 
the viewer sees sparkle and foam on 
the tv glass of beer is often a com- 
pound of chemicals with greater heat 
resistance than the normal head on a 
beer. 

► Cans, labels, packages: There are 
few\ if any. packages that don't require 
doctoring to come across on the screen 
as they do on store shelves. 

"Advertisers could save themselves 
a lot of mone\ in the long run and 
much time by designing their pack- 
ages and labels with tv in mind,' saya 




Beer looks flat without a head, yet foam won't stay 
undei glare "l strong lights. Sometimes film producers 
have i" put chemical head on brew Inline shooting. 
I ighting helps gi\< that appealing liquid sparkle 




Stanle) Johnson, x .n ra u dim toi 
"I ike all film | • r • >• I ■ j • -i b, we usualh 
have i" photograph the package label 
in black and-white and make u|> .1 new 
one to rendei the 1 "l"i - in 1 1 "i"-i l>.d 
ance "i greys. However, some labels 
,ii>- (lillh nil to render properl) despite 
tin- technique. For instance, .1 blai k 
and h hite rendition "f metallic lettei 
in- 1 which would refta 1 .1 glare if nol 
rephotographed in blai k and-w hite I 

1 evei appears c pletel) faithful on 

film to the ai iii.il pai kage. Vdverl is 
ers might also sta) awaj from too 
subtle color contrasts which lack sep- 
aration in gre) ." 

I here are, "I course, ai 1 -t n< I i. >~ 
which make dummj packages f<>r film 
producers when these are required. 
Sometimes, proper li-litin^ can com- 
pensate foi lack "I definition in 1 oloi 
1 ontrasts. ( tther times, photo-stats 01 
photo-copies have to be made "f the 
label, coi rected for color balance, and 
then placed on the package foi thi 
ai tual filming. 

There's a new trend in the han- 
dling of foil-wrapped f I- and othei 

products," says Lou Mucciolo. "I 
think there are times when you make 
a mistake if you dull the glitter b) re- 
placing the packaging or spraying it. 
\t times, it'- best to hold down the 
glare from metallic fi>il with lighting 
«>r with lighting tents because the 
wrapping maj actuall) make a cop) 
point. For instance, in foods, showing 
the glitter of the metallic wrapping 
ests thai the foil keeps the prod- 
uct fresh longer. With lighting, rather 
than b) using a corrected wrap, you 
can avoid unnatural flatness 01 pei f« 
tion in the package while it'- I.. 
moved 1>\ the performer. 1 ou can al- 
ways show a 'glare-corrected' label or 
package in the 'beauty-shot 1 or -till in 
the commercial." 

► tppliances, machinery: V film pro- 
dui er can't verj well order a dummy 
for a car or a washing machine or 
other sizable products, yet color ren- 
dition problems exist. There are sev- 
eral ways of handling these. 

W were filming some farm ma- 



ARTICLE IN BRIEF 

Making the client's product look as 
good in film commercials as it does 
in stores is a complex job. Commer- 
cials producers have developed many 
tricks to translate color labels faith- 
fully into tones of grey, show foods, 
and beverages with appetite appeal. 




1 



SS$T 



*t 



ir^' 



s\ 



A 

I 



-i> 




chim mercials, - - vi 

Pi< turc-' Bill Morris. "Sin< •• th< 
chinei j \\a- red. we would have 
lot oi the detail on the W • 

also had to ke< u balani ■ 

with the [performer- shown in the • 
men ial. I herefore, we put 

- that i-. gelatins, "n the li.:ht- 
direi ted on the mat hinery . I his [ 
the machinery more definition without 
making the pert - uid out un- 

natural!} ." 

S nilar problei in the dim- 

in- particularly with the nu- 

merous colors now fashionable. Vd- 
justments of such problems vary h 
• ial to the next, depem 
on setting and situati 

Sometimes se dulling - 




Shrimp 

■ 



wax "ii ' 

on tl 

!' 
II 
of tl 

- 
- 

him 

nth 



SPONSOR 



12 JANUARY 1957 



1 



THE STRATEGY BEHIND LEVER'S 
$3 MILLION NET RADIO BUY 

Flexibility lures Lever Bros, hack to network radio and to 

four daytime program strips daily to sell housewives en masse 



I he day of the big bu\ lias returned 
t<> network radio. 

One of the biggest of the recent new 
buys is the Lever Bros.' investment of 
some $3 million in CBS Radio pro- 
graming, a significant media move to 
observers in the marketing and adver- 
tising fields. 

Lever, as one of the nation's giant 
marketers in the hotly competitive soap 
held, is returning to one of its early 
radio program loves — the daytime 
serial. It's buying this format which 
has perennial appeal to housewives for 
the same reasons it bought "soaps" at 
the peak of its ardor for the medium: 
network radio delivers mass circula- 
tion and repetitive impressions inex- 
pensivel) . 

The basic reasoning behind the bin 
is the same. true. But the methodolog) 
is different. Today, as the form and 
structure of network radio have 
changed to accommodate the mass of 
advertisers instead of merelj the blue 
chip firms, Lever is able to buy a 
lle\ibilil\ which it never had before. 




Strategy planners in the $3 million buy 
include Henry Sharlitc I. \. p. in charge 
of advertising at Lever, and John Karol, 
r, v. j). in charge ol sales for CBS Radio 



This flexibility matches a need more 
pressing than the company has ever 
bad before — the need to reach an ever- 
larger number of homes with a barrage 
of sales messages at a reasonable cost 
in a uniquely competitive economy. 

Lever last week (2 Januai \ i started 
its new network radio advertising cam- 
paign keyed to flexibility here and now. 
More importantly, however, it has de- 
veloped with the CBS network a vehi- 
cle which yvill carry its advertising im- 
pressions in a variety of ways for a 
long time to come. Network radio is 
thus a short-run as yvell as a long-haul 
vehicle for Lever and its various prod- 
uct divisions. 

As a starter, the company is usint; 
the full network package for only three 
products. They are Breeze and Rinso 
Blue, items in the Lexer division, and 
regular Spry, a product of the foods 
division. 

They co-sponsor four daytime shows 
on the network. Helen Trent. Ma Perk- 
ins, Young Dr. Malone and House- 
party. Lever, as the parent company 
for all three products, buys one sex en 
and one-half minute segment in each 
of these programs each day of the 
week. \londa\ through Friday. In 
a week's time, it gets a total of 40 
separate commercial announcements. 
A lesser frequency is used by Colgate 
and Procter & Gamble, Lever's two 
major competitors, which buy similar 
daytime radio units on CBS. 

The In announcements are equally 
divided between minutes and 30 sec- 
ends, with one of each allowed as com- 
mercial time in each seven-and-one- 
half-minute program segment. Lexei 
has an intricate slotting arrangement 



whereby copy for each of the three 
products is rotated from program to 
program and hour to hour, from day 
to da) and from week to week, so that 
the network's total afternoon audience 
is exposed to all the varying product 
and copy themes. 

The schedules for the kick-off last 
week shows this balance among the 
quarter-hour shows: the 12:30-37 p.m. 
portion of Helen Trent daily : the 1 : 1 ">• 
22 segment of Ma Perkins daily: the 
1 :38-45 portion of Young Dr. Malone 



ARTICLE IN BRIEF 



r~ 

Lever launches '57 with $3 million 
CBS network radio buy to reach women 
regularly, often and inexpensively. 
Breeze, Rinso Blue and Spry co-spon- 
sor four afternoon shows daily. Poten- 
tial weekly reach: 53.8 million 
homes with some 90.9 million listeners. 

daily. The only time hopping last 
week came within Houseparty, a half- 
hour daily show from 3 to 3:30 p.m.: 
Lever went from 3:23-30 on Monday 
to 3:08-15 on Tuesday and Wednesday, 
back to 3:23 on Thursday and up to 
3-3:07 on Friday, reaching all 
ments ol the program's listening audi- 
ence. 

These Inning patterns, for ~>2 week-. 
yvill bring Lever a huge circulation 
and number of impressions — and that's 
what Lever is looking for. Henrj 
Schachte. advertising vice president ol 
the company, told sponsor "The buy 
is a great one. because we re going to 
reach a lot of people at a good <"-t. 
i Please turn to page 38 1 






SPONSOR 



12 JANUARY T)~>; 



LEVER BROS. 



$3 MILLION CBS PACKAGE 



These are the shows 



SHOW: Helen I renl I soap opera] 
TIME: 12:30-12:45 



SHOW: Ma Perkins (soap op 
TIME: 1:15-1: 10 

r " 



/ 



SHOW: Young Dt. Malo 

opera) 
TIME: 1:30-1:45 



'ftti& 



SHOW: Housepartj (audience 

participation ' 
TIME: 1-3:30 



THE STRATEGY BEHIND THE BUY 

Programing 

I he !'u i, mh d nl\ pi 

Levei 
ii. ni« in ea< li >.l tin- • 
Inn,- .in.l 1/,; Perkins, plu 
l>iiii\ . Products in\ ..K . i: l . 

Commercials 

Vnnouncemenl i ime illowerj in ea< h 
minute portion is 90 seconds, \*iili .|i\i- 
one product ihei Phi* 

men i.il- dail) . I" pei week, ("i sufTu 

repetition i" ~<-ll tin- low •< ..-t. In • 

Rotation 

Flexibility is .i basi< concept of I ind ii» product 

■ li\ isions, with segmented pr< Monda) thi 

affording big opportunity foi rotation of products and >■ 
mercial then • - Lever is ittenlion to the i opj 

mi theor) thai content must reinforce buj 

Circulation 

Big pari ol media buj i"^ rested on 

pej [ormani e in terms of audiem 

on Nielw n estimati - 20 su< li pi 

could delivei 75.7 million commercial minute famil) im| 

sions, and some 127.9 millioi minute listenei impi 

Expansion 

Ilii-. individual Lever products signed I 
h ill caiT) il • 'i. idvertisinf "lie 

and which matches their exa< t marketii 
company has als bu> wl 

insion to other divisions and ti 

Competition 

return t.. the realm .-f nel 
- 
I • ver differs, however, in its 
the n hours when i I 

almost .it the point "f pui 



iamssmm 



■mrin 



sponsor • 12 jaot u;\ 1957 



33 




$50,000 worth of radio, tv and newspapers in one week pulled this "million dollar crowd" to the four-dav outdoor sale 

CAN A DISCOUNT HOUSE AFFOH 

Profit is low, newspapers the standard media choice. Yet White Front of 
Los Angeles put 45% of budget into tv and sales jumped $6 million 



E3 \ i. Inn. i' is I he ke\ to a disi ounl 
house operation and only through tele- 
\ision could White Front Stores, Inc. 
reach enough customers to increase its 
sales $6 million in one year. 

\\ hite Front is now a two-outlet 
(the second store just completed) re- 
tail firm, which has been selling appli- 
ances and household products in the 
Los Angeles area for over 25 years. 
The firm grossed $3,750,000 in' 1955 
with a $150,000 advertising budget 
split 7<)', for uewspapers, 30% for tv. 
In L956, 15', of the $300,000 budge! 

was put into television and White 
Front sales soared to $9 million. 



The change in White Front's strat- 
egy started in March of 1956. when 
president Harry Blackmail, his wife 
Lillian, Sam Nassi, executive vice 
president and general manager of the 
appliance store, and Arnold Isaak of 
Robin, Lee and Arnold agency de- 
cided a greater concentration in tv 
would bring better results. I ntil that 
time White Front had used tv as a 
supplementary medium to reinforce its 
newspaper advertising. The tv sched- 
ule had been unsettled, shifting be- 
tween various stations, times and pro- 
grams. The new media plan called for 
longer-range bins to build up program 



identification and choice of a single 
tv outlet. KTL A. Los Vngeles. 

Feature films were regarded as the 
program-type most likely to attract 
potential customers so W hite Front be- 
gan sponsorship of two features Satur- 
day from 1:30 to 5:00 p.m., one on 
Sunday at 10:00 p.m. and one on 
Thursdays at 11:00 p.m. (immediatel) 
following boxing from the Olympic 
Arena). In addition the store bought 
I)o\ O'Dell's Western Theater, Tues- 
days, 5:30 to 6:00 p.m. plus an addi- 
tional half-hour of class "A" time, 
shifting from week to week. The idea 
behind the variation in time and pro- 






SI'ONSOK 



12 JANUARY 1957 



n i\ pe being i" i at< li different au- 
dience segments. 

\\ hite Fronl ■ earl) commen ials 
were remote telecasts From the ston 
showing products and the crowd <>f 
customers. According i" Nassi, tele- 
vision has brought so man) more i us 
tomers thai "there is no longei inj 

mi l"i the i'-l<\ i»i(m camera." I he 

i in i. ni commercial is a sti aight tele- 
1 .1-1 oi national!) ad\ ertised brand 
appliances m iili no pi ice quoted 
". . . because \\ hite Fronl is selling this 
iit'in at so much less than tin- nation- 
all) advertised price." < >i it a price 
i- show n. the bi and name i- 1 arefull) 
blanked out. This scrupulousness on 
the pari of \\ hite Fronl loses them 
nothing, f<>r the interested 1 iewei 
easil) recognizes the appliance and 
realizes the savings, rhese commer- 
cials are delivered live b) \lai\ Dean 
..1 ^.iin Benson. 

Tin- response that i«'l< - \ ision 1 an 
bring to a well merchandised, promo- 
tion minded firm was demonstrated l>\ 
the four da) sale W hite I 1 "<it held 
i\\\- pasl \|>ril. Because ol a fire 
which closed the store building, mer- 
chandise was displayed on a foui 
square-block open l<>t. Although nol 



ARTICLE IN BRIEF 

White Front Stores, Los Angeles, 
grossed $9 million in 56 with one 
appliance store jnd $300,000 w 
of advertisin.; 45% goes to tv, local 
shows Jt scattered times which the 
retailer merchandises and promotes in 
tensively 57 goal $20 million in ..lies 

one piei <• "t watei "i fire 
men handise was featured, the total 
volume "ii regular items exceeded one 
million dollars. 

Si irtii one week pi i"i t" 1 1 » • - 
date, In hours "I remote telei as) 
i\ announcements and extensive 1 1 
papei and radio ns promoted 

the event. W hen the gates were opened 
at I 1 * a.m. I 1 idaj . 18 \|>i il, thousands 
nf people who had waited in line for 
hours, Bwarmed ovei the sales 1 
Although free parking was provided 
foi ovei 2,000 1 11- there were thou- 
sands who were unable to gel near the 
lol bei ause of traffic and lai k oi addi- 
tional parking spai e. Men hants in 
non-competitive business in the 
reported 1 remendous traffic and I 



with 

\ l<l<\ 1 - 

•M wl Illd I' 

n fronl of a KTI \ 

"i "ii gel thi 

■ I I I Nil I 

couldn't l'ii\ 
\\ ill 

million 
1957, with .in ad 
lillion. 
" I hi 

dising, bad ; 

tisin 

busii ^ 



USE TV ? 





Scripts - telecasl b) K I I \ 

- dir. ; \mold Isaak. agenc) accn'l exec; M 
White Fronl announcer. \t r, Mi— White Front, Sandra I 
coaxes parakeel to -i\ "You never paj retail .11 White Front" 





Ballyhoo 



Lineup 










AND THE 







Pre-sold ! Everybody loves the stories of Hawkeye and the Last of the 
Mohicans, acclaimed by the Cambridge History of American Literature 
as "The most memorable character American fiction has given to 
the world." Here's audience-captivating TV fare for the whole family! 

Here's real excitement— the first "Eastern." Here's real action — the rude 
rough-and-ready frontier reproduced in the original French and Indian War country. 

Here's sales for you — but you must act quickly. Your first step to reserve the 
best markets and to increase sales is to wire or phone TPA collect today. 
Just say, "Let's pow-wow now." We'll set up a private screening of 
Hawkeye and the Last of the Mohicans for you in your own office. 




Television Programs of America, In\ 

EDWARD SMALL • MILTON A. GORDON • MICHAEL M. SILLERI 

Chairman President Executive Vice-Prel 

488 Madison Ave., New York 22, N. Y. • PL. 5-2* 




\ 



r 








I 



W '*A 



\ 



I 



A 



Based on James Fenimore Cooper's world -famed "Eastern" frontier action- classic starring 



Capsule case histories of successful 
local and regional radio campaigns 



RADIO RESULTS 



TELEVISION SETS 

SPONSOR: Firestone Stores AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Firestone Stores in Wenatchee, 
Wash., had never carried television sets, hut in October of 
last year the new manager decided to stock them for the 
firsl time. Selling television sets is a high!) competitive 
business, so Firestone Stores decided to trj radio advertis- 
ing. The sponsor ran a special weekend saturation cam- 
paign on station kPO which extended from 25-20 October. 
\ total <>l 50 ads using a western theme for "Philco Da\ 
I S \" were aired in announcements and on two di-k jocke) 
programs. The hour-long disk joekev shows were broad- 
cast direct!) from the store and during each one of these 
programs four television -els were sold. The ad promo- 
tion brought immediate results — a dollar volume of $3700 
from sales of television sets. Ben T. Weaver, Jr., produc- 
tion manager <>t station KPQ, stated that as a result of the 
campaign the -lure was firsl in sales of tv sets for the entire 
state. The cost of the campaign was $150. Firestone Stores 
has used the same promotion since, selling 60 tv sets in a 
slight!) longer period and here a price cut was also used. 



KPQ. Wenatchee, Wash. 



PROGRAM: Announcements & 
DJ Programs 



HARDWARE STORES 

SPONSOR: Palm S Shields Var. & Hardware AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Radio advertising brought the big- 
gest sale in its historv to the Palm & Shields Yarietv & 
Hardware store in Fresno, Cal. For the two-week period of 
the sale, Palm \ Shields realized a gross of over $8,000, 
more than twice the amount grossed in the immediately 
preceding sale which had lasted three week-. Ed Ohanian, 
the store's owner, said that Palm & Shields had never ex- 
perienced anything like the results obtained through its 
radio advertising on station KBIF. \ campaign was used 
consisting of 85 one-minute and 30-second announcements. 
The commercials were aired at various times during the 
two weeks the sale lasted. No other advertising was used. 
The entire campaign cost the advertiser onlj $271, 3.4% 
of the $8,000 grossed over the duration of the sale. This 
can he compared with figures from the preceding sale which 
had extended for a week longer. For that sale. Palm & 
Shields spent $1,800 in Fresno newspapers hut realized only 
a $4,000 gross. KBIF brought the store twice the sales for 
one-seventh the cost of the newspaper advertising campaign. 

KBIF. Fresno. Cal. PROGRAM: Announcements 



PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 

SPONSOR: Alan Charles Co. AGENCY: Elkman Co. 

Capsule case history: Its recent experimental tapping of 
the "nightowl market" demonstrated to this advertiser that 
people 'who stay up late often listen to radio in profitable 
numbers. The Alan Charles Co. of Philadelphia wanted to 
lr\ radio as a medium for selling its records. After consul- 
tation with its agency, the firm decided to run a one-week 
tesl campaign on WCAI . The vehicle selected for the cam- 
paign was /// Vight Hatch, a post-midnight program fea- 
turing Johnnie Lupton. The commercials made a special 
hi. iil ordei offei to sleepless WCAU listeners: A Glenn Mil- 
lei RCA Victor record album. 15 rpm, for $10.45. Fred 
Bi ml >a ii in. WC\l - promotion director, reported an imme- 
diate heav v response to the offer. Some 111 return- came in 
during the first week, causing the sponsor to extend his tesl 
campaign for another week. The second week brought 66 
mail orders and the firm then purchased a 13-week contract. 
\Hi i 33 days, 283 orders for the album had been received. 
I In- means a return of nearly $3,000 on the special offer 
alone, for a total expenditure <>f approximate!) $518. 



W< \l . Philadelphia 



PRO(,li Wl: /// Wight Watch 



BUSINESS DISTRICTS 

SPONSOR: Thirty Whiting Merchants UJENl , i : Direct 

Capsule case history: The problem of how a downtown 
shopping district can attract and hold trade was tackled last 
year by a group of small town merchants in Whiting. Ind. 
Their technique: a cooperative radio campaign tied in with 
a contest. Thirtv merchants in downtown Whiting spon- 
sored a 20 week campaign on radio station W JOB. Spot 
announcements and 5 minute newscasts were used. The 
commercials began with a transcribed jingle promoting 
downtown W biting as a place to shop, followed b\ a live tag 
carrying the advertising message of one of the participat- 
ing stores. The commercials also included information 
about a $2,000 prize contest undertaken as part of the pro- 
motion. Joseph R. Fife, commercial manager of YvJOB, 
-avs that on the basis of the number of contest entry blanks 
which had been mailed to the station, the promotion was 
highly successful in increasing store traffic at a low 7 cost 
for each participating merchant. During the course of the 
campaign W JOB received 100.000 entrv blanks which means 
|ll(). (Kill potential customers entered the group of stores. 

WJOB, Hammond, tnd. PROGRAM: Newscasts, Announcements 






SPONSOR 



12 JANUARY 1957 




YOUR 



(abcj 



STATION 



•According to November 1956 A R B Report KTVX leads all Tulsa Stotiont witfi 71 
most popular quarter hours from 4 30 p m til 1 1 00 p m Monday through Fndor 



This ARB proves th.it Northeastern Oklahoma has t.iken 
.i W.\ look' at KTVX's Preferred Program mil 
I\opk watch Programs not channels And it's Just 
tin Beginning. 1 

So put your mono where the .iinlietiee iv ( he e k KI\\ 
r.ltes .mil eo\er.iue and re.le h Oklahoma's b n.irket 



Seeyour IVERY-KN0DE1 Reprtsentathn 
Vf/KI sn\PlR(). Managing Dim 



TULSA BROADCASTING COMPANY 

MUSKOGEE • TULSA 




SPONSOR • 12 .1 \M vRY 1957 



41 



SPONSOR ASKS 



How much should the film commercial producer 
contribute to the creation of ideas for a commercial 





Rex Cox, creative director, Sarra, Inc., 
New York 

The answer to this question depends 
entirely on the television department 
and creati\c staff of each agency. In 
case where a large agency has a com- 
plete television and film department 
with experienced creative talent pre- 
paring the storyboards, there is, of 
course, little need for much creative 



"product 
problems and 
taboos' 



contribution on the part of the pro- 
ducer from the idea or storv stand- 
point. There is no question but that 
the agency is in a better position to 
know the client's product and prob- 
lems, and all the taboos. 

However, much can be accomplished 
toward the production of a better film 
commercial, if the producer is called 
in by the agency before the idea or 
script is presented to the client. For 
example, if there is a budget problem, 
the producer can be of invaluable as- 
sistance in suggesting how the picture 
can be shot to accomplish the same ef- 
fect at a lower cost. 

There are many times when the bud- 
get is set and the script approved be- 
fore the producer is called in — then it 
is discovered that the cost is prohibi- 
tive. This type of partial planning 
has given some producers a reputa- 
tion for being "high priced," when 
they are simply quoting on a script 
exactly as it was written. Usually a 

i ise in production after initial 

. is not entire!) satisfactory. 
ideal working arrangement is 



where a film producer is called in b\ 
the agency for preliminary conferences 
before the script is completed. 

\\ here an agency does not have a 
complete staff, the film producer 
should be able to create the commer- 
cial from beginning to end. Natural- 
ly, this creative work cannot be done 
without the complete cooperation of 
agency and client. The assistance of 
the agenc) art director is particularly 
valuable for his experience in the dis- 
play possibilities of the clients prod- 
uct. 

But even where all the creative work 
is done by the agency, a film producer 
should be selected for his creative 
staff, and not merely as a vendor of 
facilities and equipment. 



Mickey Schwarz, president, ATI Film 
Productions, Inc., Long Island City, N. Y. 

Because of established precedent, tv 
film commercial producers have be- 
come primarily service organizations. 
This, unfortunately, has made the pro- 
ducer "low man on the totem pole." 

It is my belief that a reputable crea- 
tive producer has a good deal to con- 




"producer 
is held 
responsible' 



tribute to the production of a commer- 
cials. Commercials as we know them 
today, are the outcome of many ideas 
submitted by copywriters, art depart- 
ments, research and agenc) producers. 
Consequently, for a producer to be 
held responsible for a production in 



other than its technical aspects, he 
should be called in with his director 
and cameraman to confer with the 
originators of the commercial. Thus 
he will readily absorb their thoughts, 
suggestions and intent at first hand. He 
should be in a position to contribute 
creatively to any degree as long as 
the latter enhances the end result of 
the commercial. 

As a case in point, during the last 
six months of 1956. we were assigned 
to produce a series of 20 commercials 
for McCann-Erickson and their client, 
Chesterfield cigarettes. We were fur- 
nished audio solely and, along with 
the agency producer, developed all of 
the pictures, moods and background. 
\\ e are quite proud of the fact that we 
batted 1000% with the agency and its 
client and because of this type of 
planning have never had one frame of 
picture changed. 

Instead of planning storyboards, we, 
in conjunction with the agency pro- 
ducer, prepared "shooting boards'' 
graphically illustrating background, 
camera angles and movement. 

A short time ago we were called in 
l.\ an agency and sat down with its 
research group to develop a new ap- 
proach to film commercials. They pre- 
sented us with all the facts pertaining 
to the product: target market areas, in- 
come group, psychological approach of 
the sell, etc. "Take it from here" was 
the order. We developed story lines, 
scripts ami storyboards, complete with 
camera angles and sound effects for a 
series of commercials. This, we think, 
is the first time that a film producer 
was able to cooperate with an agenc] 
and contribute his thinking for a cli- 
ent s presentation by the agency. 

To use a tired but effective cliche: 
"two heads are better than one." \f- 
ter all the agencx and all its depart- 
ments and the producer as well, are 



42 



SPONSOR 



12 JANUARY 1957 




interested in onlj one i on< lusion and 
thai i- i" satisfj the clienl and se< un 
the best results. 



Jem Bl.ikc, president, Georgi 
rprises, ^ nc ) orh 

1 1 n ■ world "I the tele> ision commei • 
ii. il i~ often the woi l<l of the one-min- 
ute stage. I he pi in< ipal objective is 



not to create 

but to 

interpret" 



\" simultaneous!) entertain the viewei 
while getting tin- message of the spon- 
boi ai ross in the allotted time spa< e. 
The job nf the producer of television 
commercial films is to translate into a 
\ i-11.1l medium the creation "I words 
and iil<-.i« .1- designated l>\ the adver- 
tising agenc) or client ["his is th>- 

prime function ol a g 1 teta ision 

commercial producer. Ii is his < lut \ to 
interpret "ii film the ideas thai have 
been sel l"i 1I1 in 1 ti<- words and story- 
board pictures created "i suggested b) 
the personnel « ithin the agenc) . 

In Borne cases considerable latitude 
i> given the producer in an attempt t" 
achieve the besl end results. On the 
other hand there are m. un instances 
where a television commercial must 
nade without an) deviation from 
tin' specifications set b) tin- advertising 
agency. Ilii- will \ar\ with different 
type commercials and various agen- 
cies. 

There .ire certain inherent factors in 
the making ol .1 television commercial 
that make it almost impossible for the 
producer to contribute the actual idea 
creation. 

fhese factors are: Commercials are 
Mealed In advertising agencies with 
the approval of the client Second!) 
commercials are put out on a com- 
petitive bid basis. Therefore there i~ 

a cost factor involved. It is onl) after 
these factors are considered thai the 
commercial film producer comes into 
the picture. Our function is nol to 
create hut rather to interpret and en- 
hance. We are t.eor-.' Blake Enter- 
prises feel the good television pro- 
ducer should fulfill these services to 
give both the agenc) and the client the 
besl possible selling job. ^ 




ONE WILL DO J 



You bag the biggest game in Columbus and 
Central Ohio with just one station . . . WBNS 
Radio. No need to scatter your shots, WBNS 
delivers the most (and the best) listeners . . . 
twice as many as the next biggest station. 
With 28 top Pulse-rated shows, WBNS puts 
push behind your sales program. To sell Cen- 
tral Ohio . . . you've got to buy WBNS Radio. 



CBS FOR CENTRAL OHIO 

Ask John Blair 

The number one Pulse station 
covering 1,573.820 people with 
2 Billion Dollars to spend. 



rrffl 



radio 

CCH.UMBUS 



SPONSOR 



12 J \m \ry 1957 



43 







\ 1 



* 







■ 



KINGAN MEATS, through 
Lindsey and Co., reports: 

"The Cisco Kid played a 
large part in the most 
successful promotion we 
have ever run . . . While 
I will not give you the ac- 
tual percentage of sales 
increase, I can tell you 
that the sales increases 
were very substantial." 

Ask to see more success stories of 

THE WORLDS GREATEST SALESMAN! 

"THE CISCO KID" 



c36&&Mi?n> 






Agency profile 



Blayne Butcher: grass-roots and music 

"It's easy in the agency business to become too far removed from 
the local station operation," -a\s Blayne Butcher, \l Paul Lefton 
Co.. Philadelphia, tv business manager and program and timebuy- 
ing advisor. The agenc) handle- some ■ >(> accounts ranging from 
division- of RCA to station WFIL-TV, Philadelphia, to package 
j I-. transportation and tobacco accounts. 

Butcher's been living up to his "grass-roots" philosophy and, 
with all his activity in advertising agencies over the years, has 
managed to maintain constant and close touch with radio and tv 
station management. 

"Being close to station management, and yel not a part of it. can 
help one to be a liaison or interpreter between the media buyer, the 
client and the station." says Butcher. "Sometimes client-, and 
agencies too, make impossible requests of stations and then they're 




Butcher and his wife, formerly a professional singer, love music, show business 

disappointed when the) can't clear certain times or get the ratings 
the) want. Of course, it's understandable in a way, since rising tv 
costs put the pre— nre «n stations to produce results, but these re- 
sults can*t necessarih be measured in rating-. You need to stick 
with an announcement schedule as much a< with a program to give 
it a chance to produce sales. 

Butcher feels particularly keenly aware of the differences between 
television and radio and takes these into account in his dealings 
with clients. 

"For instance, I do think advertisers need to be willing to invest 
time as well a> inone\ into their t\ lun to give it a chance to pro- 
duce. At the same time, the value "I t\ shows is far more short- 
lived than radio show-. People tire more of tv performers than 
the) did of radio talent. The pressure- on agencies and all pro- 



SPONSOR 



12 JANUARY 1957 



i souri bb i me up » itli new i, ili ni I'- i 

linuousl) . 

In Butchei - case ~ 1 1 . ■ w business experienn trail) Hi 

will- was .1 professional singei on the \\ . I »he pei 

formed undei the name "I K.iiliKn t halfont. 

"Most ni inn hobbies have t" do with show lm~iiir — m 
I < • i r • i 01 other, says Butcher. "Whenevei I m called in bj .i local 
it at ion a- .i consultant, Kathlyn comes along »itl> tin 01 
-In- knows uli.ii station operations are .ill about. > li<- wrol< 

i Op) beiO] B Wt -' 'I ni. II i led. 

( opywriting seems i" occup) tin- entire distafl side ■■! the family. 
Butchei has a daughtei in California who's u igenc) cupywritei 

Local markel knowledge improves advertising 

"I iliink agencymen in all areas "I ail media activit) need i" 
localize theii thinking," says Butcher. "< ommercial writers, t"i 
Instance, don't general!) gel in local stations often enough ** • i 
seeing tin - problems <>f tin- local stations and understanding theii 
relationship i" the markel would help orient theii commeri ials mon 
closel) i" iin- consume] . 

Butcher, an easy-going man In hi- forties, with salt-and-peppei 
hair, like- t<> talk to people in man) fields and of diversified intei 
eats, ll«- has the relaxing and comfortable manner "I a man who 
enjoys people and makes them feel al easu 

"In a service industry, such a- advertising, and in communica- 
tions, \"n can i afford i" _<■! i"" in awa) from people," In- told 
sponsor. "You rani address people in a vacuum. When you write 
a i\ commercial, you re looking foi the thing thai makes people stop 
and \ iew it. I hi- i- something you can't do it you've l"-i touch." 

Butcher feels thai while basic motivations maj remain unaltered, 
people's tastes, particular!) in these days ol television, change ver) 
rapid!) . 

"One thing (hat doesn't change is the fact that people are inter- 
ested in themselves and their immediate neighbors," hi- added. 
"And advertisers air becoming increasing!) aware ol tin- need t" 
localize sales approaches. When I've been involved in station man- 
agement, I've always re imended a great deal id local covei 

\ml I like I" see more people involved in local programing local 
people, and imi necessaril) tin- professionals, linn- an appeal and 
a persuasiveness aboul seeing one's neighboi on television, fur in- 
stance, that ma) Imltl the audience as surel) as a slick, professional 
performance." 

0! course, Butchei - quick in ~\>\<\ that he ha- enjoyed hi- work 
on highl) professional network t\ programing a- much a- local 
operation, if on a different level. In previous agenc) associations, 
In- worked on such shows a- Suspense, Beat tin I 
Maugham Theater. 

"\ like tn see the growth of tin- magazine concept in t\ program- 
ing and thr rotation ol clients," says Butcher. "It gives more ad 
bsers an opportunity tn use the medium. Besides, I fe< I that the 
editorial content, the programing, i- actual!) a network responsi- 
bilit) in the ua\ that the editorial content "t a magazine is the 
responsibility of the publication. Theoretically, network and client 
interests should reall) no! conflict. Vftei all. it's in the network's 
interest tn attract a- mam people a- possible, and that- what the 
client want- too." ^ 












SPONSOR 



12 .1 VM ^K 1 ! 195 . 






!** 



t 




THE 



EYESh 



AVE IT! 



Hfff orr thr r*\ultt O* another tlt( 
tion with fouri««n tountiri r»oo- 

WRiX-TV wmi with a trtmtndout 

plurality H*r« it thr *o»r 

14-COUNTY PULSE SURVEY 
SEPTEMBER, 1956 

All 53 of the top 53 
Programs are on WREX TV 

63 of the fop 65 
Programs are on WREX TV 
• 
COMPARATIVE QUARTER HOUR 

RATINGS 
WREX TV- 440 Quarter Hours or 

100% 
STATION B—0 Quarter Hours or 0% 

Serving over a Que' 

Mill.on TV c ■ 

• 

WREX TV Dommofes all Qu 

Hour Periods Sunday thru Saturday 

8:00 A.M. — M.dn.ght 

Thu unjnimowtl. 

No 1 TV buy m * billion d 



- 

It IlllltOit - 






(^WRE*«TV 



•» r o m o 



CBS-ABC AFFILIATIONS 
telecasting in color 

REPRESENTED BY 

H-R TELEVISION, INC. 



tf 



A weekly listing of changes 

in the advertising and broadcast fields 



NEW AND RENEW 



NEW ON TELEVISION NETWORKS 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



AC Spark Plug Div Ccn Motors, Flint, Mich Brother, Detroit ABC Sugar Bowl Pre-Came Warmup; Tu 1:45-1:55 pm; 1 Jan only 

Best Foods, NY -Guild, Bascom & Bonfigli, SF ABC Calen Drake Show: Sa 7-7. JO pm: 12 Jan 

Carter Products. NY SSCB, NY NBC 80 Nat King Cole; M 7:30-7:45 pm; 7 Jan-18 Mar 

Dodge & Plymouth Divisions — Chrysler, Crant, Detroit; Ayer, Phila ABC _ Music of Ray Anthony & Lawrence Welk; M 10:30 pm-1 :30 



Detroit 
Nestle, White Plains, NY 
Standard Brands, NY 



Vitamin Corp of America, NY 

|. B. Williams. Clastonbury, Conn 

Youngstown Kitchens, Warren, Ohio 



Mc-E, NY 
Bates, NY 



BBDO, NY 
JWT, NY 
Crey. NY . 



am; 31 Dec only 
CBS 74 Our Miss Brooks; alt Th 2:15-2:30 pm; 10 Jan; 52 wks 

NBC 60 Queen For A Day; alt Tu 4:15-4:30 pm; 15 Jan-31 Dec; 26 

parties 

NBC 129 Steve Allen; Su 8-9 pm; 20 Jan-31 Mar 

CBS 175 Phil Silvers Show; alt Tu 8-8:30 pm; 12, 29 Jan, 12 Feb only 
ABC _ America Salutes Kate Smith; Su 9-10 pm; 28 Apr only 



RENEWED ON TELEVISION NETWORKS 



SPONSOR 

Brown & Williamson, Louisville 
Brown & Williamson, Louisville 



AGENCY 



STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Russel M. Seeds, Chicago NBC 66 _lt Could Be You; alt W 12:45-1 pm; 31 Oct, 19S6-16 Oct, 

1957 
Russel M. Seeds, Chicago NBC 63 ...Queen For A Day; alt M 4:15-4:30 pm ; 5 Nov, 1956-21 Oct, 

1957 



Brown & Williamson, Louisville Russel M. Seeds, Chicago NBC 90 _Tennesse Ernie Ford: alt W 2:45-3 pm; 9 Jan-25 Dec; alt M 

2:45-3 pm; 14 Jan-30 Dec 

Kraft, Chicago JWT, Chicago NBC 111 ...Kraft Tv Theater; W 9-10 pm; 2 Jan-25 Dec 

Swift, Chicago Mc-E, Chicago . NBC 90 Tennesse Ernie Ford; alt M 2:45-3 pm; 21 Jan; alt W 2:45-3 

pm; 30 Jan; 52 wks 



BROADCAST INDUSTRY EXECUTIVES 



NAME 

John M. Brigham 
Kenneth Chcrnin 
Ansley D. Cohen, Jr. 

Charles Davies 

Donald K. deNeuf 

Harry Foster 

Perry Hamilton 

Cuy Harris 
Dale E. Hart 

John Klemek 

Robert A. Lazar 
Roland H. McClure 

Paul F. Miller 

Chct Pike 
William Pomeroy 
Robert T. Schkinkert 
Alvce Rogers Sheetz 
Edward D. Taddei 
W. L. Woods 



FORMER AFFILIATION 

WATV, Newark, -NY, sis 

Triangle Publications, Phila. promotion dept 

WUSN-TV. Charleston, SC, acct exec 

Crosley Broadcasting, NY, sis 

Rural Radio Network, Ithaca, NY, gen mgr _ 

WCAE, Pittsburgh, sis mgr _ _.. 

WLS. Chi, asst-sls prom dept 

WOWO. Fort Wayne. Ind, program mgr 

KARK-TV, Little Rock, Ark, dir operations-programing 

WLS. Chi, sis exec 

WBEE, Chi, asst mgr 

KNX-CPRN, LA, acct exec 

WCKY, Cin, special events dir 

WTMA, Charleston, SC, acct exec 



WKRC-TV, Cin, gen sis mgr _ _ 

Jaffe Publications, LA _ 

Elm City Broadcasting Corp, New Haven, Conn, exec vp 
WCTV-TV, Tallahassee-Thomasville, Fla, nat sis mgr _ 



NEW AFFILIATION 

WHCTitv), Hartford, Conn, acct exec 

Same, promotion super-radio-tv div 

WTAL, Tallahassee. Fla, mgr 

WCN-TV, Chi, nat tv sis, NY office 

Press Wireless, NY, vp 

WBMS, Boston, sis promotion mgr 

Same, prom & publicity mgr 

KDKA. Pittsburgh, program mgr 

KOTV. Tulsa, program & operations dir 

Same, sis devel mgr 

WEBB. Baltimore, asst mgr 

CBS Radio Spot Sales, LA, office mgr 

Same, program dir 

WTAL, Tallahassee, Fla. operations mgr 

Major Television Productions, Detroit, sis rep 

Same, also asst gen mgr 

KVAL-TV. Eugene, Ore. prom mgr 

WNHC-AM-FM-TV. New Haven. Conn, gen mgr 

WCTV-TV & WPTV-TV, Palm Beach, Fla, nat sis mgr 



ADVERTISING AGENCY PERSONNEL CHANGES 



NAME 

Leslie L. Dunier 
Emerson A. Elliott 
Paul H. Jeynes 
Jules Lennard 
Joel L. Martin 
John |. Nelson, 
Donald N. Preuss 
Custave L. Saelens 



|r. 



FORMER AFFILIATION 

Emil Mogul, NY, dir r-tv . 

Fletcher D. Richards. NY, vp-media dir 

Morey, Humm & Warwick, NY, acct exec 

Emil Mogul. NY, dir mktng & merch 

Fmil Mogul, NY. dir media & research 

Stanford Research Institute, research sociologist 

Weil Clothing Co. St. Louis, publicity dir 

Ceyer, NY, production mgr 



NEW AFFILIATION 

Same, also vp 

Ogilvy. Benson & Mather, NY, media dir 

Lcnnen & Newell, NY, acct exec 

Same, also vp 

Same, also vp 

Honig-Cooper, SF, research dir 

Frank Block Associates. St. Louis, acct exec 

Same, mgr production & traffic dept 



NEW FIRMS, NEW OFFICES (Change of address) 



Comprehensive Service Corporation has formed a California branch with 

offices at 6674 Santa Monica Blvd. Hy 
Ingalls-Miniter Company, Boston agency, has become Ingalls-Miniter- 

Haughey Company 
Lloyd Pearson Associates, NY, will have new offices at 509 Madison Ave. 



Pulse, Inc., NY. has new headquarters at 730 Fifth Ave 

Murray Sokol. Inc.. NY, new in advertising-marketing field, has offices 

at 120 W 42nd St 
Weiss & Ccllcr, Inc., Chicago, has become Edward H. Weiss & Co. with 

new offices in the London Guarantee Bldg, 360 N Michigan Ave 






SPONSOR 



12 JANUARY 1957 



JuSt fop ffrll 



BEFORE YOU 

BUY SO CALIF 

CHECK NIELSEN 



KPO'P 



dial 1020 



i 1,1 









IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA'S 6,000,000 PLUS MARKET 

"THE OLD ORDER CHANGETH..." 



CC'POIP* 



NOW THE NO. 1 



INDEPENDENT 

LosAnge , e > HIGHEST SHARE OF 

AUDIENCE IN THE PEAK TRAFFIC TIMES 



6 A.M. TO 9 A.M. 
3 P.M. TO 6 P.M. 



•NOVEMBER NIELSEN 



NEW YORK 



Let a BROADCAST TIMES SALES 

representative give you the complete 

K PO P STO R Y 

CHICAGO • DETROIT 



DALLAS 



SPONSOR • 12 .1 INUAR1 1951 



KTBS-TV 

LEADS 

according to latest 

NIELSEN 



National and regional spot buys 
in work now or recently completed 



* 




MONTHLY COVERAGE 

Homes Reached, 136, OUU 
A Bonus of 6,740 over Station B 

TELEVISION HOMES 

in KTBS-TV Area 157,980 
A Bonus of 13,1 20 over Station B 

N.C.S. No. 2, Spring 1956 

KTBS-7i> 

CHANNEL 




SHREVEPORT 
LOUISIANA 

E. NEWTON WRAY. President & Gen. Mgr. 

NBC anJ AEC 

Represented by 



Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 



SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

R. T. French Co., Rochester, \. Y., for it- French Spaghetti Sauce, 
starts its firsl spol t\ drive for the product 23 January with <la\- 
time schedules in nine major metropolitan markets. Filmed minutes 
will be aired at the average rate of five announcements weekly. 
Agency: Compton, New York. Buyer: Martin Foody. 

Southern Biscuit Co., Richmond. \ a., for its I I \ Cookie-, moves 
into a tv campaign (after using spot radio) in mid-February, with 
2d s and minutes in daj and night time periods for from -i\ to 
13 weeks in each of 15 markets. Concentration is in tlte South. Last 
and Southeast. Buying has not been finished. Vgency: Hilton & 
Riggio. New York. Buyer: Maria Cara\a-. 

Louis L. Libby Food Products, Inc., Long Island City, will 
advertise its Red L frozen foods with saturation schedules on eight 
to 10 markets starting late this month. Minutes and 20's. dav and 
night, will be used. Agency: Hilton & Riggio. Buying is not com- 
plete. Buyer: Maria Cara\as. 



RADIO BUYS 

American Home Foods, New York, for Burnett Flavors, begins 

a campaign in 24 markets for 13 weeks on 2<'5 January. Most areas 
are West of the Mississippi, main distribution territory. Announce- 
ments vary from 70 to 200 per market, largel) concentrated during 
the daytime hours on Thursday and Friday. Eight and 10-second 
taped announcements will sell "pure natural cake mixes and qualit\ 
flavors." Agency: Gever Advertising. X. Y. Buyer: Ed Richardson. 

Knouse Foods Cooperative, Inc., Peachglen, Pa., has just started 
buying announcements for iis product. Luck) Leaf Applesauce. 

Planned is a 13-week campaign in 12 market areas. \gencv : V \\ . 
\^ry. New York. Buyer: Bill Millar. 

Chilean Nitrate Bureau, New York City, starts its second big 
campaign of farm radio announcement- next week in 75 to 80 
Southern markets for its fertilizer. The schedule provides for 13 
weeks of one-minute participations given live l>\ station farm direc- 
tors in morning and mid-da) local programs. Agency: Erwin, 
\\a-e\. New York. Buyer: William Hunter. 

Shu I ton Inc., New York, for it- new Thylox medicated shampoo, 

product of its pharmaceutical division, launches its first full-scale 
radio drive next week in 25 major markets for 13 weeks. Buying 
pattern: 10 announcements weeklv in the top five markets, five 
commercials during the week and five on weekend: six announce- 
ments we.-klv in the remaining 20 area-, all slotted in weekend 
times. Radio schedules are expected to continue and to be extended 






SPONSOR 



12 JANUARY 1957 




From OMAHA 



Heart of the rich Nebraska-Iowa corn-lands — 

come the world's finest meats. Whether youi picli runi ti 
thick, well marbled r-bone or juic) prime rib* — t.ik« yout an 
from the [Moh-sv.ion.ils. For in the finest restaurants everywh* 
"OMAN \ Bl II - means the bestl 



— and, in OMAHA — WOW-TV means the Best of televiewing — 

Prime listening in Omaha — like its prune beef, is built on 
outstanding qualities. WOW-TV serves onlj th<- bestl ( ban 
'^/J^ " ; ^bV , C'\ m ' ^ builds real audience loyalt) from its blend ol ( BS I\ 

~^ ^u ^SS& 1 1 * \ 

fine programs, top local shows, syndicated programs and choice 

feature dims. 

And now, to this star-studded entertainment menu, WOW 
TV adds a neu piece de resistanct — the great MGM library — 
making the BE:ST even better! 

OW-TV R 

FRANK P FOGARTY, Vice President and Generol Monoger 

FRED EBENER. Commercial Manager ' 






IN OMAHA it's WOW and WOW-TV 

IN SYRACUSE it's WHEN and WHEN-TV 

IN PHOENIX it's KPHO and KPHO-TV 

IN KANSAS CITY it's KCMO and KCMO-TV 



represented by BLAIR-TV Inc 

represented by The KATZ Agency 

represenfed by The KATZ Agency 

represenfed by The KATZ Agency 



Meredith Stations are affiliated with Better Homes and Gardens and Successful Farming Magazines 



SPONSOR 



12 J\M VR 1 ! I95't 






Spot buys continued. 






THERE'S ONLY ONE LEADER... 

KMJF TV4 MONTANA 

THE CONTINENTAL DIVIDE STATION , BUTTE 






^LUMBER 
^AGRICULTURE. 



AN *ED 2n :.- "<>» 






assess; 



C BS fcadw 

5.000 WArrS-/280KC 



T Att 



EUGENE. OREGON 

WANT MORE FACTS P 

-conrAcr wsed e co. 



50 



into new markets. Buying is incomplete. Agency for the pharma- 
ceutical division since late Decemher is Wesley Associates, New 
York. Buyer: Joseph Knap. 

C & C Super Corp., New York, for its new pre-mixed liquid 
pancake hatter. Batter-Up, starts an introductory campaign next 
week for from eight to 13 weeks. Markets will include the South, 
parts of New England, upstate New York and major metropolitan 
areas. Strategy is to use participations in local personality shows, 
preferably between 7 and 8:30 a.m. and 4 and 6 p.m., with per- 
sonalities introducing the product at party-demonstrations in hotels. 
Item is distributed through local milk companies. Saturation fre- 
quencies range from a minimum of 10 to 25 weekly per station, 
with several stations per city. Buying is not complete. Agencv: 
Weiss & Geller. Buyer: Jack Geller. 



TV & RADIO BUYS 

Carter Products, New York City, launches a combination tv and 
radio schedule this week aimed at (1 i testing the relative strength 
of each medium and (2) selling a new type of laxative. Colonaid. 
A list of some 40 tv and six radio stations was selected carefully to 
balance the many elements needed in such a media test. Contracts 
continue through March, the end of Carters fiscal year, at which 
time future plans will be made. Frequencies vary according to 
market size, but are termed "reasonable." Agency : Kastor. Farrell. 
Chesley & Clifford, N. Y. Buyers: Jack Peters and Ber\l Seidenberg. 

Stanley Home Products, East Hampton. Mass.. is using spot tv 
and radio for the first time in a media test in Michigan starting later 
this month. Company sells its home products only through parties 
in private homes given by housewives for their friends and will use 
its broadcast copy to promote the hostess-party concept and to 
recruit new housewife-dealers. Radio pattern: multiple market, 
10 weeks from 14 Januarv. daytime minutes at the rate of 20 
weeklv. Tv pattern: Detroit only, five weeks from mid-February, 
12 to 14 announcements weekly. Daytime only is to be used. Results 
will determine future use of the media and possible expansion. 
Agency: Charles W. Hoyt. New York. Buyer: Douglas Humm. 

Monarch Wine Co., Inc., New York, is buying radio and t\ 
announcements nationally for a Manischewitz wine January-through- 
Easter campaign, the second phase of one which ran from October 
through Christmas. One-minute e.t.'s will be used for the daytime 
radio schedule, which is daytime: filmed minutes and 20's for 
nighttime tv. Bu\ ing is incomplete. Agencj Emil Mogul. \<u 
York. Buyer: Elaine Whalen. 

J. H. Filbert, Inc., Baltimore, is buying minutes in 35 markets 
for Mrs. Filbert's Margarine, sold exclusively on the East Coast. 
Average \\erkl\ radio frequency: 10 per station: tv. five. Most of it 
will be daytime, with some earl\ evening. Radio announcements 
will be e.t.'s: tv. live and film. Buying is half completed, \gency: 
SSC&B, New York. Buyer: Jim O'Dey. 



SPONSOR 



12 JANUARY 1957 







Ik 





1<tOH> ^/slfl€dA/ announces the 
forthcoming publication of 



WHO'S WHO 

IN WORLD TELEVISION 

Radio, Electronics 

.iinl Mlied \ii- & Industi 

* <L.cdtea bu Martin Codel and staff 

The f i i * - 1 edition i- being compiled dow. It will 
contain essential biographical reference data on 
foremosl personalities in telecasting and broadi ast« 
in:: (networks, Btations, production, advertising 
and related fields ; in rV-radio manufacture, 
suppl) and distribution; in electronics develop- 
ment anil production; in <i\il and military tele* 
communications in the I nited States, ( anada, 
Britain and the rest <»l the world. 



Listing i> 1»\ invitation and questionnaire, and 
involves no cost or obligation. Ml li-tin_- are 
subject to the approval of our Board «>l Editors. 



Published bv 




Wm 




A publication <>f Radio Newi Boreas 

WYATT BUILDING, WASHINGTON 5, D. C 



SPONSOR • 12 JAW IR1 1957 



51 



Digest of the week's developments 
in advertising and the air media 




News and Idea WRAP-UP 



ADVERTISERS 

Milner Products Co. will get it? new 

$1.5 million ad budget for '57 started 
with twin contests, one trade and one 
consumer. Contests are expected to 
spark a 45% sales increase this year. 

The company which produces house- 
hold chemicals (Pine-Sol and Perma 
Starch) is currently using network 
radio, as well as local t\ shows. The 
new ad budget represents a 50% in- 
crease over last year and is 20% of 
annual sales estimates. 

Milner Products Co. started in L948 
w hen Howard S. Cohoon and R. E. 
Dumas Milner took over a local jani- 
torial supply house and built out of it 
a million dollar business. Sales figures 
for 194S were $77,000. Wholesale sales 
for 1956 topped $5 million with an 
climated $7 million predicted for 
1957. 



Kroger Co. had to call out the 
Navy as a result of a recent pro- 
motion for its Victory at Sea film 
package. 

The compam s Indianapolis Divi- 
sion through the Ralph H. Jones Co. 
agency developed a Junior Nav) Club 
for kids ages six to 14. Youngsters in 
the Indianapolis and Terre-Haute areas 




were told to write in for \a\\ ID 
cards and authentic shoulder patches, 
third class rating. The response was 
so great that on-hand supplies were 
quickl) used. Then a distress signal 
was sent to the Navy Department in 
Washington. The Navy alerted fleet 
quartermasters — and soon the patches 
started arriving from all over the 
world. 



Even a banana can be a contro- 
versial figure. 

Florence M. Gardner, manager of 
KTFI, in Twin Falls. Idaho, banned 
the '"Banana Boat ' song on her sta- 
tion, saying that the revival of the 
1936 tune is "just too co-incidental to 
be accidental! Her charge refers to 
I nited Fruit Co."s big banana ad cam- 
paign now being run in the news- 
papers. KTFFs manager feels the 
-una revival is connected and suggests 
radio as the best means of selling 
"liananaslaniT an) way. 

C. W. Moore, ad manager of United 
Fruit. sa\s there's no connection at all 
and avows that his company also has 
nothing to do with the rumored re- 
\ ival id "1 Like Bananas Because They 
Have No Bom - 




AGENCIES 

"How to be a successful late 
starter in the highly competitive 
big time agency derby." Here's 
North \d\crtising's formula: 

The Chicago agency which has just 
celebrated its first year in business 
with a one-third growth in billings, 
points out that when it started on 1 
December 1955 it had 60 members in 
the firm and the big Toni account 
which included: Toni, Tip-Toni, 
Tonette, Silver Curl Home Permanent: 
Deep Magic and Spin Curlers. 

Within six month? the agenc\ had 
added three more accounts. Prom. 
Lanvin Parfums and Fnglander. \lso 
two new Toni products were assigned 
for development. 

North used tv heavib lit rank- L3th. 
in national billings I , 

Recently the agenc\ has been using 
network and spot radio going along 
with NBC's "imagery transfer" philos- 
ophy. 

Future plans include a network 
prestige package for Lanvin and local 
tv shows for Fnglander. North figures 
on spending at least $1,000,000 in spot 
tv this year. 

The agencv was founded 1>\ Don P. 
Nathanson. president: Cyrus H. 
Nathan, executise \.p. : and three 




AGENCIES: North observes 1st anniver- 

• H. Nathan, i xecutive v. p. and 

P. Nathanson, president, cut i ake 



RADIO STATIONS: \\ 1 1 K . Cleveland, rings 
the liell for Salvation Vrmy's Christmas 
kettle in week-long campaign f<>r funds 



TV STATIONS: King Kong looms large in 
I os \ngil<~. KHJ T\ pushes feature film 
promotion with trick photos and peanuts 






Sl'itXSOW 



12 JANUARY 195 1 




WE'RE STAKING OUT OUR RICHEST CLAIM YET 



MAXIMUM-POWER is the word! MAXIMUM- 
POWER from our half-mile high tower 
to our entire Puget Sound area . . . reaching into 
the homes of over 300,000 people who 
boast of one of the highest per-capita incomes 
in the World! (and we're not counting over 
1,000,000 of our British Columbia Cousins 
who like us the most.' ) 

We'll "Placer with Power" ... so stake your claim 
now in our entire D uget Sound Area. 

■JnfernafionaJ Surveys Inc. 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY FORJOE 



KV0SITV 







SPONSOR 



12 .i \m w:y 195. 



53 



charter officers, Bruce M. Dodge, 
George II. Gruenwald, and Harold 
Rosenzweig. 



Norman II. S. rouse, president of J. 

Waller Thuni])son Co.. sees a 50% 
increase in food product sales in the 
next eight to 1" years and that a $15 
billion advertising volume will be 
"necessary" to sell the $600 billion 
gross national product which is pre- 
dicted lor around 1965 . . . 

Fairfax M. (lone, president of Foote, 
Cone & Belding, looking into the 
future sees the introduction of a large 
number of new products this year 
ranging from toilet soaps in color to 
electronic ovens. Advertising will show 
a gain of "at least 10' < and will 
amount to more than $11 billion in 
57. Cone predicts. 



New agency appointments: Bakers 
Franchise Corp.. has appointed Emil 
Mogul Co. for Lite Diet bread. Air 
media will be used and ad expendi- 
tures are expected to reach $1 million 
for all media. . . Paul Klein Industries 
has appointed Raj mond R. Morgan 
Co. as ad agency for all Formula 42 
products . . . C&C Super Corp. has ap- 
pointed Weiss & Geller, New York, 
to handle advertising for all divisions 
. . . Noxzema has appointed Mac- 
Manus, John & Adams to handle the 
full line of Noxzema medicated shav- 
ing products. The appointment signals 
an expanded ad campaign . . . Grove 
Labs has appointed Sidney Garfield & 
Assoc, as agency for all advertising for 
NoDoz Awakeners and increased the 
ad budget. 



MrtV People 
Listen HIOW 



iyMpi 

^^ BIRMINGHAM 

THE Voice OF ALABAMA 

John Blair & Co. 



NETWORKS 

Here are highlights from the net- 
works' year-end reports: 

ABC — reports gross billings lor '56 

Id exceed S75 million in tv and radio 
making "significant gains on the road 
back. The network notes the com- 
mercial success of it's radio arm the 
past year and its "emergence to the 
number two position" in radio. ABC's 
l\ network has added nine primary af- 
filiates in 56 and points up its recently 
submitted proposal to the FCC to give 
all three webs equal access to the 
nation's top 200 markets. 

CBS — reports gross billings up 18.- 
'2' , for its tv network during the first 
10 months of '56 as compared to the 
same period in '55. The tv branch also 
had 122 sponsors in the past 12 
months. 26 of which were new to 
Columbia and 15 new to network tv 
altogether. Affiliates reached 227, 
which is greater than the all-time CBS 
Radio high. 

NBC — reports tv total dollar vol- 
ume of sales up 22% over 1955. Tv 
advertisers totaled 251 with 30 spon- 
soring regularly scheduled color 
shows. Tv affiliates reached 201. 
NBC Radio network sponsors were up 
in '56 with 74 as compared to 65 the 
previous year. The radio network has 
199 affiiliates. NBC states that its 
radio network has "enjoyed a success- 
ful year both in terms of sales and 
programing." 



Mutual is starting the New Year 



with plans for a strong offensive 
against tv — first step is new quiz 
programing idea of across-the-board 
shows. After testing the new format in 
Jamestown, New York, the quizzes will 
make their network bow looking some- 
like this: 

(1) 17 programs a week. Two 10- 
minute programs per da\. Mondav 
thru Saturday, and one 25-minute 
quiz each week-night. 

(2 1 Prize budget of $1.5 million 
which will cover everything from mink 
coats to chicken farms — cash give- 
aways arc included. 

(3) Scope — designed so anyone and 
everyone can play with entry cards 
available free of charge at stores, pub- 
lic meeting places, hotels, etc. 
Recent network sales: Benrus 
Watch has bought one-third of eight 
Caesar's Hour shows filling up the 
roster on the NBC-TV Saturday night 



program through June . . . The Paint 
Division of the Pittsburgh Plate Glass 
Co. has bought a quarter-hour of the 
CBS-TV daytime Garry Moore Slum 
on Frida\ . . . Bon Ami Co. and Per- 
kins Products, a General Foods sub- 
sidiary, have signed for segments of 
the ABC Radio morning block . . . 
Helene Curtis goes in as alternate 
sponsor on CBS TV's Gale Storm 
Show on Saturday 19 January. 

REPS 

Adam Young, president of Adam 
Young Inc., New York, reports that 
more than $500,000 in radio billing 
was turned down during 1956 by sta- 
tions on his list because of inability 
to clear time. Despite this handicap, 
Young radio billings rose 28'v over 
1955. In television, billing during 
1956 ran 38' , higher than in 1955. 
Consequently, there has been a ten- 
dency toward longer contracts to 
guarantee good time spots. 

Part of the rise in billing has been 
caused by rate increases, but as more 
markets during the past year ap- 
proached saturation, rate increases 
were fewer. In addition. Canadian 
broadcast media are slightly more 
than 20' < greater than last year, ac- 
cording to Thomas F. Malone, who 
heads up Canadian Station Representa- 
tives Ltd. (also controlled by Young'. 
Major advertisers active in the Cana- 
dian market include Sterling Drug, 
American Home Products. P & G. and 
G. T. Fulford. 

The Katz Agency has appointed Al- 
len Hundlev and Howard J. Stasen to 
its sales staffs in Dallas and Chicago, 
respectively . . . W. Donald Roberts, 
newly formed rep firm, is a departure 
in representation inasmuch as it 
handles local stations. Roberts thinks 
a rep cannot sell power on one hand 
and local stations on the other . . . 
Peters, Griffin. Woodward, Inc., 
gave its '"Colonel of the ^ ear Award" 
to John A. Corey, vice president of 
the agency's Chicago office. Ward 
singularl) honors the account execu- 
tive for outstanding achievement in 
195() in radio and tv. 



100% NEGRO PROGRAMS 



EH33 



IN NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 



54 



SPONSOR 



12 JANUARY 1957 



HOW TO FIND 
YOUR WAY AROUND 
NEW YORK & CHICAGO 




mJoxatfcyfYti/: 



* Adman's Eating Directory 
** Advertisers 

* Agencies 

-ft Air Lines and Railroads 
■X- Associations 

* Hotels 

* Networks 

■X* Researchers 
■X" Representatives 

* Services 

•X- TV Film Sources 



is ahead) m tht P 

how main important calls 

yow three days in 

the best of us, m the woi U tin 

Sext time you re u \ 
ever) minute and call count b 
sponsor i 19 >7 i><>< ket-size l> 
titled "Radio and II D Vew 

and Chicago.*' II ■ ■■ rou'll find nor 
'"/'/>• sses, ■■ ■ ■ <■■:• gorii 

i, stations, networks 
representatives, Tl film u 
iiml transcript 
airlines, railroads and restaurants. 

II ■ II />,■ glad i" send • H <//<< and I ' 

Directory on ■ with I 

rnpliments oj sponso 

SPONSOR 

THE MACAZINE RADIO AND TV ADVERTISERS 

NEW YORK 17— • 

CHICAGO— • 

LOS ANGELES — • 

P S 

in. 



TV STATIONS 

Idea at work at W USD. The Ne* 
> ork Btation is using time to sell 
time. 

Announcements during the breaks 
on t he late evening \i^lit Heat show 
.in addressed to specific timebuyers 
.ii the major agencies pointing out 
ratings and '<>st per thousand. 

So far W \H1) has plugged only it;* 
Might lit'ut and Looney Tunes shows 
but plan- t<> give other programs the 
same treatment. 

Spots are used twice each evening 
and are !0-seconds in duration. Idea 
is that of Ted Cott, v. p. and general 
manager. 

Tv applications: Between 27 Decem- 
ber and 5 January four applications 
for new Nations were filed. Applica- 
tions were made by Glendive Broad- 
< astini;. Glendive, Mont., for Channel 
5, Glendive, l.(>2 kw visual, with tower 
minus 93 feet above average terrain, 
plant $59,400. yearly operating cost 
$64,250; 1>\ Jack A.Burnett, Honolulu. 
Hawaii, for Channel 9, Odgen, Utah, 
1.71") kw visual, with tower 668 feet 
above average terrain, plant $71,812, 
\earl\ operating cost $120,000; by 
Marvin k ratter, Fargo Telecasting Co., 
New York for Channel 11. Fargo, N. 
I).. L.6 kw visual, with tower 241 feet 
above average terrain, plant $57,333, 
\cail\ operating cost $113,580; and 
by Cache Valley Broadcasting for 
Channel 12, Logan, Utah, .758 kw 
visual, with tower minus 760 feet 
above average terrain, plant $49,600, 
yearly operating cost $30,000 to 
$40,000. 

Feature film promotion is big in 
Los Angeles. KHJ-TV used trick 







\rfr^yy 


BERT 
PFL0EGGER 

PXCCMMSNDS 
THIS 
DINER 


^2m s\* l \\vr\\n 


<# m 


^%J L \\U3? 


if 


~\^^^ h 




3J 


^fc 





"Oh, him — he's the brother of a disc 
jockey on KRIZ Phoenix!" 



photograph) to show '"Kin» Kong" in 
front of each newspaper building — 
also sent a 10-pound bag of peanuts 
to t\ editors. I See first page of 
Wrap-Up) "Kong" wrapped up an 
unduplicated 79.7 Telepulse and a 
9,393,820 audience when shown in 
New York last March . . . Butternut 
Coffee drinkers sent in 415 pounds 
of coffee can key strips to KOA-TV, 
Denver, during the station's Christmas 
drive for homeless children. The coffee 
compan) put aside cash for each strip 
(there were ll').52(> of them) to buy 
presents for the kids. 

The impact of color tv was topic at 

the National Convention of Speech 
and Theatre Conference in Chicago 
last week. Speakers included Howard 
\\ . Coleman, WNBQ color sales de- 
velopment manager; Mrs. Betty Ross 
West, supervisor of public affairs and 
education at WNBQ and WMAQ and 
Elmer Nichols, advertising and pro- 
motion manager RCA Victor Distrib- 
uting Corp. 

Major points of the talks included: 

• Color has advanced as far in two 
years as b&w did in five. Using 
Chicago as an example, the city now 
has over 40 hours of color each week 
compared with no regular schedule of 
color two years ago. Two stations are 
now programing color with a third 
about to start. 

• Advertisers are becoming more 
and more aware of color. One ex- 
ample, the white appliance field has 
gone to color — even plaid. One major 
manufacturer plans for more than half 
of its refrigerator and ranges to be in 
color this year. 

RADIO STATIONS 

Go remote, young station — could 
be the advice of KYW. 

After its first year in Cleveland ra- 
dio, KYW has found there's gold in 
them thar store windows. General 
manager, Gordon Davis, is enthusias- 
tic about store and supermarket re- 
mote broadcasts and predicts, "The 
coming year will see KYW personali- 
ties more prominentU in the role of 
goodwill ambassadors throughout the 
communitj . 

The station's p. a. plan works this 
way: Store hu\s a saturation spot 
campaign which includes announce- 
ments of the appearance of a K^ \\ 



personality along with commercials on 
the store opening or special event; 
then the station merelv moves a regu- 
lar!) scheduled disc jockev show to 
the shopping center for the remote; 
the store pa\s for the campaign plus 
remote charges. 

K N \\ says it sells more air time 
with no additional cost and has made 
itself some exceptionally happy cus- 
tomers to boot. 

The ad manager of Pick-N-Pay Su- 
per Market called the remote done at 
its opening, "One of the most success- 
ful from both the standpoint of cus- 
tomer traffic and sales volume. In fact, 
several times we had to shut the doors 
because the store was jammed. " Stand- 
ard Drug and Firestone Auto Supplies 
are among other advertisers equally 
pleased. 

First remotes were done at store 
opening but the initial success of these 
ventures has brought requests for in- 
store broadcasts from firms already in 
operation. The station is operating 
its store window broadcasts on a year- 
round basis rather than just as a fair 
weather enterprise. 



\\ ICE, reports billings have gone up 
five times above July levels. The Provi- 
dence station which was purchased 
in \ugust bv Tim Elliot, tripled its 
gross October billings in the month 
of November which put it at the break- 
even point. WCL'E, Akron, another 
Elliot station, reports record billings 
for November with an increase of 
24.5% as compared to the same month 
in 1955. 



WTMJ's fish lure contest wound 
up by hooking 234 gadget entries of 
the Rube Goldberg varietv plus heavy 
mail response. The Milwaukee station 
personalities. Gordon Thomas and Bill 
Carlsen. bad solicited lures for a spon- 
sor with below par piscatorial prowess, 
and what started out as a rib wound 
up as a successful promotion gimmick. 

WHK's promotion for the Salvation 
Arm) during Christmas week along 
with the accompanying publicity 
helped push the organization's holiday 
collections in Cleveland $1300 over 



56 



SPONSOR 



12 JANUARY 1957 



tin- 1955 in. ii k .11 cording i" It. < !oL 
I dward Carey, >li\ isional < ommandei 
nl the \i my. I In- station put the ti i 
ditional Vrmy kettle in the parking 
lot, asked listeners to drive u|> i.> i Ik- 
studio dooi .mil drop In a contribu- 
tion, and auctioned <'H .1 17 Plymouth 
during the week-long drive. , . . 
I I \t -AM-FM, I ayetteville, N 1 . 
donated 210 hours "I free time foi 
Midnight to Reveille, spe< i.il publii 
service highway safety program pro 
duced l>\ the Will Virboi ne 1 orps 
Public Information Office. Program 
consisted of five weeks ol safe driving 
bints and advice during the holiday 
-■• ison. 

FILM 

I i^lu half-hour V\ film programs 
have been scheduled for the first 
half of L957 by TPA. rhis includes 
26 mitii- episodes each "f Private Sec- 
retary and Fury, I >< >t It network shows. 
I stimated budget foi seven <>f tin- 

-ln>\\- ua- SlO.."i million. 

What i- believed t<> 1><- the largest 
first-run-off network sales record was 
registered f«>r Susie, re-run title ol 



I'm try. S dea im ll 

"lull ne i" more thai 

million. 



I elefilm industry |»< | » I • - an 
watching with intercal the anti- 

IrUSt -nil filed against ih. \l M 

by Republic Productions. I li> suit 
in\ olves re-use pay ments to \l \l 

-iiiinilti.il k- nf una n- used "ii u . 
I In suit, lil>-il in I ederal < ourt in 

I lolly u I 2 l.inii.ii \ . asked treble 

damages oi 16 million. 1 ontrai It R< 
public i- seeking to break provide foi 
re-use pay ments usi- 

cian \\ iili pay ments t" the MM ti usl 
where a musician cannot be located. 

M M - I li>ll\ u I local 1- also 1 1 

tu break the trust fund formula in 

1 milt. 



I In- trend i<> t^ house packages at 
Hal Roach Studios %MII continue in 

1 «>.->:. 

rhough 1956 production figures 

- 1,867,000 foi l!"ii Ii were less than 

1955, the investment involves films in 

which Roach has .1 sole "i joint pro- 




Folks fall for WWDC 
"1st in Washington,D.C.,6A.M.to6 P.M.. 7daysaweek"-Sept.-0ct.'56 Pulse 



lirllllHtlD NATIONAllT iT JOHN HAU 1 CO"'*"' 



■lid 

I . i ii- - -.ill - \ ill ii mi ..I ill / , ^ | 

■ 1 1 \ i - 1 1 1 1 1 - 1 1 1 I ' » "» 1 1 h , - 1 1 , Itighri 
id. in tin previous r< n 

\\ In i 

in mull 

■ In-ill- • 

■ ii lion • 
Iiln 



"Mllilin I ilm- 

houi 

llnrl. I ■ I. • ! i • ■ 

Basie, Sarah \ i 

ml Hamptoi Cab ( 

Ellington, I >m » t « W 

Sterling I \ 

markets duri I '• 

cembei 

Screen Gems ien han«l 

ment, headed by I '1 lustin, < 

ild Mi B B 

'Mr M i I! in 

t with I I' \ • BS I \ whid 

\ I . I I 

ili-in- rights i" all i • 

troduced in tin- si 



RESEARCH 

I In adolescent as ■• i onsnmei 
profiled in the January issue 
i ations, psyi holoj 
published \<\ the Institute for Mot 
tional Resean h. ; 

tii-n ^iiU 

|n\ al tu r.nli" ami are !• - 
in t\ than any othei 
• i loyall 
pop music which they Ir l* 

tln-ir "\mi and the fact t 1 
inn. unlike tv, di ty 

advertisers interested 

1. The ' 

\\itli 5". 

mere hi 
out a 

! • • 
member ■>! ll ut he a - 

• njt in that i that 

plays listincthre 



SPONSOR 



12 JANUARY 1957 






liiltiKc". and "superiority" appeals to 
the teen-ager. 

3. 1'hc \oungsters take their boy- 
girl relationships seriouslj the ad ap- 
proach should, too. 

4. The teen-age bo) or girl is 
touch} and often moody, sometimes 
I < ■■ i - "ill nl 1 1 1 » • group. I lc nia) resent 
the ad approach that plays up a happy 
bunch "I youngsters. Motivations sug- 
gests occasional!) using copy tbat indi- 
cates the product will help get him on 
the inside. 

5. Recent studies -how that 16 mil- 
lion adolescents have I . S. spending 
powei "1 $9 billion, hut most advertis- 
ing tails to appeal to the teen-ager as 
an independent customer. For with 
lhi> enormous spending power the 
adolescent has a need of feeling that 
he has a free choice of how to spend 
his monev- 



TvB*s president, Norman E. Cash, 
commenting on national advertising 
expenditures for 1955 as issued by the 
Magazine Advertising Bureau, points 
out the "understandable" omission of 



spot tv figures, but also reminds MAB 
that as of the final quarter of L955, 
-pot t\ is a measured medium and 
suggests including the spot figures in 
future reports. 

Cash gives these figures for the first 
9 months of 1956: 

Spot u $289,656,000 
Network 353,961,000 



Total $643,617,000 

National magazine expenditure- foi 
the first three quarters of '56 were 
$518,600,000. 

Use of color in film commercials 
is climbing. 

More evidence from Criterion Film 
Laboratories, New 7 York. Fred Todaro, 
president, notes necessity to increase 
his plant's color facilities bv 509? al 
the end of the first seven months of 
operation. Todaro has been a color 
film expert for over 17 years. 

Criterion has also added custom de- 
signed 35 mm equipment for faster 
b&w delivery. 



STOCK MARKET 

following stocks in air media and 
related fields will he listed each issue 
with quotations for Tuesday this week 
and Tuesday the week before. Quota- 
tions supplied h\ Merrill Lynch, 
Pierce, Fenner and Beane. 





Mon.* 


Tues. 


Net 


Stock 


31 Dec. 


8 Jan. 


Change 


\ ew ) ork Sim 1. 


Exchange 




\B-1T 


24% 


■2.V', 


- % 


AT&T 


i:i :; , 


176% 


+4% 


Avco 


6 


7 


+ 1 


CBS "A" 


32% 


32% 


- % 


I olumbia Pic. 


17% 


L7% 


+ H 


Loew's 


20% 


20% 




Paramount 


28% 


29 


+ V* 


RCA 


35% 


34% 


-1% 


Store] 


25% 


26% 


+ % 


20th-Fos 


23% 


23% 




\\ arner Bros. 


28% 


28% 


- V* 


Westinghouse 


57% 


55% 


-IVs 


American Stock Exchange 




Allied Artists 


3% 


3 7 / 8 




C&C Super 


1% 


1 


- Vh 


Crowell-Collier 


5% 


7 1 - 


+1% 


DuMont Labs. 


4% 


1 T - 


+ V* 


Guild Films 


2% 


3% 


+ % 


VIA 


7% 


8% 


+ % 



*Stock exchange closed Tues., 1 Jan. 




Paul H. Raymer Co., National Representative 



58 



SPONSOR • 12 JANUARY 1957 




ATIONWIDE, PERSONALIZED SERVICE 




Blackburn-Hamilton Company literally co/ers the: nation 
ton, Chicago, Atlanta and San Francisco. 



with offices in Washing 



But this is only a part of the B-H service picture; more important than geographical con 
venience is the experience and quality of performance this pioneer brokerage house pi | 
at your disposal. Its representatives have worked in the media they represent, and they 
know their markets and the people in them. They know, too, that there are no substitutes 
for integrity and experience. 




1M 



NEGOTIATIONS 



FINANCING 



APPRAISALS 



RADIO • TELEVISION •NEWSPAPER 




-) 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 

JAMES W. BLACKBURN 

JACK V. HARVEY 

WASHINGTON BIDG. 

STERLING 3-4341.2 



o 



CHICAGO 

RAY V. HAMILTON 

TRIBUNE TOWER 
DELAWARE 7-2755.4 



o 



ATLANTA 

CLIFFORD > MARSHALL 

HEALEY BIDG 

JACKSON 5-1574-7 



o 



SAN FRANCISCO 

WILLIAM T STUBBLIFIElD 

W I TWINING 

111 SUTTIR ST. 

EXIIOOK 2.5471-2 




Day and night, seven days a week, WNHC-TV \ 



delivers more audience at lower cost than the 
next five stations reaching the area combined ! 
Nearest competitor has less than one-fourth 
the audience. Survey after survey proves 
WNHC-TV's overwhelming superiority in 
every part of Connecticut and Southern 
Massachusetts. Katz has the surveys: ARB, 
January 1956; PULSE, October 1956; NIELSEN 
NCS #2, 1956; and others. Call Katz today! 





&. 



WNHC-T 

NEW HAVEN-HARTFORD, CO 

Channel 8 

ABC-TV' CBS-TV 
Represented by KATZ 



V 



NN. 






operated by: Radio and Television Dlv. / Triangle Publications, Inc. / 46th & Market Sts., Philadelphia 39, Pa. 
■AM.FM.TV Ph i, ade , phiai Pa . /WNBF-AM . FM . TV. B i n g h a m t o n , N . Y . 
• AM> Harrisburg. Pa. /WFBG-AM.TV A | toona , Pa . /WNHC-AM . FM . TV. New Haven-Hartford, Conn. 

National Sales Office, 485 Lexington Avenue, New York 17, New York 

ESPECIfll I Y IN H ARTFORI 



' 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



12 January Tin- first Mil reeking to change ihe rule* •• " mult ipl«*-*tnt ion ihip 

spohso^ubuc^ns.nc. '- been Introduced fa gresa. 

Coming from Ri h O'Hara R., M i , the bill pi t no person 01 

company maj own Interests In iv Btationi serving nun. than ' • ol ll 
population a 

Meanwhile, the I < < i- < • • 1 1 -■ » . i « i ii 
rules (which limit ownership to 5 vhf and 2 uh 
the quota i . 

The appeals court recentl) upheld the Comn iuthorih 

the Storex case, which bad been I I from the U. S. 5 ' irt. 



The Senate Commerce Committee plans to have the l<< commissioners <\ 
plain before the end of January what thej have been doing about getting more t\ 

stations on the air. 

Members of the committee public] 
mi-sion's slowness to move. 

\t the last such meeting, FCI < hairman Md 
posals to shift all oi a major part of t\ to ulif chani 
a "crash" program of research aimed at helping uhi I ! ^ with vbf. 

Critical committee members feel that afi< i 
done. 



The Evina Report, first issued as a one-man document last October, was final- 
ly approved 1>> the si\ Democrats on t !■ «- Hon-, Small Business < ommitt 

It bad to be toned down considerably, with much of the - rnan 

McConnaughey removed, and all the comments iboul FO I 
before it could be adopted. 

(Even so, the five Republicans on the comn 
termed what tli<' Democrats had t purel) politi 

The majority report still charged the I ' I - failing 
the communications field and standing idly ' while uhf - 

Uso, it still called lor independence from the Whit. 
as the FCC and FTC) and the selection of their chairmen b) i 



Reports of the Senate Commerce Committee and Hon-. Judicial-] antitrust 
subcommittee are going t<» be delayed. 

The House subcoiimmtee- I 
record of its network t\ 

been set for the report. 

The Senate group apparently wont ' document I 

March. 

,«-- 61 

SPONSOR • 12 JANUARY 19n , 




WHICH TRADE PAPER 

MAKES MOST DOLLARS AND SENSE 

FOR STATION ADVERTISING ? 







I ime was when tv and radio station advertising frequently ivas 
parcelled out on a "I like Norm" basis. 
But were happy to report that times have changed. Today practically 
every national station campaign is weighed and placed on one practical 
basis: how can I get the top return for my advertising dollars? 
This positive approach to trade paper selection by broadcast station 
executives is essential today. Even the most successful station man- 
ager must exercise the keenest judgment in every facet of his operation 
or he will find himself losing ground not only to the competition but 
in the daily battle of expense vs. income. 

Sponsor welcomes your close, careful, and scientific evaluation of 
the trade publications of our field as you make your 1957 decision — 
and presents these pertinent facts: 

1. SPONSOR is well-launched as a weekly. This is an under- 
statement; it has created a wave of excitement and enthusiasm 
without parallel in our field. It's remodeled from stem to stern 
for fast, easy, must reading by busy executives. It combines use 
articles with use news in newsletter style to create a brand new 
magazine concept. It's designed not only for timebuyers but for 
top decision-makers throughout the client firm and agency who 
like the idea of one magazine that guarantees to keep them posted. 

2. SPONSOR is pinpointed 100% at your clients and pros- 
pects. Your ad message hits the mark in Sponsor because every 
word is written to benefit "the man who foots the bills." Unlike 
other publications, every tv and radio station advertising message 
in Sponsor is adjacent to editorial content of interest to buyers. 

3. SPONSOR'S circulation is tailor-made for your purposes. 

Not only is its agency /advertiser circulation of over 7,000 the 
largest in the field, but a higher percentage of its copies go to 
buyers (nearly 7 out of every 10 copies). And the impact of the 
BPA-audited weekly is attracting new top-level readers. 

4. SPONSOR is preferred by busy buyers. All impartial reader- 
ship studies of agency /advertiser trade paper reading tell the 
same story. We know of no independent survey along these lines 
made since 1955 that shows Sponsor anywhere but in first place. 

5. SPONSOR has multiple subscribers at key buying firms. 

During 1956, Sponsor averaged 20 paid subscriptions (at its 
price of $8 per year) at each of the 40 top spot-buying agencies; 






numerous subscribers al air-minded sponsor firms. \t Y&R, 
BBDO, M-E, JWT, Bates, B&B, Burnett and others of like 
parlance Sponsoh goes to 30 to 70 subscribers each. 

6. SPONSOR commands reaped for yonr a<! message. Why? 

Because Sponsoh is a prestige publication. Sponsor makes news. 
For example, within the fir>t s« weeks after going weekly Sponsoh 
was quoted in Charles Mercer's VP column (1,000 papers), Dirk 
Kleiner's M ■' \ feature ^ ry (400 papers), Jack O'Brian's INS 
column, John Crosby's syndicated column, Leonard Lyons' syn- 
dicated column. Hal Humphrey's syndicated column, the Wall 
Street Journal. It was prominently mentioned in Walter Winchell's 
column (1.200 paper?) Oct. 18, Nov. 21 an.l 28, Dec 
Sponsor's publisher was interviewed 1>\ Vrlene Francis <>n the 
\BC-TV Home Sho\* and by Tex and Jinx on NBC Radio. 

7. SPONSOR is a crusader. For 10 years SPONSOR has fought 
hard for worthwhile industry improvements, projects, and reform-. 

Boh SarnofT. president of NBC. recently said, "Sponsor has never 
heen reluctant to take a stand on things it believed to be in the 
best interests of television and radio. It is this attitude, together 
with the magazine's impartiality and thoroughness, which has won 
for it the respect of the entire broadcasting industry." 

8. SPONSOR interprets the tv/radio advertising scene. Only 
"the magazine tv and radio advertisers use?* trains it- guns 

-quarely on the buyer's end of the business. Tom O'Neil, presi- 
dent of RKO Teleradio. wrote: "To me, one of the mo=t valuable 
ingredients of Sponsor is it- perspective.'' 

9. SPONSOR is a favorite with national station representa- 
tives. They like it because it back- them up, pinpoint- the stations 
they sell in a maze of 3,500 call letters. They like it because it's 
the heart of the dollars-and-cents side of the business, because the] 
know it's thoroughly read and used. 

10. SPONSOR rates are surprisingly low. Sponsor advertising 

rates are still pegged at 8.000 circulation figure-. Circulation 
today i- well over 12,000 (press-run 13.500 as of December 
1956) and rapidly climbing. Since 1950 SPONSOR has had only 
one rate increase. Your contract will be protected al current rat 

This is Sponsor — exciting, lively, interpretive, pinpointed, useful; a 
prestige trade publication edited for agency and advertiser reade- 
the leader in its field. Does it deserve top billing in your 1957 adver- 
tising campaign? We hope the foregoing helps you decide. 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 





SPON 



ON YOUR 

DESK 

EVERY 

FRIDAY 






A roundup of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



12 JANUARY Viewers of I Love Lucy will get a peep at the exurban life of the Madison 

sponsorpTbucatTons .nc. Avenue gentry next season. 

Plans are afoot to set the background of the show in Westport, Conn., for several weeks. 

Add this to the dossier of headaches brought on by alternate sponsorship: 

A partner in a New York agency had obtained his client's consent to revamp the con- 
tent of a program on NBC. Striking while the iron was hot, he then flew to the Coast to 
talk to the alternate sponsor — figuring he would get an automatic OK on the proposed 
improvement. 

But here's what the other fellow said: "You know my agency is in Chicago. Anything 
I do will have to start out there first." 

(See article on the complications of alternate sponsorship, page 23.) 

Thumbnail version of the dialogue that l>lew a better-than-$10-miltion account out of 

an agency a few Aveeks ago: 

Ad Manager: "We'd like to have you handle a new product of ours." 

Agency President: "We'd rather not; we think we have enough new products of 

yours." 

Ad Manager: "Then perhaps you'd rather not handle our account at all." 
Agency President: "Perhaps we wouldn't — if you put it that way." 

As you muse over the «jj>500-$600 million that national radio and tv spot 
grossed last year, you become impressed by the consistent profitability and dura- 
bility of the medium. Right from the early days of the air media, spot buyers have al- 
ways had a huge appetite and bought with relish. 

Even today, the industry fondly remembers such pioneers as: 

Chevrolet: Its quarter-hour transcribed Chevrolet Chronicles (musical) were broad- 
cost over 175 stations thrice weekly— at a time Avhen the maximum network hookup con- 
sisted of 55 stations. Arthur Hull Hayes, now CBS Radio president, was then with Camp- 
bell-Ewald as radio director. 

Beech-Nut Packing Co.: Chandu, the Magician, was recorded and spotted on 130 
stations from coast-to-coast, and became famed not only for its sustained popularity but as 
"the" innovator of program merchandising. McCann-Erickson was the agency. 

McAleer Manufacturing Co.: Preceded Amos V Andy with its recorded team of 
blackface comedians, Mack and Leer (Phil Cook was one of them). Used 80 stations. 

Iodent Company: Introduced the first team of sleuths on the air — Detectives Black 
and Blue — via weekly transcriptions on 60-odd stations. 

General Mills: Brought Skippy to the air in a transcribed version; six quarter hours 
a week. 

Mantle Lamp Company: Its recorded campaign of hillbilly music became a stalwart 
for rural stations throughout the country. 

Fels Naptha Soap: The first widely distributed product to buy live shows on local 
stations. Hubbell Robinson, Jr., now a CBS TV executive v.p., did the time and talent 
buving for Young & Rubicam. 

Esso: A pioneer of five minutes of new- three times a day. 

Rulova: Developed the time signal into a valuable item. 



64 



SPONSOR • 12 JANUARY 1957 




FIRST in audience appeal ... rated top syndicated film in Portland (31.7 i tnd - 

Diego ( 2 7 . 1 ; : ) . FIRST in time period in San Francisco (13.0 

Seattle I 15.7" I, Kalamazoo I L5.S >, Wichita (52.7 i and St.] si 18.2 I. 




FIRST in excitement, presenting thrilling 
"Front Page" dramas based on actual 
police cases taken from the files "t world- 
famous Sheriff Eugene W. Biscailuz, of 
Los Angeles County . . . 



FIRST to di ttize the person ilii 

of 1 nt officers in ai tion, with 

thrilling stories of arson, aii mountain 

tes, murder, robbery, juvenile crime S 
ring case histories to build audiences of all 



FIRST with I 

inn headline news in sales 

Miller F!r> rw ing, \ itioi 

1 




FIRST in sales results . . . testimoni 
als pouring in . . . renewals montbi 
in advance . . . excitement ami rec 
ognition for you and your product 



Wouldn't i 01 lik-- to be FIRST in rout market.' 
I. t-t i . . signal for flashing light- and 

screaming sirens, .be your signal for action. 
Write, aire, phone for complete details. 




••ASS 



ABC FILM SYNDICATION, Inc 

lO East 44th St., New York City, Oxford 7-58BO 



SPONSOR • 12 JANUARY 1957 



65 



ALTERNATE SPONSORS 

(Continued from page 25) 

Another important issue that arises 
in connection with the alternate week 
show is the matter of station lineups. 
Obviously, two sponsors will not al- 
ways want the same lineups. 

How is the prohlem solved? At the 
outset it should be pointed out that 
the problem doesn't always come up. 
In many cases, each alternate sponsor 
wants as main markets as can be 
cleared. 

\\ here a sponsor buys into a show, it 
is the usual practice for him to accept 
the lineup as is, at least for the dura- 
tion of the season even if he doesn't 
want all the markets. Where sponsors 
are on a more equal plane, the sponsor 
who wants more markets may take 
those markets his alternate doesn't 
want on an every-week basis. There 
have even been occasions where a mar- 
ket an alternate sponsor doesn't want 
is sold on alternate weeks locally by 
the station. 

Where the program is live and the 
markets in question are interconnected, 
the problem gets somewhat complicated 



since the unwanted market can only 
be fed through a central originating 
point. In the case of a film show, as- 
Miming one sponsor is willing to take 
an unwanted market both weeks, he 
can run the film locaLVj with his com- 
mercials. In a non-connected market, 
the same thing can be done with a 
kine of a live show. 

There have been instances where the 
client who wanted a longer station 
lineup has been successful in convinc- 
ing the other sponsor to go along. A 
case in point is the Godfrey Talent 
Scouts show on which Lipton (tea and 
-mui)) has been a long-time sponsor. 
Two years ago Toni bought into the 
show after Lipton had been in for six 
years. Since tea and soup are not big 
sellers in the south. Talent Scouts did 
not have extensive coverage there. But 
the south was a good market for home 
permanents and Toni. the junior spon- 
sor, asked Lipton to go along on a 
bigger lineup. Lipton finally did. add- 
ing about 40 stations. The total in- 
crease in coverage was not great (Niel- 
sen figures showed it jumped from 87 
to 94% of U.S. tv homes between 1953 
and 1956) but the examples illustrate 



dUbA, PROVIDENCE y 



is now a strong 




in the 
afternoons 



is now a strong 
contender for 




mornings 



*HOOPER shows it, WICE is the hottest buy in Provi- 
dence. In two months WICE moved from sixth place to 
a challenging third, and is moving up fast. Check 
WICE before you buy! 



■ «: e--i290 on your radio 
Providence, Rhode Island 

affiliated with WCUE, Akron, Ohio. 

TIM ELLIOT, President Notional Rep. The John E. Pearson Co. 

Exclusive Community Club Awards Station in Providence 



that the lineup issue is susceptible to 
negotiation. 

\\ hile not stricth an instance of an 
alternate sponsorship, P&G's daytime 
program, Guiding Light (shared by 
^ &R and Compton with the latter pro- 
ducing I , provides an interesting exam- 
ple of lineup accomodation were one 
advertiser is involved. 

Among Compton's products on tin 
show is Duz, which is not interested in 
west coast coverage. Cheer commer- 
cials are inserted instead and fed out 
of Chicago. Since there are a lot of 
markets between Chicago and the wesl 
coast that Duz is interested in. Duz 
commercials are cut-in locally in those 
markets. 

While often put in the categorv of 
an afterthought, program promotion 
and publicity is an intrinsic part of 
programing. It is easy to see why 
this area is often overlooked. A spon- 
sor has to have a show; he has to have 
commercials: he has to have a station 
lineup: but he doesn't have to have 
program promotion. And there are 
clients who feel that it is the networks 
job anyway. Consequently, there are 
probably more differences of opinion 
about whether or not to have such 
promotion than there are about any 
other aspect of network tv programing. 

It sometimes happens that if one 
sponsor wants to pay for program pro- 
motion and the other doesn't, the form- 
er will rather not do any than feel he 
has to bear the burden for the other 
guy. Usually, however, if the client 
and agency feel it is essential, they 
will go ahead no matter what the other 
client does. In carrying on program 
promotion in such cases, the active 
sponsor will often try to leave the im- 
pression that the program is sponsored 
by himself alone. 

W here two sponsors publicize a net- 
work show, coordination can become 
a man-sized problem. It is important 
that there be no duplication. There 
have been cases where one sponsor 
agrees to take on the job of day-to-day 
promotion while the other does special 
promotions of a long-range nature. 

Since there are cases where both 
clients hire outside organizations for 
promotion, this means that five groups 
have to be coordinated: the network, 
both agencies and both promotion 
houses. Meetings among all five are, 
therefore, a necessity and there is 
usuallv one person appointed to over- 
see the whole job as well as the prob- 



66 



SPONSOR 



12 JANUARY 1957 






lem "I making ~m e thai the promotion 

effoi t i- i .11 i i>il <>n .i« rlli. null. 

possible. 

I In- I. n k mI a partei n in agem j 
operation on alternate week Bhowa i- 
tinw here bo <\ ident .i~ ii is in regard 
tn on tin- -i ene sei \ ii ing oi .i -Inns . 
Where one agenc) is clearh established 
.1- produce] . then thai agenc) baa pi i 
aonnel riding herd on the show even 
week. Where both agencies are pro 
during agencies, the) ma) split ovei 
seeing i bores >l • il I, so thai eai Ii agen- 
cy handles production onl) during the 
week ii is the majoi advertiser, oi 
the> may both be on hand ever) week. 
Willi ,i new, live show or, with an) 
live show that has bugs in it, ii i« likel) 
thai ln'tli agencies will have people 
watching the show closel) ever) week. 
I mi example, during the short life oi 
the W alter \\ inchell Bhow, North's 
New ^ ork office chiel Bruce Dodge and 
L&N's radio-t\ boss, N i< k Keesely, 
were both .it the studio ever) week. 
When suggestions were made ti> Win- 
chell. the suggestions were a joinl .it 
fair mi matter which client was the 
majoi advertise! that week. 

I hi- kind nf cooperation is not un- 
u-ii.il l>\ ,in\ means, but neither is it 
universal. Some agenc) partners bud 
the) get along better if the) keep out 
of each other's \\.i\ when it comes to 
show servicing. 

Not thai the) ran keep out of ea< h 
other's wa) foi long. There are just 
too mam problems thai come up. For 
instance: 

\\ hat should sharing agencies do 
when one oi them loses a commercial 
through some network interruption, 
preemption or other cause? I sually, 
the network will not handle the -iiu.i- 
tinu when there are alternate sponsors 
involved. the two agencies on the 
Phil Silvers Show, Maury, Lee and 
Marshal] for Vmana and Est) for R. 
J. Reynolds, made an agreement cover- 
ing the loss of hitchhikes I the "minor" 
commercial). It provided that who- 
ever was the major sponsor the week 
the hitchhike \\a- lost would reimburse 
the other at the major sponsor's di* 
count rate. In other words, if an 
Vmana commercial was lost, the client 
would be reimbursed at K. J. Reynolds' 
discount rate. \ml vice versa. This 
means, in effect, that Vmana would be 
reimbursed less money than Reynolds 
because the latter has a higher dis- 
count 

The discount has special rele\ ance 



to alti 1 1. tti w< • k advi 
il il:. | |i | 

a different .Ii ml poli< j on 

week advert is< 

\l!< whii h uses the p< 
houi -rati 

vertisers half the di» ounl 
week clients. II" 
sponsors two shows on 
week basis, h 
week client il be is the n 
"ii different wet I 

i BS pro\ ides no dis< ounts .ii all 
alternate week advertisers but, lik<- 
\ I'.i i mits clients on two oi more 
.iliii n it.- weeks shows i" benefit I 
the dis( miiii schedule foi "<k 

advert isei - CBS uses the si ttion-hour 
disi ounl method. 

M'.i lik. \l!< uses tin :■• n "iit-.'f- 
iIh- limn -i .ii. -\-ii-in and gives ilt"< 
n. ih- i lients the dia ountt 

every-week advertisers However, pro- 
shares on Ml' 1 1 1 • a — t be on foi i 
full-year while on \l>< and < l! v the 
minimum is 26 weeks I thai is, I '■ 
alternate weeks of majoi sponsorsh 






* ith 
Whili 

I In- film d 

dill ii 

with / 
total "f 
the 

known 

I (dm show - 

Ii -- 

ma) I"- in the 

Bui ih" need f< -tioti 



u 



SOUND -FACTOR" 

Jw/f reto if n a //<> Jn wml 
frif/t 

WSRS 



ON 

GREATER CLEVELAND'S 

NUMBER, 1 STATION 



SOUND f ACTOt DISCOUNT PATAIlf ONIT 

TO lECOONirtD ADVtrriSINO aginois 

IT WSIS INC Clfvf.AND II. OHIO 



SPONs.u; 



12 JANUARY 1957 



67 



YOU'LL SELL 
MORE ON 
CHANNEL 4 

in the El Paso 
Southwest! 



I 



• KROD-TV dominates El Paso 
County* 

• KROD-TV is the only station 
to reach Alamogordo (set 

penetration 80%) and Sil- 
ver City (61). 

• 98% reported Excellent or 
good reception for KROD- 
TV in Las Cruces (81.3 
penetration) while only 10% 
reported the same for sta- 
tion "B" 

•March 1956. Telepulse and Telepulse on 
set owneishlp. 



KROD-TV 

CHANNEL 4 ^^ 

EL PASO TEXAS ft 

CBS • ABC 




AFFILIATED with KROD-600 kc (5000w ) f 
Owned & Operated by El Paso Times, Inc 



Rep. Nationally by the BRANHAM COMPANY 





KM6 



SHOULD K 
FUTURE! 



This popv lar 

s+Mten cover* 
TULSA m<S ALL 
OKLAROMAU 

ASK YOUR BLAIR MAN ABOUT.. ... 

^COVERAGE * RATINGS 

A PERSONALITIES * md RATES 



KM6 



50,000 WATTS I 
. TULSA ^ 



740 KG in 
OKLAHOMA 



THE GREAT IfsJDE PENJ DENT 
OP THE SOUTHWEST"! 



, 










Reps at work 




Walt Dunn, H-R Representatives, Inc.. New York, thinks that there 
aren't enough surveys in radio and. "'what is even worse, these 
surveys are often conducted by people who think in terms of print. 
In black and white days," Walt says, "they checked circulation by 
parking outside the newspaper plants and timing how long the 

presses ran. Everyone knew the 

presses' capacity per hour, so the\ 
multiplied capacity by run. The) 
couldn't miss! Many survey people 
have never learned that radio is 
different. They don't know that 
wherever there's a set there's a 
'press,' and sets are everywhere. 
Every home can go to 'press,' in- 
stantly, without 'make up' upstairs 
and down, in cellar and workshop. 
and cars, stores and taverns. You 
can't measure all that radio b\ 
clocking outside 01 inside, foi thai matter. Supppse thej don't 'go 
to press' during a circulation survey. That doesn't mean that the 
2-plus station loses all its audience, or radio sets-in-use in the 
market drop to zero. Yet this is what happens with all samples 
when techniques originally developed to measure the print media. 
with its physical limitations, are applied to limitless radio.'' 



Ken Goldblatt, Forjoe, New York, thinks that agencies and adver- 
tisers should appeal to special groups to create an additional demand 
for their products in this period of fierce competition. "The Negro 
radio markets, after many years, have finally been recognized as a 
tremendous untapped area for selling,'" Ken says. "But overlooked 

have been the radio stations which 
feature foreign-language and/or 
English-language programs with a 
foreign flavor. This is a major 
market, with a potential audience 
of over 10.000.000 foreign-born 
concentrated mainly in Detroit, 
Buffalo. Chicago, Los Angeles and 
Milwaukee. These people have a 
preference for the language and/ 
or humor, personalities and music 
of their national origin; their chil- 
dren often share similar tastes in 
music, such as German waltzes and Polish polkas. Advertisers are 
not establishing a common ground with this group. The few national 
advertisers using this specialized radio have secured excellent results; 
the rates are low and the competition is small. Ratings should he 
disregarded for the number of listeners has not been accurately 
measured against the total foreign-born population in a market.' 




68 



SPONSOR 



12 JANUARY 1957 




KSTP-TV hits nine out of ten ! 



Of the ten top-rated * syndicated film shows 
during the peak evening hours in the North 
market, nine are on KSTP-TV! 

These shows . . . "Highway Patrol," "Mr. D. 
A.," "City Detective," "Federal Men," "Studio 
57," "Dr. Hudson's Secret Journal." "I Led 3 
Lives." "Celebrity Playhouse." and "Stage 7" 
attract an unmatched audience— move merchan- 
dise for sponsors and participating advertisers. 



Nine out of ten is a pretty f ail in any 

nd it'a typical of KSTP-TV . . . the 
first television st ition in this vital marki 
688,558 TV familii 

For information on the few remaining cl 
availabilities, con! id i KSTP-TV reprea I 
tivr. or your ne iresl Pet 

*ARB Mi ■'tipolitan A- 



CHANNEL 
100,000 WATTS 




MINNEAPOLIS • ST. PAUL Bask NBC Affiliate 

Represented by Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 



SPONSOK 



12 JANUARY 195' 






SPONSOR 



An appreciation of radio in 1957 

We note with considerable interest and pleasure that some 
of the large advertising agencies have lately taken to adding 
radio specialists to their staffs. 

If we find any fault with this evolution it's only that not 
enough agencies are doing it. Despite the fact that 1957 
loom> as radio's biggest year, too many advertisers and agen- 
cies who should know better are still unaware of the value 
of the big job to be done with this impact, low-cost medium. 

Undoubtedly some of the blame for this tardy recognition 
lies with broadcast sellers themselves, although we're in- 
clined to believe that station reps, the RAB, the radio net- 
works, and individual stations are doing the best selling 
job ever. 

If you still think of radio as a secondary medium, we 
recommend that you start 1957 right by reevaluating the 
evidence. The RAB will help you document it, as will any 
station rep and most of your own timebuying staff, sponsor 
is ready and eager to help you in the analysis process, too. 
You'll find this fact-finding profitable. 

WGN and the code 

If further proof were needed that the NARTB code can 
work to the advantage of listeners and advertisers alike. 
Ward Quaal, general manager of Chicago's WGN and WGN- 
TV, has it. 

As Quaal puts it. "we already are demonstrating that we 
can live better by the code than we did without it. Not only 
does WGN sound better, WGN-TV look better, but the reve- 
nue of these stations is above that of a year ago." 

Compliance with the code was one of Quaal's first acts 
since returning to WGN (he had left the Nation in 1949). 

Nothing is more important to the sound health and con- 
tinuing growth of the industry than the self-regulatory pro- 
visions of the code formulated by the National Association 
of Radio and Television Broadcasters. 



THIS WE FIGHT FOR /" up-to-date, all- 
industry tr set count is .still in the making. The 
need is urgent. Agencies and advertisers are 
struggling along on obsolete data. We need a 
count with automatic escalator provision — now! 













lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Pig-in-poke: A girl timebuyer got a 

Christmas «ift which by its shape and 
heft was obviously a box of candy. 
Being on a diet, she passed it along 
unopened to a friend who was spend- 
ing his holiday with relatives in Con- 
necticut. "Take it along for your little 
nieces, she said. "Fine," he said, and 
did. When gifts were opened on 
Christmas morning his status in the 
family circle dived, while the lives of 
his little nieces were considerably en- 
riched by an assortment of cocktail 
napkins imprinted with spicy gags. 

Namesake: Because her parents. Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward Big named her 
"Kay" after KBIC I Catalina. Cab), 
the 6 lh.-7 oz. newlyborn received 
from station staff a transistor pocket 
radio. For the pocket in those three- 
cornered pants, no doubt. 

First: According to Henry Gipson's 
"Films in Business and Industry.'" first 
sponsored movies were shown out- 
doors in New York's Herald Square 
in 1897. Co-sponsors were Haig \ 
Haig, Milwaukee Beer and Maillard's 
Chocolates. It ran for three nights. 
And doubtlessly used up the entire 
I it a graph film library through 1896. 

Harmony: Max or Joe Greco, of Napa, 
Cab. is one-fourth of a barbershop 
quartet that does the singing station 
breaks for KVON. Wonder what hap- 
pens about equal time for opposition 
candidates in election years? 

Switch: The outlook for tv commer- 
cials in 29 December SPONSOR stated: 
"In 1957 you can look forward to 
more diversified casting, with empha- 
sis on interesting people rather than 
smiling faces." Does this mean neu 
casting requirements will include I' I I 
membership and a public library card? 

Pop: Audience Research survey for 
Father's Day Council showed that 
three-fourths of all Fathers Daj liitt- 
are bought by women and average 
expenditure is $10. Okay, how much 
of that $10 is out of Pops pocket? 

Spec: \ news item sa\s the duodenal 
ulcer will be studied on 12 January 
w lien ABC TV's Medical Horizons will 
take viewers to the Mayo Clinic in 
Rochester. Admen with ulcers they 
would like to see televised should 
apply in person. 



SPONSOR 



12 JANUARY L957 



Look at 
these results 



®@sw\ 




OVERWHELMS OPPOSITION . . . BRINGS NEW 
NATIONAL ADVERTISERS TO KTVX, TULSA! 




TVV> 



V »«° 



na«»« co. 



I ee 



«nber 



\U, 



19*° 






« h, crv»^ ^Vb Tor *« ^ Oil** *<£« "period 

° ear d oes * I^^SrtSjS B-^3^-°° * 

where „„« st^ii^- 

<w.ation_E. 



S. aft *.> 

Frt 



■fftV 

ll».^% 



™ e ln * h 6 Vrt« red /establi^e/ cc*P« ^ 

_ tre ng^ B * ♦ long- e5V -eri-od. lt was an f the 

f S »e»^? this t»« p 6 ^ . . , none*- ** &*«£•£. - 



itre °f agatnst lo«S-«£ e period. lt va* ^ of the 

t *£ ted ^ ** 9 ** _ purchased -W. - the ^ „*,!•. 

al« a * s „. when 1 ^ r f 0U r d»^ s * c0 t*e rcv * 



oof •' «" -?S» *- & "?- " - ^ 



G* ** f Rector 



In 1 market 

or 200, on a spot 

or program basis these 

high rated hits can 

sell your 

product! 



Call or wire today 

a.ap 

Associated Artists I Prod), 




345 Madison Ave , N Y C 

MUrroyH>ll 6-2323 

actions. Inc. 



CHICAOO 

75 E. Wicker Driv« • OEjrtXjrn 2-4040 



DALLAS 

1511 Br»»n Slrett • UtrtfVde 



LOS AN OK LI S 
9110 S**«t te » tni r « 



•••'•*■ I HI 




t 



WKNB-TV becomes 





( 



A 



A basic affiliate of NBC since October, 1955, WKNB-TV has 
parlayed its network program lineup, local shows, top caliber 
news and public service features, NBC Spectaculars and spe- 
cial events into ratings that have made it the best advertising 
bet in the whole Connecticut Valley. Beginning January 14, as 
NBC-owned WNBC - NBC-TV in Southern New England - 
Channel 30 will stand, more than ever, as the outstanding buy 
for advertisers who want to sell in this rich industrial-agricul- 
tural area. 

Blanketing four populous Connecticut counties plus a good 
part of a fifth, WNBC's signal will also cover Hampden and 
Hampshire Counties in neighboring Massachusetts. Total: 
428,500 homes; 365,370 TV homes, 91.6% UHF-converted! 
Here's a market with a population of lVfc millions, an Effective 



Buying Income of close to 3 billions, and an annual retail s « 
figure of nearly 2 billions! 

The same management that has made WKNB-TV so dyn.iic 
a factor in local business and civic affairs will remain ai he 
helm. Add the resources, experience, and marketing knowl g« 
of the National Broadcasting Company to the enviable m 
record already established by this station, and it's easy t>« 
why now, more than ever, the way to reach this prospe J* 
fast-growing market is . . . 

wnbc 30 

HARTFORD-NEW BRITAIN now sold by I NBtl SPOT SALES 







1* Jan *«v i «B7 
40« • M«ry • f 10 • 



* 



PON 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



( lad to hear they have 

i Storz Station there. 

flakes buying that much simpler. 





i 



ny of these 5 important markets . . . 

talk to the big audiences with the "Storz Station!" 



IMEAPOLIS ST. PAUL 



with WDCY 



pry nearly unanimous. Hooper, Niel- 

.fnlsc and a host of Twin Cities adver- 

agree: WDGY has the bis audience 

me bis results! See JOHN BLAIR or 

Si' GM STEVE LABUXSKI. 

HA with KOWH. \,.\v in it. sixth 

■t first place dominance. First on laf si 
t, Puis,' and Trendex, in all time periods. 
• ADAM YOUNG INC or KOWH Gen- 
Lanager VIRGIL SHARPE. 

•AS CITY . . . with WHB. First per 
r, first per Area Nielsen, first per Area 
si per Metro Pulse. 87^5 renewal rate 
Kansas City's biggest advertisers pr 



dynamic sjii,^ powei S JOHN BLAIR • 

WHB GM GE( iRGE W ARMSTRi ,N -' 

NEW ORLEANS . . . with WTIX. Month 

month WTIX maintains 

place position in New < Orleans list 

by a \\i«l<' margin, 

wait 'til von s.v that newest Puis 

Young [nc.or WTIX GM FKF.lt BERTHEL 

MIAMI . . . with WQAM. It s li 
With Si Station" programming Wl 

has leaped to first in the morning 

share 
and all day on latesl Hooper. 
Southern Florida with 5 

JOHN BLAIR or WQAM GM JACK 
SANDLER 




TODD STORZ, 

President 



NESTLES PLAN 
FOR MAXIMUM 
TV CIRCULATION 

N- -tli- «\|.ind- il- l\ 

uUtion b) 

»i\ shov 

\\r< ■'■ void- l 

full-; -hip 

Page 23 



How to launch 
a spot radio 
campaign— fast! 

Page 26 

The art of 
casting for tv 
commercials 

Page 29 

Monthly cost 
and programing 
Comparagraph 

Page 35 




%I^ 



CURLY FOX AND TEXAS RUBY 



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Ajl I 


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A N C H O 




''Happy Home Folks" Serve It Texas Style on KPRC-TV HoustOj 



H, 



Louston Gulf Coast viewers like folk music best 
when it's seasoned with a Southwestern flavor and served 
by popular local personalities. If ratings and results are 
measures of effectiveness. Curly Fox and Miss Texas 
Ruby have unsurpassed ability to entertain and sell 
(3.8 Nielsen Rating.Nov. \56,1 - 1:30 p.m.). Their live, 
across-the-board half-hour show. "Happy Home Folks," 
is loaded with top talent who tell your story and sell 
your product in a warm, friendly, convincing manner. 
Do your clients sales curve a big favor by getting avail- 
abilities right away. 



KPRC-TV 

HOUSTON 

CHANNEL 2 



JACK HARRIS 

Vice President and General Manager 

JACK MCGREW 

National Sales Manager 
Nationally Represented by 

EDWARD PETRY & CO. 



KPRC-TV 



IOST POTENT ADVERTISING FORCE IN THE HOUSTON MARKET 




BOLLING CO. 
NEW YORK 

CHICAGO 
BOSTON 
SAN FRANCISCO 
LOS ANGELES 



TERRE HAUTE, INDIANA 



CBS, NBC, and ABC Television Networks 






SPONSOR • 19 JANUARY 195 ', 



19 January 1957 • Vol. 11, No. 3 

SPONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 



IVestle's maximum-viewer plan 

23 Nestle's diversification in network tv programing ups audience poten- 
tial by 20%, typifies a new approach for multi-product television buys 

How to buy spot radio — fast 

26 Organization is basic requirement, both for agency before buying and for 
rep after. Outlined are shortest steps to launching emergency campaign 

The art of casting for tv commercials 

29 Miscast commercials can flop with as loud a thud as miscast shows. Here 
are tips on getting the right talent to make your sales message a hit 

This we fight for 

32 sponsor's 1957 editorial platform, setting on the record those industry 
causes for which sponsor will campaign during the course of this year 

Monthly tv cost and programing Comparagraph 

35 Features include average costs by network program types; cost-per-1000 
for top 10 nighttime and daytime network show r s; spot television basics 



FEATURES 

16 Agency Ad Libs 

20 19th and Madison 

56 Mr. Sponsor 

60 New and Renew 

66 \i'». & Idea Wrap-Up 

7 Newsmaker of the Week 

86 Reps at Work 

54 Sponsor Asks 



80 Sponsor Hears 
9 Sponsor-Scope 
88 Sponsor Speaks 
62 Spot Buys 
88 Ten Second Spots 
14 Timebuyers at Work 
84 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 
7T Washington Week 



In Next Week's Issue 



How Y&R buys media 

A profile of the number one tv/radio agency's all-media buyers in action, 
including a report on a new technique for speeding up spot buying 

Spot tv's role in expanding distribution 

i- on the march ai ross the nation to expand its distribution. 
n helps the company establish new beachheads 



Editor and President 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

Vice-President-General Manager 

Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 

Executive Editor 

Miles David 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Senior Editors 

Alfred J. Jaffe 
Evelyn Konrad 
Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Assistant Editors 

Joan W. Holland 
Jack Lindrup 
Betty Van Arsdel 

Contributing Editors 

Bob Foreman 
Joe Csida 

Art Editor 

Phil Franznick 

Production Editor 

Erwin Ephron 

Photographer 

Lester Cole 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Advertising Director 

Arnold Alpert 

New York Manager 

Charles W. Godwin 
Midwest Manager 

Kenneth M. Parker 

Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 
Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 
Promotion Manager 

Mort Winthrop 
Production Manager 

Jean L. Engel 
Advertising Staff 

Marilyn Krameisen 
Georqe Becker 
Dianne Ely 

Administrative Coordinator 

Catherine Scott Rose 
Circulation Department 
Beryl Bynoe 
Emily Cutillo 
June Kelly 

Accounting Department 
Laura Oken 
Laura Datre 
Readers' Service 
Betty Rosenfeld 
Secretary to Publisher 
Carol Gardner 

Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



EB3 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive. Editorial, 
Circulation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 
49th St. 1 49th & Madison) New York 17, 
N. Y. Telephone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. 
Chicago Office: 161 E. Crand Ave. Phone: 
Superior 7-9863. Los Angeles Office: 6087 
Sunset Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4- 
8G89. Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave.. 
Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: United 
States $10 a year. Canada and foreign 
$11. Single copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. 
Address all correspondence to 40 E. 49th 
St., N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. 
Published weekly by SPONSOR Publications 
Inc. Entered as second class matter on 
the 29 January 1948 at the Baltimore 
postoffice under the Act of 3 March 1879. 

Copyright 1957 

Sponsor Publications Inc. 



She's A Big One, 
All Right! 



WHO-TV is as big a television value — and 

getting bigger all the time! 

As of March. Ln.t year, the Iowa Television Audience 
Survey found that 74.2% of all Iowa families 
owned television sets. Today we conservativelj 
estimate that WHO-TV's coverage area has 284,500 
television sets — viewed bv over one million 
people, divided almost exactly 50-50 between 
urban and non-urban families. 

Ask Peters. Griffin. Woodward, Inc. for all the facts on 
\\ ho-TV — Channel 13 — NBC-TV in Des Moines. 




{ 



V 




who-TV is pan «f 
( rnir.il Broadcasting Company, 

Which also onus and ope 

WHO Radio, U,- M 
WOC-TV. Davenport 



WHO-TV 

Channel 13 • Des Moines 



4ip- 



Col. B. J. Palmer. President 
P. A. Loyet Resident Manager 
Robert H. Harter. Sales Man i»;er 

Peters. Griffin, VC'oodward, Inc. 
National Rt pr e s e n tstircs 




WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
SVWHO-TV 




) 



AHiliote 



SPONSOR 



19 JAM \R\ 1951 



" 'Requiem For A Heavyweight' 
by Rod Serling presented 
last night on 'Playhouse 90' 
was a play of overwhelming 
force and tenderness . . . 
an artistic triumph." 

— The New York Times 

"A dramatic knockout." 

— New York Daily News 

"A masterful contribution to 
TV Drama."— Broadcasting- 
Telecasting 

'"Playhouse 00' in its opening 
month produced four plays of 
distinct merit and wide- 
prowling freshness." 
—Newsweek 



programs for 



c 




m*$ 




I, v-v 




RA 



■a- 



■Ja 



m 








profit 





artwarnting and 
>■ and 
Frit tulhi d id for 

nothing, the money that would 

UNICB1 . "- \. • ■ >' • 

' only grand I 
but . . . great lAip." 

— l"(f - 

"In months to come it will 
prohnhht win all the awards. 

Eta anti citations tht 
art t. It in//' / last 

om of them,"— New York 
World-Tclcgram and Sun 



turn 

I* 

tangible I 

nothing hut era.- 

In tl. im 

again brilliantly 

uni'; 

var • 

of tl 

CBS I 

with the enl 

that cha ni 

Bched 

This kin- : gTammii 

Iain wl 
mo; 

and why th> 
watchii 

• 

CBS TELEVISION 



YOURQ 

FOR COLOR 




The big news in Chicago today is News in big color. 
WNBQ COLOR cameras focus on Len O'Connor for 
5-minute late news digests (7:25, 7:55, 8:25 and 8:55) 
every morning during the NBC Network TODAY pro- 
gram. Now, WNBQ adds the thrill of living color to 
the compelling draw of local news and Len O'Connor's 
authoritative reporting. 

It's a doubly effective combination, for Len O'Connor 
is. traditionally, first on the scene of action in Chicago. 
And a recent BBD&O-NBC study found that color 
doubles the audience among COLOR set owners and 



more than doubles the impact of commercial messages! 

Number of viewers? Len O'Connor averages a 50.6 
share of audience, reaching an average of 200,000 view- 
ers per program ... at an average cost per 1,000 of just 
$1.39. And they're the kind of thousands you want most 
to reach. They're 95% adults. 

In compatible color and black and white, a complete 
Len O'Connor 5-minute news program costs only $265. 
And since the big news in advertising is News in big 
color, take your "Q" from WNBQ and make your own 
headlines in Chicago with Len O'Connor! 



WNBQ 



lei'ision leadership station in Chicago SOLD BY 



(nbc) 



SPOT SALES 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 



NEWSMAKER 

of the week 



The news: Imju'i magnetic inlm tape ij used foi ihe lu^t time 
for complete prerecording of " regularly tcheduled ti program as 

Irthui Godfrey begins taping five ralenl Scouts shows. Thest < /'' s 
// Jion s Kill be televised between 25 February and 1 tpril while 
Godfrey take-* an tfrican vacation. In recent weeks ' /<' s lm* use, I 

impe* for delayed telecasts on \l est < oast oj live Veu York J 

The newsmaker: li is nol yel certain, .1 ling i" Bill 

Lodge who i- vice president in charge ol en ineerii 1! I BS thai 

.ill five <>f Godfrey's Talent Scouts shows will get on Vmpex 1 

rhere tnaj not be enough perfect-qualit) tape available before God- 

fu'\ leaves to complete the job. rapes now used in < BS delayed 

West Coast telecasts arc erased aftei each showing and re-used, 

Mni Godfrey's pre-recording of five 

30-minute shows would tit- up two- 

and-one-half reels of video tape 

1 a reel is I I inches w ide, carries 

enough tape to record 65 minutes 

of programing I . Vmpex engineei - 

are pushing hard to uet this suppl) 

of top-quality, controlled tape to 

1 BS and Lodge hopes it will 

arrive in time bo that kines will 

nut have to be employed to 

complete the five program series. 

Lodge, 22 years with CBS engi- 
neering department, has been a 
champion of the Vmpex \ i<l«-i « tape recordei From the moment of 
it- unveiling in earl) \|>ril 1956 on the eve of the \ M> N> < lonven- 
bon. We decided it was "a good horse to bet on," was in-ininu-nt.il 
in placing CBS T\ order for the fir-t three units at 175,000 each. 
NIK l\ was quick to Follow suit with an identical order. Vmpex 
has filled these order-: -till to be filled two more recorders for 
I BS I\ due in several weeks and close to 100 production-line units 
.it 145-50,000 each to t\ stations. Of the three < BS units now oper- 
ating, two are in Los Ingeles for delayed telecasts; the other in 
New York for experimental use. CBS shows that have been Vmpexed 
on the \\ est Coast since 30 Novemhei are Douglas Edwa H the 

Sews, and See It Wow (when nol on film). On tw casions, Intent 

Scouts was handled the same way. I'o plaj it safe, kines of these 
shows have been made on the Coast. The cosl ol tape recording and 
kines has proved to be about the same I hi- week, I odge and I d 
Saxe, I BS operational v.p., Hew to L.A. to see about cutting I 
on kines. 

One of the big promises video tape hold- lor the industry 
solution for the Daylight Saving time problem. Lodgi - nol think 
it will come about this year, hut doe- feel tape will have a big effect 
on DST scheduling in IO.iS. ^ 




mil 1 









SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY L95' 



BIG STAR STORES of M«- 
and long-lime sponsor of C'SCO. 
comment on entering 5'h yeo' 
of sponsorship 

"Cisco Kid has shown o 
high rating locally It hat 
brought direct so/ei 
turns for Big Star Srces 
. We also sponsor 
Cisco in Cope Girardeau. 
Mo The resuhi 
new area ore excel' 1 
Recently when the Co- 
lumbus, Miss . station 
opened, we s'orfedCsco 
fhere Already we see 
sales results Cisco 

Kid has helped all our 
big Star Stc 

THE WORLDS GREATEST MIES* U 

"THE CISCO KID" 



(2%2&V&0& 




SPONSOR • 19 JANUARY 1957 



. 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



"tJHatw W * beeB " , ' ,,,,l:,1 Week for ■ u,UoB «i ■fenrf^i ""I rep the -t..t.-.i. ..I froal 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC aml J U>I ■ f "I '1 .1-1 .-, B | l|,,,|, ,,f wlut'l 0OHUI ,1|\: 

1) Agencies, ttlu-n confronted with latest station coverage data partienlarij 
It), have been adjusting" the t. run multitudi 

adea publicl) explain, some of which ere kepi secret I 
\Mtli a >2-card pack one time, .1 18-card pack another, etc, 

2) Ju~t to make the situation still more 1 omplicated buyers and sellers an mnhiply< 
iiip the shifting coverage fignree 1.% ratings ■ proceas thai can result in oui 
audience inflation <> r deflation, with all shades of the truth somewhere in 

Nor i- anybodj reallj to blame. NCS data is iasued onlj once in I 
«.f research complexities and costs. The agencies saj the] need more imi es — 

so they "adjust* 1 [he seller likewise wants t- present an np-to~the-minul 
'adjusts." 

Take Ted Bates, for example, which makes no particulai so ret of how ii 
figures t>> arrive at a cost-p.-r-l.uiMi for a particular spot 

It crossbreeds \RR and NCS -1 data to begin with And it also jives stal 

less-than-100' i coverage in their home count) a 1 -t (on th<- the t in 

the home county must be tuned t<> thai station at least once s 1 station 

909! in \( S in it- home county; Bates would -i\>- it 1 ' m r . , in ,| 1 -t all 

a similar percentage. 

As of now, the reps are too mystified to saj much more than "for the time beii ;, well 
all have to live with it. We can't saj yet boa this is going to shake down." 

On the radio front, Adam Young, Inc., has plunged into the hassle over the lat- 
est Nielsen Coverage stud) l»> drcularixing ageneiei and others with the rep firm*! 

own analysis of the project. 

Young's document starts off with the premise thai N< v will "undoubted!) create 1 
confusion among those people charged with interpreting the data material." It then 
ceeds to: 

• Point out the "weakness'' of the lO^r cut-off for rail: 

• Criticize the limitation of audience data. 

• Note the fact there is no measurement of ont-of-home listening. 

• Suggest that the NCS #2 be used in conjunction with the Station Rep Associal 
formula in determining how to project ratings beyond the area mes 



Meantime, if tv stations have am complaints aboari 1 1 1 * - new tRF-Nielseu set 

estimates, they might as well go fight I ity Hall. 

The seven Los Angeles tv stations found that out when they lodged a protest with the ART. 

The L.A. stations asked for a recheck of the five-count] gave thi» 

market. Argued the petition: yon credit OS with an I sal ration, ■whereas 

show at least 90' of the homes in the area have tv - 

But ARF stood pat. citing the difference in the techniques of the Nielsen survey vs. the 
surveys quoted by the L.A. stations. 

SPONSOR • 19 JANUARY 1957 



I^^fl 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



The tv networks are in the midst of a vast program scramble. 

It's closely related to this season's misbegotten batch of new programs, and can be 
grouped like this: 

Category 1 : Advertisers (like General Foods and General Electric) who are scrambling 
to unload all or a part of their shows because of unsatisfactory ratings or budget over- 
extension. 

Category 2: Advertisers, like P & G, who are forsaking programs that haven't fared 
as well as expected and hopping to others in the hopes of bettering their cost-per-1,000 
position. 

Category 3: Advertisers (like Amana, Bulova, and Ronson) who are unloading com- 
pletely because they found the costs too high, or because seasonal sales patterns make net- 
work tv a "fifth wheel." (See News Wrap-up — Networks — page 70 for details of program 
checkerboarding involving P & G and Ronson.) 

Commented one network sales executive on this whirligig: 

"Often an advertiser's eyes are bigger than his stomach. Bulova and Ronson do most 
of their selling at Christmas. Amana's network bill was obviously away out of proportion 
to its entire budget. 

"But bear this in mind: for every advertiser trying to cut back, there's somebody wait- 
ing to get on. We still can recruit a substitute easily." 



Note how highly McCann-Erickson values its tv-radio department: In its new 

Lexington Ave. building, that department will be smack in the middle of two floors occupied 
by account creative groups. 

Other features of the setup include four tv-radio studios and coaxial cables to all confer- 
ence rooms and key offices. 

Tip to reps and stations: you'll find media and research on the 14th floor. 

Rent runs around $1 million a year for the 12-floor layout. That's about 7% 
of the $16-million in commissions that the occupant — just the McC-E eastern division — ex- 
pects to derive this year (McC-E's corporate headquarters remain in Radio City). 

The whole division should be settled in the new building on 26 January. 



What class of clients do agencymen rate as toughest to get along with? 
Answer: The big meat packers. 

The reason: They live in a bitterly competitive world, where every bit of the raw 
product must be utilized, the unit profit is exceptionally small, and the time-honored maxim 
is "sell it or smell it." 

The penalty of differing with this tough crowd can be quick. An agency man 
recently suggested a new merchandising approach for bulk meat to counter the sales of 
packaged meats in supermarkets. The implication that the big packer might be behind the 
times in marketing was sufficient to have the fellow banned from contact on the account. 

Look for a burst of spot orders from the automotive companies this spring. 

Sales of 1957 models are off to a good start, but what will particularly heighten the 
advertising drives are two battles for leadership: Ford vs. Chevrolet and Plymouth 
vs. Buick. 

Chrysler president L. L. (Tex) Colbert says he's aiming for 20% of the market this 
year, as against 17.1% last year. He estimates the U. S. Passenger market for 1957 
at 6.5 million cars. 

Keep your eye on this experiment suggested by food brokers in the Wilkes- 
Barre-Scranton area: 

They want the independent stores they deal with to forego their 5% ad allowance and 
pool the money for a joint campaign on local tv stations. 

The argument the brokers are advancing to the pop-and-mom stores: It's only through 
collective advertising that you'll be able to buck supermarket competition. 



10 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 



SPONSOR-SCOPE contumti . 

Program !>> program, genera] drama li network tv'i m..-.i darablc rare, 
Yon can see thai clearlj in the rarrfral tabic below prepared bj SPONSOR -« 0P1 
It ooaaiati of (1) i breakdown of sponsored network - bj types ..t the mid- 

point of the L952 53 season, 121 ., rnuiit of the 19.-.2 53 shows still .... the the 

rarviva] percentage over the four-year haul: 



PROGRAM TYPE 


L9S2-53 
SEASON 


1956-57 

-1 W>\ 


SI UN l\M|{> 


Adventure drama 
Corned) -\ u ietj 
Crime-myatei j 

!)«)( umentai \ 
General drama 


li 

16 

3 

11 


2 
1 
1 
3 
11 


LOO 


Music 

News 

Quiz-panel shows 
Situation comedy 
Sports 


11 

1 

18 

18 

4 


3 

l 
5 
2 




Straight \ai iet) 


7 








— 








TOTALS 110 m 

As a footnote: It's self-evident though DOt apparent in the figure, above V. 
program t\pes have a continuous!) high birth rate accompanied b) ■ similar!) high death 
rate; quiz shows, for instance. Bpring op and perish Like weeds. Tin- table above i- con- 
cerned strictly with survival. 

Add this to your file on network tv costs and expenditures: 

• R. J. Reynolds is beating the other two tobacco giants in the moet-for-your-moi 
race. In cost-per-1000-homes per-commercial-minute. R. J. Reynolds' -i\ shows noa 
about S2.55; Liggett & Myers' five, S3; and \mcrican Tobacco'l five, 13.0 

• Chrysler and Ford are spending about the same amount annual!) f<-r their pi 
showpieces — Climax and Shower of Stars, and Kd Sullivan. The time and talent tl 
S7,250,00O apiece. 

• Oldsmobile, RCA, and Whirlpool are putting up 1250,000 in time-talent for 

the Emmy Awards on NBC TV 16 February. (,n>*s r.,»t for the show it—If i- 

International Business Machine has taken a leaf from General Electric, start- 

ing to plant the seeds of educational incitement at the high school level 

Like GE, IBM is turning to tv to sell youth on the idea of putting -' kflUOe and 
technology high on its college study list. 

Already IBM is testing on WBZ TV, Boston, a half hour film 2000 M» thai it 
may spot in strategic markets around the country. Bent>>n 8 Bowles Hie I ambert IS the 
agency. 

Science, incidentally, is one of the '"hot" editorial subjo ts in the pri' 
days, not only because of reader reaction, but because major advertisers 
than steel. 

Warner Lambert has made an offer for the other half of the Frank Sinatra 
show on ABC TV; but Liggett & M>ers, who nabbed Sinatra tir-t. trants to think about it. 

The brand in the Warner Lambert chest that L & M appears leery about i~ I i-terinc. 

Paul Hahn. American Tobacco president, had raided I similar question when W I. part- 
nered The Hit Parade. 

The matter was settled at that time bv f casing Listerine'l lely in u^e for 

colds. 

SPONSOR • 19 JANUARY 1957 11 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued . . . 



Ford's Edsel Division is scouting tv program marts, through FCB, for a 
quality-prestige show to go on a network this fall. 

That's when the new division's 1958 (and first) models are to be unveiled. 



Agency media directors think it's about time the radio networks got together 
and arrived at some common denominator for reporting time billings. 

Network radio once again is beginning to loom importantly in the media picture, and 
it would be in the networks' own interest, the media people say, to provide dollar data. 

Both NBC and CBS refuse to give their 1956 radio sales, either gross or net. 

Contends NBC: The figures CBS uses are inflated because the discounts may run as 
high as 50%, whereas NBC talks only in net terms. 

CBS is sitting pat; one CBS Radio report is that billings in 1956 amounted to between 
$30 and $35 million. 



Revlon's George Abrams talked about a multiplicity of new air plans this week. 

He wants to: 

• Buy heavily into daytime network tv, on which he's quite bullish. 

• Test a radio announcement campaign for Sun Bath lotion, starting in Miami. 

• Test-market the first Revlon men's toiletries in March. 

On color tv costs, Revlon accepts the same principle that prevails in magazines: 35% 
to 50% extra. 



Farm service directors, on their own, are going after a bigger cut of the 
national advertising budget. 

NATRFD has set aside a sizeable fund to make up a brochure and a slide presentation. 



The Housewives Protective League — the CBS, Inc. merchandising subsidiary — wants to 
improve soft goods merchandising by radio stations. Advertisers have been complaining 
that it's too lax. 

HPL has set up an extensive fashion and style department that's going all- 
out in department store tie-ups to bolster a seven-market campaign by Waverly 
Fabrics. 

Notes Ed Wood, HPL general manager: "Radio today lacks effective service type 
shows for housewives. A woman still wants some one to talk to her about things she's 
interested in." 

(See 5 January SPONSOR-SCOPE for criticism of radio's attitude toward soft goods 
campaigns.) 



Why — despite all the hooting about the slicked-up appearance of the pitchmen on tv 
commercials — can they still sell merchandise amid such absurd surroundings? 

Dr. Ernest Dichter's publication "Motivation" has this explanation: 
"Before your very eyes this 'fast talking dude' simply, easily proceeds to do exactly 
what he had led you to thing was impossible .... If he can, you can. In other words — 
he does not talk down as expert to novice — but as novice to expert — an almost irresistible 
appeal . . . ." 



For other news coverage in this jissue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 7; New 
and Renew, page 60; Spot Buys, page 62; News and Idea Wrap-up, page 66; Washington 
Week, page 77; sponsor Hears, page 80; and Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 84. 



12 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 






frv 



urm 

H jlil 




'0| 



^Qr 


















We now have the tallest horizontal tower in the world 

Meanwhile we're operating with the 703' tower which 
helped build Eastern Iowa's largest audience. \< ^ % 

i I Nielsen ('■>.. Nov.. ]!»."iii) indicates that our •,'"">! old 
equipment cover- ;i 60-countv area, with 344,380 t\ I 
I lie boys are starting over on our new tower. \ 
ping is from H.T 

WMT-TV »CBS for Eastern Iowa • National Rep: The Katr Agency 








The world's largest home furnish- 
ing store, Barker Bros., ends a two- 
year test of Southern California 
radio and finds it good. 

A pioneer in the medium. Barker's 
had used it effectively, hut never 
as substantially as when President 
\< il Petree and Advertising Direc- 
tor Kenneth Pelton called on Mays 
& Co., their agency, for radio pro- 
motion of the firm's Diamond Jubi- 
lee Year. 

Using the new radio, they put 
jingle spots on eight major sta- 
tions. 

i Largely responsible for the more was 
a survey of new suburban areas, proving 
nearly half tlie residents were not reach- 
able by more traditional media.) 

Results: "Radio has proved its use- 
fulness to us," says Mr. Petree. 
"Best confirmation of that is our 
continued use." With a 1956 in- 
crease of 18%, and volume in its 
18 stores still climbing, Barker's 
is now refining its radio techniques 
with tests of items, days and times. 

KBIG is happy at Mr. Mays' re- 
port that "the merchandise items 
on your station had fine response 
. . . thanks to the boys at KBIG 
who have been giving the copy their 
own slant and adding to its 'sell'." 

Huge, sprawling Southern Califor- 
nia is reached best by radio: KBIG 
plus other fine stations for com- 
plete saturation — KBIG alone for 
greatest coverage at lowest cost- 
per-thousand. 




JOHN POOLE BROADCASTING CO. 

6540 lunift Blvd.. Los Angiln 28. California 
Ttttphono: Hollywood 3-330S 

Nat. Rep. WEED and Company 



1 1 




Timebuyers 
at work 



Alice Ross, Franklin Bruck, New York, thinks rating systems have 
created a monster-world. "The present rating systems are frequently 
unreliable," Alice says. "One important factor is that the samplings 
are too small. There are so many in the business that not enough 
money is spent by any one to do comprehensive research. In some 
instances, personnel is inade- 
quately prepared to do the re- 
porting." Alice feels that it's bad 



enough that these factors often 




result in widely varying figures 
among the services; but the worst 
thing is that timebuyers and ad- 
vertisers depend on such findings. 
L nfortunately. in many cases, 
ratings are used as a bible instead 
of a guide. Alice points out that 
a similar situation existed in the 
free and easy days of publishing. 
"To clean house, a single research bureau was established to check 
circulation with methods for accurate reporting."" Alice says. "Lntil 
such a single research bureau is established bv radio and tv, sup- 
ported by both agencies and broadcasters, all so-called surveys will 
continue to be un-encompassing. inefficient and in many cases 
just plain fiction. How much longer can we permit this folly?" 



Jim Watterson, Lambert & Feasley, New York, attributes the 
recent resurgence in spot radio to the mediums intelligent reapprais- 
al of itself. "When rates were reduced from the pre-television level 
to correlate with coverage, new advertisers flocked to the medium 
and old ones enlarged their budgets," Jim says. "Saturation plans 

also attracted advertisers, as well 

as improved programs." The next 
step. Jim thinks, is for the reps 
and stations to establish better 
mechanical processes for buying. 
"Present availability forms list 
spots as to their specific times." 
Jim sa\s. "To find the spots, the 
buver must plow through hundreds 
of these listings. Specific listings 
are not necessary because most 
buyers in radio are only interested 
in the time segment, say 7-9:30 
a.m. Ratings on d.j. shows do not vary considerably from one half- 
hour to the other." Jim also points out that confirmations should 
indicate the rate in order to eliminate error. And certificates of per- 
formance are often lost because some times the\ are incorporated 
into the invoice and sometimes they are on separate sheets. Simple 
standardized forms should replace these complicated procedures." 




SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 




These are the compelling talents who helped make 
such a successful year for Television's finest entertainment. 



U. S. STEEL HOUR ■ Produced by the THEATRE GUILD 



© 



SPONSOR • 10 JANUART 1057 



15 



New 
Nielsen 
Nd. 2 
PROVES 



CUutel/riWRBL-TV 





COLUMBUS, GEORGIA | 



Q 



IS 

your 

best 
choice 
for 
1957 

//V THE BILLION 

DOLLAR 

COLUMBUS, 

GEORGIA 

MARKET 



CALL HOLLINSBERY CO. 



16 



by Bob Foreman 



Agency ad libs 




"A scent of 1957 in the air' 

Scarcely two weeks of the year of l'JoT have 
gone by as I pen this and therefore, it might he 
well il I were to reflect on the vear ahead as it 
now shapes up. Of course, the calendar \ear is 
a difficult one l>\ which to chart our fair me- 
dium, since the 52-week period with which we 
must contend is generally a September-to-Sep- 
tember one. Hut already there are portents. 

For example, the programing plans of ABC cannot fail to bring 
new strength to the network. Sinatra plus extensions of show types 
which have already proved successful over there will add new ca- 
dences to the courage and inventiveness of Len Goldenson and his 
crew. So both program-wise and facility-wise things will continue 
to look up at ABC. ll hope that once we see increased audiences 
here seven days a week, however, that we'll get fewer Westerns and 
whodunits.) 

As for NBC, well, the biggest change I suppose will he the clear- 
ing out of the 7:30-8 p.m. Monda\ through Fridav strip. What will 
go in here — half-hour or hour shows, family-type or different from 
what the other two networks are offering remains to be seen. Also 
whether this move will send sets in use up to figures comparable to 
those of later night periods or will merely split the present tune-in, 
three ways, remains to be seen. I Personally. I hope NBC puts a 
different coloration on its program efforts in these five slots reaching 
for new audiences and offering both sponsors and viewers some- 
thing of a genuine choice.) 

Marked progress in daytime tv still increasing 

NBC progress in daytime tv is already marked and still growing — 
a healthv thing and to the advantage of program buyers and pro- 
gram viewers alike. ( However, I wish a dash of something really 
new would rear its head during the daylight hours hut I'm afraid the 
economics of daytime plus the tastes or habits of viewers make this 
a distant dream at best.) 

As for CBS, well, they've got the fewest changes to make, being 
the most solidly programed and solidly sold of all three. The hier- 
archy at CBS is still few in numbers, adroit in approach and 
straightforward in its techniques of arriving at tv success. 

Whether new programs of great import are on their horizons, I 
can't sav. But if such there be, I will venture that these shows are 
economical (by present-da v standards I saleable, salesworthy and 
good sales vehicles; that's the CBS philosophy, thank goodness. 

I don't know what gems, program-wise, any of the networks will 
sport next vear. Some will premiere as soon as January in slots 
where this season's non-successes have been dropped I thanks to the 
luxurv of escape clauses — possible usually on live shows alone l . I 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY L957 




i(ir,Y poiuii 



I » ' II ' II » 



IWI II \W 



r 




TENTH ANNIVERSARY 
JANUARY 22 1957 



The Channel 5 Fa mil) includes 
all Southern California viewers and 
many top Hollywood personalities 



KTLA 



CHANNEL 



Represented Nationally by Paul H. Raymer Co., Inc 




SPONSOR • 19 .JANHRY 1957 



Agency ad libs continued. 



NIELSEN 

SURVEY 

shows you why . . . 

KANV is THE Station 
to reach the rich 
NEGRO Market in 
The Shreveport Area 

Check these facts: 

1. Over 36%* of the area popu- 
lation is negro. 

2. There are 119,910** radio 
homes in the KANV Area. 

J. 43,167 Negro Radio Homes in 
the KANV Area (36%). 

4. KANV is the ONLY ALL NE- 
GRO PROGRAM Station here. 

5. KANV's MONTHLY COVER- 
AGE is 1 6,940* * homes 
reached 

... or SumL/0 of all the 

negro radio homes. 

0. Negroes here have higher than 
average incomes. 

7. KANV Rates are low. 

* Latest V. S. Census. 
•* Nielsen C. S. No. 2, 1956. 

IT ADDS UP TO THIS: 

If you want hard-sell, low- 
cost, saturated coverage of this 
rich negro market. . . . KANV 
is YOUR station. 

Proof of this statement is the fact than KANV 
Sponsors not only rpnew but increase their con- 
tracts! 

Call the KANV Rep in your area— NOW! 




can I believe, as I hear bruited about, that nothing worth a tinker's 
dam is going to show up from network producers or the inde- 
pendents. To be sure, everybody is gun shy. They've been bitten by 
high-cost situation comedies. They're off the anthology kick. They've 
turned against imitative quizzes. Dogs, horses, Indians and armor 
are no longer sure Nielsen-getters. Nevertheless, the ingenuity of 
the many folks available is bound to result in something worthwhile. 

Effect of features on net tv still in question 

Feature films, of course, are the bi» news ahead — what will the 
deluge reall\ do to network tv audiences, how selective will the 
public be, to what extent do these epics serve only as spot carriers 
regardless of how 7 they are bought and what sacrifice does an adver- 
tiser make by foregoing real program-tv? Questions like these must 
be answered before any sound evaluation of this new avenue of 
television expenditure can be made. The upcoming year should 
provide at least partial answers. 

As for radio, that is where I alreadv feel the strongest vibrations. 
The excitement, innovations, enthusiasm engendered in this medium 
by the folks shaping its new look can only mean more and better 
advertising. Suddenly it's 1940 again — with radio people talking 
up in public, with new dollars funneled this way. with interest and 
controversy and ingenuity being expended on this, the most widely 
spread, all-out means of communication we have at our disposal. 
The New Year for these tireless people should be a happy one in- 
deed. I, for one, certainly hope it turns out to be. ^ 



m iiiiiiiii inn iiiii mini in iiiiimi m iiniiin i iniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

"An adman ad-libs on tv" 

A 192 page book of selected Foreman columns from 
sponsor, released by Hastings House, Publishers, Inc., is 
now in vour bookstore. Bob's pungent commentaries on the 
broadcast industrv and his keen anahsis of its problems 
are illustrated by Al Normandia. 

The book, excerpted from columns which appeared in 
SPONSOR over the last five years, offers an 8-fold approach 
to the media: 

I 1 I The agencv and its denizens 

I 2 ) Nuts, bolts, commercials 

(3) The audience, confound "em 

l4l Sponsors, the care and feeding of 

(."> l The fine art of video 

i C> I Research — if you can call it that 

i7i The one without pictures — radio 

I !! I Color or hue. whew! 

It adds up to an enc\ clopedia of entertainment and in- 
formation. 192 pages, illustrated, retails for $4.50. 

ii mi iiiiiiiii ii in mi mini milium ™ S 




SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 



the clouds 




our new 1060-ft. tower puts us there . 



puts you on all the sets in America's 
19th industrial market! 



WNEM-TV climbs sky high in sales power. And for 
good reason. The Flint-Saginaw market is spending 
and buying more than ever before. Now it's ranked 
the nation's 19th industrial market by the U.S. 
Department of Commerce. 

What's more, our new thousand-and-sixty-foot 
tower expands our coverage to 36 counties and over 
half a million homes in this four-billion-dollar market. 
We're the one station that can reach all 580,536 sets 
. . . the only station that can give 87% penetration of 
Flint, Saginaw and all of Eastern Michigan. And 
we're the first out-state station with full network and 
local color film and slide, too. 

So, join us on Cloud 5. Cigarettes or cereal, home 
permanents or home freezers whatever you sell— Mich- 
igan's second richest market buys it by the carload. 

Sales offices in Flint, Saginaw and Bay City. 



See your Petry man 



WNEM-TV 

/"""-"-N serving Flint, Saginaw, Bay City, 
(@=J) Midland and all of Eastern Michigan. 




NBC • ABC 





THE PGW COLONEL AND MR. FIVE 

JOIN HANDS 

To reach one of America's first markets, all you have to do is contact one of the PGW 
"Colonels" and he'll tell you how you can sell Western New York with Channel 5. 
WROC-TV's maximum power reaches 300,000 plus U.S. homes — a 20% advantage over 
any other station in this area. 

The Rochester — 15 — county Western New York market served by WROC TV is a key on 
any schedule. Check your Peters, Griffin & Woodward "Colonel" for complete information. 

VOW REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 

PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD TELEVISION SALES 
Rochester's FIRST Station 



WROC-TV 



I 



CHANNEL 



A TRANSCONTINENT TELEVISION CORPORATION STATION 
Rochester Radio City • Rochester 3. N Y. • HUtler 8 8400 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 



1'' 



Jack can be there 
in ten minutes... 



And he'll be glad to be there. In fact, Jack 
Masla's the kind of man who has very little 
time to putter around in his garden simply 
because he never says "no" to a call for help. 
And when it comes to Burke-Stuart stations 
wherever they may be, Jack can really help. 
He not only has all the availabilities at his 
finger-tips, he also has a hat-full of ideas on 
how to merchandise the program and the prod- 
uct to the client's best advantage. Having 
worked on both sides of the fence— Advertising 
Agency and Radio Station— his understanding 
of the problems is crystal clear. Jack Masla 
was never a man to capitalize on friendship, 
but oddly enough, his "what can we do to help" 
attitude has made him a lot of friends. Perhaps 
Jack can be of service to you. Our telephone is : 
PL 1-4646. If Jack is out calling on someone 
else when you phone, ask for our President, 
Ted Oberf elder. He'll be glad to pinch hit. 

BURKE-STUART CO ., INC. 

Q.adia and "^JeleaUion Mtattim R.epsie4entaUuei 
60 East 56 Street, New York 22, New York 
Chicago • Detroit • Los Angeles • San Francisco 

Representing, among others: JVCFL, Chicago, Illinois, WAKR & 
WAKR-TV, Akron, Ohio, WIVY, Jacksonville, Florida, fVINS, N. Y. 



20 




49th and 
Madison 



Broadcast pioneers 

Your article I Sponsor-Scope, pa^e 11, 
December 20 1 regarding pioneering 
for names and faces at the local station 
level refers to Budd Hulich of the fa- 
mous team of Stoopnagle and Budd. 
We are pleased to advise that Budd 
Hulich and his talented wife, Helen, 
are featured Monda\ through Friday 
on "Home with the Hulichs" over our 
station Wl'l \ I T\ i in Palm Beach. 
Florida. 

W. L. Woods, national sales 
manager, WPTl . Palm Beach 

Case histories prove helpful 
Thanks for sending us data on exclu- 
sive TV Sales Success Stories. The 
"exclusives" are not easv to come by. 
Your stories proved very helpful in a 
recent client meeting. Many of our 
contentions were able to be niceh 
documented. Thanks again for vour 
immediate response! 

C. Frampton Chowenhill. account 
executive. BBDO, New York 

• SPONSOR - * Readers' Service is glad lo help 

document agency and client presentations. Ilii- 

service is available v.ithout charge to all sub- 
scribers. 

Should reps call on clients? 
I was quite put out with the candid 
statement of Jeanie Nolan of N. \\ . 
Aver regarding reps calling on the cli- 
ents, which appeared in vour Time- 
buvers at Work column. December 
29th. 

It is m\ personal opinion that the 
basic trouble with radio todav is that 
we have left its future and well being 
in the hands of a bunch of nim-witted 
cloth-heads who do not have the in- 
testinal fortitude to sell our product. 
For years over this great radio land we 
ba\e been kicking ourselves, our sales- 
men and our reps in the pants to gel 
'em to make client calls. The onlj 
thing that is reviving radio toda\ i- 
this kind of effort where we actually 
get out off our big fat duffs and sell 
the clients. 

With all due respects to Miss Nolan. 
whom I ve known for two years, which 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARV L957 



dates back t" the time when she was .1 
-i'i ratai \ in tin- Paul 1 1. Raj mei "I 
fur. I hardl) feel thai she ia qualified 
to ia) we should 01 should ool c .ill mi 
.1 client. I undoubted!) w ill be > 1 11 1 
1 ized for m) \ iew s, I «ut I m sui e nol 
b) all 

Dim \\ . Burden, co-man* 
KOIL Radio, Omaha 

• SPONSOR i- ,.i Dj la ir.ji tl..- preblra 

.•I .lin.t , llrnl I.i.l b) ■ ■ 1 • - * 1 1 -• lalBBWII it) ■ 

Intnl.- I. -11. < ..I mil Imiiii DOS n-uili r ..n lln 

ill. I »i-li ..mi- 

Listing or major advertisers requested 

I \ r been mean ins foi some 1 ime i' 1 
write and tell you uh.it .1 greal job 
sponsor i- doing with the new week!) 
ami the new format. \lso, those 
SPONSOR-SCOPES and reprints ..I 
kr\ articles are great, and we are 'ji\ ■ 
ing them wide circulation around the 
office, particularl) for research and 
Bales pui poses. 

Now we have one suggestion foi an 
article thai we lliink will l>r clipped 1>\ 
ever) station in the country. It's this: 
'.11 alphabetical li-t of major compa- 
nies which advertise, with a break- 
down under each of the brand names 
the) produce, and the agenc) which 
handles cadi. This is something which 
our salesmen *a\ the) can reall) use, 
and which, to our knowledge, is nol 
available anywhere, al least in an up- 
dated form. How does it -ouiicl to 
you? Is ii a practicable idea from 
youi standpoint? 

James M. Caldwell, promotion 
manager. II II F. Inc.. Louis- 
1 tile ' 

• SPONSOR Iflu* 1I1. Idea. v\,',i „.i,,, mi . r ... 



Orchid from Australia 

I have just had the greal pleasu f 

sighting and Lioino through sponsor's 
first issue Bince it went weekl) . 

Your editorial boys have done a tre- 
mendous job and we, t r\ inv to do a 
similar job Down I nder, salute the 
brains, enterprise and hard work that 
has gone into turning out your line 
publication. 

It must he nearl) five years -ime we 
began our mutual exchange of publi- 
cations and your progress to me has 
been dramatic. It is obvious that 
SPONSOR must have earned it and won 
its wa) to the top l>\ sheer service 
and hard work. 

Leonard Blanket, editor 
Broadcasting And Television, 
Sydney, lustralia 



AN SaoerW BUY 

IN WASHINGTON 




n 



% 



1JA\ 



The MIDDLE of Washington State, a 
growing economy based on diversified 
agriculture* and metal industries 

The Apple Capital of the World, plus 
1,000,000 new acres of irrigated 
farm lands. 

* Alcoa, Keokuk Electro, and other metal 
industries have selected Wenatchee 
plant sites due to low-cost hydropower 
from the Columbia River dam system. 
More are coming! 



The AA STATION 



That's AUDIENCE APPEAL 
We program to our audi- 
ence, with SELECTED 'op 
network programs plus lo- 
cal color . . . music, news, 
farm shows, sports — the 
things people call about, 
write in for, and partici- 
pate in. 




KPQ's 5000 W, 560 KC combination gets 
way out there, covering Central Washing- 
ton, parts of Oregon, Idaho, and Canada. 
We know because of our regular moil 
from those areas. Then too, we have no 
TV station here, we're separated from 
Seattle by the high Cascade mountains, 
and we're many miles from Spokane. 
YOU CANT COVER WASHINGTON 
WITHOUT GETTING IN THE MIDDLE, AND 
THAT'S KPO Wenatchee, Wash. 



tCT7 
: GUARANTEE 

H TO OUTPULL all other [ 

North Central 
Z Washington media 



TWO to ONE 
1 lVTTT^nrB-TiTnryt 



National Reps: Portland and Seattle Reps 

FOR|OE AND CO.. INC. ART MOORE b ASSOCIATES 

One of the Big 6 Forjoe Represented Stations of Washington State 



SPONSOR 



1 ( ) JANUARY VTn~ 



21 




WQAM 


29.8% 


Station "A" . . 


. 19.595 


Station "I'»" . . 


. Hi.:!', 


Station "C" . . 


. !)..v { 


Station --I) - ' . . 


. 6.4^5 


Station "E" . . 


. :..r< 


Station "F" . . 


. 4.7', 


Station ••<;•• . . 


. 4.695 


Station "H" . . 


. 1.595 


Station "I" . . 


. 1.595 


Others 


. 1.0% 


Hon/" r, Nov. D< c. 


1956 


! a.m. 6 p.m., Mon.-I 


ri. 



Newest Hooper puts WQAM even further 
out front with 26.6% morning ... 
32.6% afternoon . . . 29.8% all day! 

The force of Storz programming is dramatized by the swift, 
convincing change in Miami radio listening. WQAM Leaped to 
first place after less than 3 months of Storz programming. 
Latest Hooper finds WQAM even further ahead. This has been 
accomplished without a single give-away, and without a single 
contest requiring participants to be tuned in . . . in order to win. 
Already a fine buy to begin with — WQAM is now th< buy in Miami. 
Talk to the Blair man— or WQAM General Manager JACK SANDLBE. 




Today's Radio 



day's Selling 



WDGY 

Minneapolis-St. Paul 



WHB 

Kansas City 



WQAM 

Miami 



Represented by John Blair & Co. 



TODD STORZ, 

President 




KOWH 

Omaha 



WTIX 

New Orleans 



Represented by Adam Young Inc. 






SPONSOR • 19 JANUARY 1957 



» RO NSOR 




NESTLE'S MAXIMUM - VIEWER PLAN 

Multi-product firm seeks larger circulation bj buying six -li<»\%- 

on alternate weeks, rather than fewer shows on \-.« < kl\ ha- 



^Jnu Cady, Nestle v.p. in charge >>f 
advertising and merchandising, rolled 
Dp his sleeves one morning earl) thi- 
month and made the announcement: 

"Starting this January, the Nestle 
( <>. i> sponsoring six network tv 
-how-. I hi- schedule spells diversifi- 
cation with a capita] I). The entire 
plan was developed bj Bryan Houston, 
McCann-Erickson and Dancer-Fit 
aid-Sample, working as a team and it 
shows clearl) the advantages and ef- 
fectiveness of the multi-agenc) set-up." 

W ith his statement, Don Cad) and 
I he Nestle Co. made advertising news 
two ways, i 1 i It's unusual for a cli- 



ent to publicl) |>ui-<- its 
(2) Dh ei -ill' ation in network t\ 
big sw itch for the Nestle • o., which 
buill it- line ol products bj 

rotating them on one or two n 
network t\ vehicles. today, the I 
i- reaching oul for w ider i irculation 
|.\ swinging to a multi-p pat- 

tern on an altei nate-week 

It- a pattei n thai w ill b< 
widespread in 1" 

"\\ hat we call 'diversification' 
real!) a magazine approai h to network 
t\ buying," Don i>u\\ told - 
"In print we've always ! to 

buying circulation. Well, you clout 



bu) 

In line with tl 

nna. up 

■ - 

I \ 
Kri''. 

ithrough Bryan !!■ - 
for Nes 
<■ the ii - 
of the \ - I iles. 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 



23 



Nestle gets diversification of thinking by 

calling together all three of its agencies to consult 

on ad recommendations, help shape its tv shows 



For it- two instant cocoas, (through 
McCann-Erickson) , t lie Nestle Co. has 
bought lVminute segments of three 
daytime NBC TV shows on alternate 
Thursdays: Cm \ Moore. I aliant Lady 
and Our Miss Brooks, Quik and the 
chocolate bars (through McCann- 
Erickson) sponsor The Lone Ranger 
on alternate Saturdays. Other Nestle 
products both through McCann and 
through D-F-S are current 1\ not in 
network t\. However, network t\ rep- 
resents the major portion of Nestle's 
SPONSOR-estimated $9.5 million budget. 

Several developments in network tv 
liming the past year or two have set 
the stage for a trend toward program 
diversification. 

First, the days of 50 and 60 ratings 
on individual shows are past. It's al- 
most impossible to reach half or more 
of all I . S. tv homes with a single 
vehicle. Tv audiences are, in fact, 
more and more split three ways among 
the television networks as ABC TV 



closes the gap with the other networks. 

As the same time, show costs and 
time costs have both increased rapidly. 
Three or four years ago an advertiser 
could buy a half-hour nighttime show 
for about $2 million and count on get- 
ting a substantial chunk of the total 
audience if the show clicked. Today, 
bankrolling a half-hour television show 
for a year means tying up $4 to $5 
million in one vehicle with all the re- 
lated risks implicit in staking all on 
one show. 

"Diversification is the trend because 
of the money mechanics of advertising 
and tv particularly," say Don Cad\ . 

Diversification helps the advertiser 
hedge his bet. Fall 1956 saw an un- 
precedented number of network t\ 
show cancellations. While the season 
on the whole was conceded a critical 
disappointment, many of the cancella- 
tions were actuallv due to changed tv 
economics and tv thinking rather than 
the weakness of individual shows. 



Here's how Nestle executives sum- 
marize diversification advantages: 

1. Broader, unduplicated audience: 
The Nestle Co. based its decision to 
diversifj on several audience studies. 
One such study was developed by the 
\t~tle agencies and based on a special 
Nielsen analysis of the four weeks end- 
ing 20 October. It showed that Gale 
Storm's first four telecasts reached 
49.7% of all I . S. t\ homes. 

'"This is a cumulative unduplicated 
audience," Bill Templeton, Bryan 
Houston's v.p. in charge of tv and ra- 
dio, told SPONSOR. "We then measured 
the audience produced by the time pe- 
riod into which Blond ie was to go and 
found that used in combination with 
our Gale Storm show, it would deliver 
69' i of all I . S. homes in the same 
period." 

Since Blondie replaced a show of 
similar appeal (situation comedy 
aimed at the family), the client and 
agency both felt that the 20% pro- 
jected increase in unduplicated tv 
homes is a conservative estimate. 

2. More penetration for commer- 
cials: Alternate- week sponsorship of 
the two nighttime tv shows rather than 
weekly sponsorship of one does not 
give Nestle more commercial time. 
However, client and agency both feel 




Inter-agency meetings are called by Don Cady 
(center) to discuss -u. h items of general concern a* the 
shaping and buying oi a n.w i\ show. This gathering, in 
i ISn.ni 1 1 < < 1 1 ~ l < > n conference room, include- (1. to r.) Bill 
Cory, D-F-S a/e on Decaf; Ken Torgerson, D-S-F associ- 
ate media director; Bill Templeton, Houston tv-radio v.p.; 
Cady; Joe Scheideler, Houston account supervisor on Nes- 
caf« : Ed Noakes, Met ann v.p., management service direc- 
tor: John Beresford McCann account group supervisor 



Bryan Houston agency handles the two nighttime 
■ ,i Nescaf Discussing m" commercials (1. 

lor.): Em le.tvwriter; Joe Scheideler, account 

ffi ' Walshe, t\ producer; < lift Kulesca. 

i in commercials; Bill Templeton, v.p. tv-radio 








Nestle's plans board makes n I. , ,, ,,,,,- \ 

distant; Dick Goebel, ad m a n ager; l>"n • ad] < p i hn riisii 



t hiit it provides greater penetration foi 
the commercials. 

"If your commercial < > ti one show 
produces a Gallup-Robinson •■( (>"'. 
stration and r >< >' . registration on 
your other show, then you're getting 
1J|»',. ^ lt \, Don Cady. "This is an- 
other supporting argumenl l"i diver- 
sification." 

3. Continuity in advertising effort: 
for impulse-purchase items thai .n>- 
drug or grocer) distributed, continuity 
in advertising effort is of primary im- 
portance. Continuity in t\. however, 
need not mean week!) exposure. 

Alternate-week sponsorship "f a 
program with which we're identified 
actual]) gives u- excellent continuity.' 1 
says Don Cad) . " Vnd with our di- 
versification plan, we ai tuall) 
week]) exposure on two nighttime 
shows through <>nr cross-plug arra 
ment with the other 9pons 

Circulation lias become a priman 
consideration to Nestle in planning its 
network t\ effort for the year. S 



i idy: "Ever) stud) on t\ and ad 
rising costs thai we've made ri.t- shown 
u~ thai t\ i- the lowest i ost medium in 
terms ol impact, Nut the most expen- 
sive in terms ol initial investment in 
show sponsorship, [Tierefore it's in- 

isingl) importanl foi us t" 
mam peoph ilar 

and continuou 

\. H 
ship ••! a half-hour network t\ show 
implies an initial investment of 84 mil- 
lion | illion pi 
budget for 
chandisii - >uld 

ARTICLE IN BRIEF 

Diversification is Nestles new con 
cept for effective network tv buvm^ 
Instead of full sponsorship of shows, 
the firm both hedges risk and increases 
audience by alternate week sponsor 
ship of six tv properties Planning is 
joint work of Nestle s three agencies 



produce disappoint ii 

.% ltd all ' 
in il 
repl i 

■ well in 

■ 

the 



"If ll 

■ 



SPONSOR 



1') .i \\i \ri 195" 



HOW TO BUY SPOT RADIO 

Haste doesn't neeessarily make waste when you buy a short-order spot radio 
campaign if you take a few pointers from timehuyers and reps who know the 

shorteuts and the safeguards. Primary among them: organization in advance 



M 



lost people at ad agencies and 
representative firms who are direct!) 
involved in the launching of a flash 
spot radio campaign look upon this 
particular media buy as a chore — and 
an inescapable one. 

The) know that halcyon day will 
never come when I 1 I even client 
plans his media schedules enough 
ahead of time so there's a minimal 
strain on muscle-power and brain- 
power, or when (2 I clients will be in 
a sufficient!) safeguarded marketing 
position to even attempt such a 
smooth-running approach. 

There'll always be an emergency. 
And. because spot radio is particular- 
l\ matched to the needs of emergency 
situations, it's a medium frequentlv 
chosen to trouble-shoot for the adver- 



tiser with a last-minute problem. 

The emergence of course, may be 
fancied. A product, uncertain of its 
own media selections, may consider it 
an emergency when a competitive 
brand swoops into spot radio. At that 
point, for "competitive" reasons, the 
first manufacturer will adopt a copy- 
cat approach and buy the same. (This 
is particularly true of cigarette com- 
panies. I 

There are more legitimate emergen- 
cies, however. A quick price change, 
a local distribution problem, a sud- 
den flu epidemic or a major weather 
change, a quick introduction of a new 
product, a strong competitive copy 
theme which needs quick rebuttal — all 
these hinge on a time element and the 
compulsive need for immediate action. 



Once the need has been established 
and the decision for a quick busing 
tactic and a fast launching has been 
made by the client and the account 
group, the hard work starts. This 
work can be eased considerably, bow- 
ever, by the application of a few basic 
rules in procedure. 

sponsor asked both agency buyers 
and station representatives how their 
jobs could be simplified and how — at 
the same time — the fast, flash bu\ 
could be more productive. They all 
agree that the adage, haste makes 
waste, has certain elements of fact in 
it. But thev likewise agree that the 
best countering force to buying mis- 
takes is organization. 

This precept for judicious and pro- 
ductive buying is, of course, no dif- 




Newspaper strike in Cleveland prompted 
Pontiac to divert print monej to spol radio 
though it already had spot drive running 




New-car announcement copj needed extra 
impact, so Pontiai chose schedules on sta- 
tions KYV WERE, W«. \K. WHK, W.IW 



Problem: Cleveland newspaper strike. Ans\ 




Solution i" emergencj was spot radio, with details set bj (1. to r.i Joseph ^padea. 
II. I. Christal representatives; Wm. \. Bushway, a~~t. buyer, McManus, John & \dam-. 

Pontiac agency in Detroit: Chuck Campbell, chief hn\er: John Hartijian. as-t. Inner 



26 



SPONSOR • 19 JANUARY 1957 



ferenl i"i the quit k. three-da) bu 
period than for a campaign which is 
planned and I > < n i u- 1 1 1 meticuloush "\«-i 
.1 iiiiniih - i ime, Hut the closei the 
deadline i"i l>"th buyei and rep, the 
i ■ hi u • - 1 1 1 the need I ganization. 

Whal are Borne "I these techniques 
in organization, some "I the 
guards which can l»- adopted t<> make 
the fast bu) an effortless one and i 
more meaningful one? 

Buj ii- and reps agree thai the 
gesl single factoi is an undei stand 
oi w h.it the client is attempting to <l<>. 
Ami the representative, .1- well .1- the 
buyer, must know this down i" the last 
local sales objective in ordei to suppl) 
.1 quit k .mil producth e buj ing answei 
to the problem. 

Neither the buyei noi the rep 
should I"- "stifled," is the waj Helen 
Wilbur, broadcast buying supervisoi 
at Grej Advertising, puts it. " Vfter tin- 
Inner gets briefed lull\ b) the account 
ui"ii|>. this information must be passed 
on to the rep. We should give him as 
much leewaj .1- possible and let him 
use his own initiative in making rei 

'imiiicinl.il ions. 

Ilic How ol ideas between buyer and 
ic|> must be even more flexible in .1 
situation where both air working 
against time. This is the contention "f 
Hill Pellens, buying supervisoi .it Mc- 
Cann-Erickson who recommends tlie 



r 



ARTICLE IN IIHii I 



Launchm.; 1 t 1 .t ) . f prodm I • 

radio campaign raktt j lot of stream 

lining and pre planning Reps and I 
crs outline precautions and H hfli . 
which help 3 client go on the air to 
solve emergency situations, such 
copy change, competition, price h 

pun ioda rati 

spe« ih' time -l"t- 

"Rathei than .i-k f..i I 
,i-k l"i the type "t annoui 
want in the 8 to II a.m. pel iod 

it up i" tin- rep .mil tin- station t" 
11- tin- best -l"t- ill- I i" 

1 ..lit. ili.- commercials throu thoul that 
time span. I In- probabl 
broadei audieni e an) wa) and it -; 
up the bu) be< ause there's no timi 
minute-b) -minute availabil 

\\ Inn the station representative i» 
n latitude, the buyei i- likelj t" 
1 much better buj h>r hi- > lient, 
-.i\ - M'iri i- Kellnei . 1 adii 

!•■ 1 I he Kit/ Vgency, national 
representative In m. 

"If the buyei W ill tell 11- the -1 

dollai "i announcement allocation per 
market, .mil let us help him administer 
it. we think we'll get something extra 
special in the wa) "f times and audi- 



p P ntiac added spot radio drive in three days 




Direct call to -taiu>n~ bj Chock Camp- Three-day ■ ended trill 

bell informed them he'd tl\ t" Cleveland for alities lik-- KYWs I •••■ Fii 

one ila> to rinali/e the local radio plana there P ■ 



Ml I 

'l • ' 
whn h lake 

"\\ hen 

I I.. In • 

itlll'.il- In || 

relet 

It .ill mf. 
buyer, hi 

Style. I 

i"ii- ..ii ' 

laum hed 

Viol tl 
pro! 

what 

the ' 

\l 

when lie 

■ I 
which should 

in.il 
f<«r\- 

• Ii" 1 "|.\ t" ti 
If 

th.in hk**|\ will 

? 

.ti"ti whieh. *hrn th»> a« tual 
hu\ - mpleted, 

..f the linrup. Rut a faM baying ram- 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 






FAST CAMPAIGNS continued 



paign implies a fairh good idea on the 
pari nf tlic Inner as to the ke\ stations 
which will be used. 

If. on the other hand, the emergency 
situation requires new copy, this can 
be wired tn the stations on the list or. 
in a ver\ tight time situation, tele- 
phoned. 

Morton Bassett, account executive at 
John Blair \ Co., advises agencies to 
send copy — either transcribed or live 

to the commercial manager. "He's 
the one with whom we work and the 
one person at the station who knows 
the most about this last-minute cam- 
paign. Too often a lone e.t. is mis- 
directed and when the time comes for 
airing the copj can't he found." 

The rep. of course, relies on the tele- 
pin mi- and the teletype to handle 
agency-rep and station-rep communi- 
cations. If the buying group at the 
agene\ i> sudicienlK organized before 
placing that first call to the rep, what 
follows on the part of representatives 
is largely mechanical and clerical. 

The "selling" h\ the rep, contrary 
to some misconceptions, does not take 
place at the time of actual buying. 
This is why the mechanics of the buy- 
ing system — rather than creative sell- 
ing — take over after that first agency 
call for availabilities. 

The time for reps to sell their sta- 
tions, the station personality and the 
representative's individual integrity 
and servicing stvle is between buys. 
"Once we start bus ing," says Jeremy 
Sprague, Inner at Cunningham & 
Walsh, "we have no time for a com- 
plete station briefing on coverage, total 
ratings, public service and sales re- 
sults. Then we're down to the short 
strokes, particularl) when we're buy- 
ing a fast, last-minute campaign." 
Helen \\ ilbur agrees, stating "Indi- 
vidual station pilches should be made 
long before the buying on any cam- 
paign is started. " 

"Emergency, last -minute buying 
should be treated as just that," says 
Avery-Knodel's Tormey. "Both the 
salesman and the buyer should roll up 
their sleeves and dig into the situa- 
tion, cooperating in every way possi- 
ble. This often means the rep sits in 
the buyer's office until midnight work- 
ing out details. It means a sharing of 
information and a give-and-take of 
thinking all the way down the line." 

What are some txpical "emergency" 

situations, when the buyer on short 

notice was alerted b\ the account 

up to launch a fast spot radio 

drive in multiple markets? 



► Competition: One food product, 
which has two major competitors, was 
confronted with a price increase intro- 
duced by both of them. The prob- 
lem: the retail grocer would be tempt- 
ed to jack-up local-level prices on all 
three, even though Product A was still 
costing him- and the consumer — the 
same amount. The answer: a fast 
spot radio campaign announcing to 
local customers that the price of Prod- 
uct A was remaining the same. The 
objective: to increase sales for the 
product and also to successfully block 
the grocer from hiking the product's 
cost. 

► Newspaper strike: Main advertis- 
ers swooped into spot radio in Cleve- 

glllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllinilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll; 

These steps help make 
speedy buying easier 

ORGANIZE exact needs of the cam- 
paign before contacting any rep. 
Pre-planning in detail is a must 

PREPARE a complete market list and 
probable stations to be bought be- 
fore asking for specifics from rep 

ISSUE shipping instructions on copy 
before actual buying starts so it 
arrives in local areas on time 

BRIEF station reps fulh on alloca- 
tion of money or announcements by 
market and on over-all objectives 

ELIMINATE unnecessan detail. 
Take availabilities over the phone: 
cut down on market data and ratini;- 

BE FLEXIBLE. Give the rep leeway 
in clearing times besl suited to 
your budget, your special emergency 

lllllllllllllllllllllllll Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Illlllllllllllll Mill 

land during the recent newspaper 
strike there. Two products moving in 
fast with money allocated originally to 
newspaper were Pontiac and Cadillac, 
out of MacManus. John \ \dams in 
Detroit. Chuck Campbell, head buy- 
er on the cars, called in Detroit sta- 
tion reps to line up initial schedules 
and then hopped a plane for Cleve- 
land. There he conferred with indi- 
vidual station management and per- 
sonalities and gave them live copy, 
thus managing to get the campaign 
finalized and on the air in three short 
davs. 

► Extra money: Texaco had some 
monev available at the end of its fiscal 



\ear and decided to add intensity to 
its current spot radio drive. Chro- 
nology of the buying: Buyer Jerr\ 
Sprague was alerted by Cunningham X 
Walsh account people at Thursday 
noon that the Texas Co. wanted to go 
into 40 more market areas. By late 
that same afternoon. Sprague had 
worked up a station list of 80 outlets, 
two per market. On Frida\ morning 
he started to call the representatives 
and by Friday afternoon he had com- 
pleted the buying. In less than a day. 
the reps had contacted stations, cleared 
time and verified — by phone — the 
agency order. It took a day and a 
half for C\\\ to position and to buy 
40 announcements in each of 40 mar- 
kets — a total of 1.600 individual time 
periods. 

Two factors made this buy easier. 
Sprague says. "Because this was an 
addition to a current campaign, the 
reps already had a detailed briefing on 
what we were trying to accomplish. 
\nd we also had on hand current copy 
which we could shoot to these extra 
stations fast." 

Even though both the agency and 
the station representative is geared to 
fast buying and fast servicing, spokes- 
men in both types of shop think a lot 
of so-termed emergency buying isn't 
really necessary. They point to the 
possibility of a buyer crying "wolf" 
too often — of continually buying on 
short notice, so that reps are on the 
defensive. 

Tormey of Avery-Knodel summa- 
rizes much of the combined thinking. 
"Buyers, and the account group peo- 
ple particularly, should realize that 
only with pre-planning and advance 
notice can the\ get the best possible 
bin and the best available adjacencies. 
The more time they give to planning 
and buving, the less likeh they are to 
be mouse-trapped and to find their 
ulcers popping! Spot radio is being 
used increasinglv as a primary me- 
dium, rather than as an incidental one. 
and it's rough finding good time peri- 
ods for any campaign these days — 
and particularly for the short-notice 
ones." 

Everv rep is geared to launch a fast 
campaign, sa\s Kellner of Katz. "But 
getting good time periods at the last 
minute is like going to the box office. 
Maybe you do and maybe you don't. 
The two biggest things the buyer needs 
to do is share all advertiser informa- 
tion with the rep and then have faith 

Mt n i mi ' ^^r 



20 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 










Good hand models like Maureen Bailey, pictured here will 

THE ART OF CASTING TV COMMERCIALS 

A miscast commercial can H<>|> as bad!) as ;« miscasl show. Hen 

arc casting tips Prom experts along with views <>u latesl trends 



f\ successful television commercial 
i- the product "I two worlds one 
symbolized 1>\ Madison Avenue, tin- 
other In Shuberl \ll-\. Uthough 
mam -how people have - --'ull\ 
aged the transition from entertain- 
ing to selling, the business of selecting 
the right talent and maintaining 

working relationship with them 
remains a major problem in t\ adver- 
tising. The solution lies with the tal- 
ent, the talent's agent and th>- casting 
director. And each views casting from 
his own benchmark. 

( asting the l\ commercial,' 
an actor, "is a cross between a lottery 
and a cattle auction." 

"'lalent agents could do a better job 



■ it -. reening, 

ing direi t^i . " Vbout 2 Ft! 

i around aren t ■ 
to "ur requirements, and 

id) known i 
own 

" Die t\ conn 
ttdt\ - i talent and 

- - 
■ 
ones learnii 
W hat the] 
thei: 

fleeted in tli - 
- 
Henn > . Brow i 
tive tal- 
ial field, offers th> - 



I. s 

■ 

be 

- 
- 



SPONSOR 



1 ( ) .1 \M \K1 I95"i 






New trends in casting tv commercials are: 

screen tests for talent, actors favored over models. 

Dubbing in of voices is no longer recommended 



nately, the "cold reading" is the com- 
mon way of casting. 

4. Sponsor and ad agency might 
profit h\ casting with an open mind 
rather than being locked on some pre- 
conceived notion of how a part should 
be read. Actors are creative, too. 

5. In casting, it is not neatly as im- 
portant to know what an actor has 
done as what he can do for this par- 
ticular job. 

6. Screen tests are helpful in cast- 
ing. If the talent agent has such film. 
it may be submitted to agency along 
with "stills" before the actor is sent 
around in person. The screen test for 
tv commercials has been gaining 
ground in the last two or three years. 
Iodav. many ad agencies make their 



own screenings and keep them on file. 
Once the casting has been com- 
lilted. Brown feels these three things 
are important to establish a practical 
working relationship with the talent. 

1. The ad agency should make the 
actor feel he is part of their sales team 
and thereby reap the benefits of his 
instinctive urge to inventiveness. 

2. Invariably the actor has had a 
long working knowledge of problems 
involved in producing commercials. 
Use his experience. 

3. Never dampen his enthusiasm 
for the job by contractual insecurities 
and skimping on payments. Work out 
just compensation. 

Mel Goodman, who recently joined 
Brown after more than six years as 



DO'S AND DON'T'S OF CASTING 

DO gi v *-* the actor who is trying out, a storyboard to look at in 
addition to the script. Direct him through the action. Set up 
your casting office to resemhle sound stage to test movements 

DO ."' ve the talent agent more than a two-line description of what 
kind of talent you need. Fill him in on client's prejudices regard- 
ing talent, also on thinking behind the commercial and its aims 

DO make the talent finally selected feel they are part of your 
sales team. An actor's native creativity enables him to contribute 
something special to your commercial. Utilize his experienci 



DON'T make snap judgments in casting. Try to visualize the 
actor in the finished commercial, and rely more on what be can do 
for this job than on what jobs he has done in past. Be a showman 

DON'T'^st hard-to-work-w ith talent and then force them on ymir 
commercial producer. The producer's bid is based on time and if 
miii casting run- him into overtime, he may a-k you to paj for it 

DON'T be tooled bj those confident looking kids in casting chil- 
dren. Tbey'rr the ones who generally blow up or freeze. Make a 
warm advance to the child. If he rejects it. look for trouble 



casting director and producer for 
Compton Advertising, suggests that ad- 
vertising agencies can improve and 
speed up casting if they actually go 
into the creative aspects of the story - 
board with their talent agents rather 
than supply them with simply a two- 
line description of what an actor 
should look and sound like. This would 
assist toward more realistic casting, 
w hich Goodman favors. 

"Too many of us involved in tv 
commercials," he says, "are guilty of 
casting Hollywood stereotypes. The 
idea that the role of a doctor must be 
played by an actor with graying tem- 
ples is wrong. Walk down any hos- 
pital corridor and you'll see no two 
doctors look alike. It takes real peo- 
ple to sell products." 

Doris Gravert. casting director for 
Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, is another 
advocate of off-beat casting. Hoyvever, 
she points out that a tv commercial is 
not a tv show, and that a one-minute 
commercial allows no time to develop 
a character portrayal. Much judgment 
and showmanship is needed in casting 
off-beat types. If it takes 50 seconds 
to convince an audience that this is 
really a doctor they are seeing, then 
there's only 10 seconds left to get 
across the sales message. As for 
screen tests. Miss Gravert prefers to 
see talent ahead of screenings. When- 
ever one is considered advisable. D-F- 
S w ill make its own. 

Agency casting directors have their 
own specific gripes in this relatively 
infant business of tv commercials. 
Naturally, they involve both talent and 
talent agents. For example. Miss Gra- 
vert feels many talent agents do a dis- 
service to their own stable of talent by 
asking for exorbitant fees for their 
clients simply because an ad agencj 
phones and requests a certain perform- 
er. \\ hen the talent agent knows a 
certain piece of acting property is in 
demand, they frequently price that 
property right out of the job. 

Foote. Cone di Belding's casting di- 
rector. Joan Humer. complains that all 
too often talent agents don't send what 
she asks for. Pictures ("stills") bear 
little resemblance to the talent when 
they finally show up in person. Some- 
times these stills are overglamorized, 
sometimes ihev make the actor appear 
younger or older than he is. She sug- 
gests that stills include: i 1 I full-length 
shot, (2) happv shot, i 3 1 "plain 
American girl or boy" and i4i glamor 
shot. 

At Young & Rubicam. Casting Di- 






SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 



in toi Vlai ge Kri i feels thai free I tni i 
talent complicates i Bating. I odaj . an 
agenl ma) send around an actreaa who 
doesn't gel tin- pai t. I hree months 
from now . foi .1 different comraen ial 
.in. .1I1. 1 agenl sends the same ^ i 1 1 and 
■he b in. I hen the firal agenl phones 
and wants t" know, "How come? 
I lii- i- .in area thai is sti i> il\ .1 talenl 
representative problem and should nol 
com >•! 11 the a< I agencj > a-t ing direi 
tor. \i ^ &R, the) rel) he&\ ilj on the 
talenl agent. 

To casting directors, ( Ihai lea I!. 1 1 .1 
mini, anothei leading New lmk talenl 
agent, offers tlii- ad\ ice: 

1. Do casting fai enough ahead i" 
insure booking time <>f performers 
w iili bus) schedules. 

2. It there is an) chance — 1 1 > ► « • r i r 1 ^_- 
(.in 1 be completed on schedule, book 
u iili holdovei time. I For example: 
'■\\cif booking you definitel) l"i 
Thursda) but give 11- Frida) for hold- 
over." If shooting is finished fhurs- 
day, there is no charge for Friday. 
On the other hand, if talent gets an- 
other i"l> for Friday, the) have the 
righl to ask tin- casting director t.. 
confii mi the Frida) holdover. 1 

Never count on inexperienced 
talenl to cul costs. I he) cosl \ '>u 
mone) in the long run. 

I. Uways li'"k .it tlir hands, espe- 
ciall) if am manual operation is in- 
volved. Attractive, stead) hands are a 
rarity. \ prett) hand is nol the onl) 
requirement fur a hand model. The 
person must be dexterous since man) 
product demonstrations involve nor- 
mal!) awkward |n>>ilii>n-. \n<l if it's 
.1 wrist-watch commercial you're do- 
ing, look above the hands and make 
' ertain the) an- nol at the end 01 a 
hair\ arm. 

Hill Hurt/, producer f"i Los \n- 
- studios i>f Shamus Culhane Pro- 
ductions, adds these tip-: ' 1 1 Beware 
of thf "clothes-horse" model in a com- 
mercial; it i- surprising how few of 
them know how to move around. 
\n actor makes an intangible contribu- 
1 Please turn to i<n-,- ,", '. . 

ARTICLE IN BRIEF 



More care is going into the casting 
of a tv commercial than ever before. 
Screen tests are now being used by 
agencies and talent agents. A trend 
away from stereotype "Hollywood'' 
models to off-beat casting has devel- 
oped, as more actors enter the field. 




Prc-casting conference: 

» itli \\ all 



"Let's try it this way." 
Vuditionin 

■ .n fri.m \ • 

Marshall Si 

.vhili Norma 
Kummel's l\ pro lu< lion 
■ ..|i\ supen .- 5hi Idon 

I'laii and Harriet Pirk, lo 




"She's in." 

1 
Mel < I "» ,n| 






SPONSOR 



19 .1 \m vky 195*3 






THIS WE FIGHT FOR 

SPONSOR presents its 1957 editorial platform, putting causes 

we will campaign for during the course of this year on record 



^>i'()NS()i;*s basic publishing philosophy has re- 
mained unchanged over its 10-year history. It lias two 
straightforward tenets: (1) to provide useful facts 
and figures for its readers; (2) to lead the way edi- 
torially toward industry improvements. 

sponsor periodically expresses its editorial plat- 
form under the heading "This We Fight For." Below 
is sponsor's 1957 platform, the third such public 
statement since sponsor first published a "This We 
Fight For" in 1953. 

On the page at right is a reproduction of the first 
"This We Fight For" together with a report on prog- 



ress made and progress yet to be made toward each 
of sponsor's original goals. 

Many of the objectives for which sponsor will cam- 
paign during 1957 are little different from those list- 
ed in 1953 — for these are goals not easily attained 
even over a span of years. Others are new, in tune 
with cfianging times and conditions. 

sponsor's campaigning takes several forms, includ- 
ing articles, editorials, features and a unique one- 
paragraph form of editorial which appears each 
issue under the heading "This We Fight For." 



1. We fight for an accurate industry tv set count done on 
a continuing basis. The advertiser is entitled to exact infor- 
mation on market-by-market audience potential of television. 

2. We fight for a radio buying philosophy based on quality 
as well as quantity. The trend toward saturation buying can 
be harmful if the values of the medium are lost to tonnage. 

3. We fight for a better evaluation of advertising media — 
especially tv and radio. Reliance on carefully-researched 
data and full analysis of marketing facts must replace emo- 
tional thinking and follow-the-leader tactics. 



4. We fight for better t\ am 



radio ratings — and clearer 
evaluation of them. We urge that a field test of existing 
rating methods be conducted by an independent body like 
the Advertising Research Foundation. We work to throw 
light on the weaknesses and strengths of ratings and to con- 
vince advertisers that ratings are not the ultimate test as to 
whether a sponsor's interests are being effectivelv. served bv 
a program or adjacency. 

5. We fight for improved timebuyer and mediabuver status 
at agencies. We fight for greater recognition of the expert 
role an experienced buyer should be allowed to play. 



6. We figbt for consideration of spot — both tv and radio — 
as major media. Spot can play a strong task force role but 
it is often tremendously effective when included in the adver- 
tising plan as a basic component. 

7. We fight for program experimentation by stations and 
networks and the development of fresh new program ideas. 
We oppose the play-it-safe philosophy which can onlv mean 
stagnation for tv and radio programing. 

8. We fight for the preservation of free tv as opposed to 
fee tv. A change in the basic American pattern of com- 
mercial broadcasting should not be allowed to endanger 
the foundations of a medium which has well served the 
public interest. 

9. We fight for first-hand knowledge of tv and radio sta- 
tions by national advertisers, advertising agencv and net- 
work executives. We urge a grass-roots approach to stat 

so that national-level executives do not fall prey to "ivorj 
tower"' thinking. 

10. We fight for adberence to industr) codes hv stations 
and sponsors alike, and for the highest standards of truth- 
fulness and good taste in t\ and radio commercials. 



32 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 



11. \\ i- fighl i"i regulai publication |>'.i and network 

radio expendil urea bj parties | > 

a\ ailable Foi .ill othei majoi tnedi i 



14. \\ ■ 



1 2. W e ii lit i"i •• lull and a< i ui ate counl ol radio I 
Ever) medium is entitled i" fail ent, but 

radio's personal -<i listening and oul of-home Ii t< have 

ii< >t M't been lulU gauged 

13. Wt fight l"i better, more effective commercials; we 
fighl everlastingly t" keep the advertise! aware ol thi 
portance ol making lii- ri.imiu-ni.il the best possible - 

man f<>r \\\- product. We urge the importa f allottii 

sufficientl) large budget for the | luction ol effective 

commercials. 



15. a 

be shown m 
potenl 

16. W 

17. \\ . i 
station i 

■ ii rate i ards. a* 






What's happened since SPONSOR'S first "This We Fight For"? 



sponsor's ti r ~ i "This W( Fighl For' 
appeared in the 9 February 1953 
i — . 1 1 •■ . W hat's happened sini i ' 
You'll find ,i digesl ol developments 
numbered to coincide «iili the "M-i 
n.il platform plank- below ; 1957 
platform is outlined on facing page 

1 . Full count of radio list) ning : 
progress in out-of-home and multi- 
Mi measurement; much more needed. 

2. Better ratings: There are Mill 
Ban] flaws, much confusion. 

3. rimebuyer status: it has grown; 
l'i">7 should see big progress 

4. V t\ promotion bureau: IMS is 
established on a strong basis. 

5. Program experimentation: The 
industry still lags in development 
of fresh program ideas. 

6. Radio's permanenc] : The idea 
lia- long since faded that radio is 
i>n the wa> out. 

7. Million-dollar BAB: K IB is neai 
tin- goal, has wide industry support. 

8. Better commercials: < reativirj 

tade major strides but many 
commercials ,ir.' an after-thought. 

9. Prii in- t\ : l\ costs jumped but 
circulation kepi pace. 

10. Rep's role: Create] recognition 
"f lii- contribution now. 

11. Sound networks: I nit\ sport- 
son urged has been .1 basic objective 

li network bul flare-ups, partii 
nlarU in radio, continue periodically. 

12. Realistic rates: sponsor be- 
lieves radio has undersold itself in 
nam time periods. 

13. Foolproof ratings: There .in 
none anil there's been little new 
praciical thinking. 

14. Ease in buying spot: Some 
progress, much more needed. 

15. Station awareness: Vdmen still 
travel too Utile. 




THIS IE FIGHT FOR 



In our opinion, ihr ptopajf. mlr eJ a 
lra.Hr paper Ii not <.nl. t.i inf'.rm. but 
la UCtivoJj lead the -a* ITONKM hat 

huill on thi*. concept, anil it* unu*ual 
growth i* in pood mea*ure due to the 
need*. H ha* vrn. the nu^ it ha* 

••poaasbl 

The true leM of a track pap- 
lOT i* hi* abiltt\ lo foru* OH kr> n^rr* 
Mhr* within thr tndu«tr> hr vr\e« thr 
soundneas with which h^ analwr* an 
indu*trv problem, the wa» in whuh he 

Ih L* It 

Dunns SPONSOR*! «•» vfir« »r ha*r 
foUfrM for a full and *- « uratr • ount of 
radio li*irmng, for better commercial*, 
for proper u*e of radio and TV rating*. 
for w cro aa td reeopnitiori of n- 
rra, for reaHatM radio ratr* for nr» 
and i rratt*e program EoflOB. f<-r the 
formation of a BAR. for DOOoVntr <n 
radio*! future, for a T\ KoTfOfl 
parable lo radio'* BAB. for re.-rgam 
/alion of the NAB no* WRIT 
a new name for ■pot Ihr***. jnd man* 
<>thrrv are the COOM 

[>t it he *aid that >r..\ 
wr ha\e made our mi*ukev ha* hren 
no f eace M tiaeWMa t 

Toila* (he ihm** art M < 
in.prn\emrnt* »e hght for arr "- 
in r* h hi iracUl i**ue ft' v| thrm 
forth hneh\ here » thjt r\+r\ 
will know what lhe\ jr- 

I Wr n*ht for a full and ajmrate 
count of radio lt*ientn^ 
medium i« entitled to ( < 
•uremenl. hut radio*! pergonal *e! 
ti*teninj: and 
have not hern pro; - 

J U* Kajfl for hettrr | | 
rating*. a<* \ » ■•■ m raaJ 
of them Me are 
radio and T v > 

ultimate in deriding whether a 
I * nalefeati are hem | effe*- 



» hi* prr«rnl pur 
fha*e n..r thr ultimate in dV 
-hal |0 lu> Mr aVajrl !■• threw 
light Bfl Ih*- »'• 
Mrength* of ratio**, nfu 
\rrtt*era i" thr-r limitation* a* -ell 
a* w 

Ur ha hi for timehu»er »• . 
all ad*rrti*.n* aa-rrw tn 

■ 
1-uvrr M 

ment of a J\ promotHMi re^rar- h 
hurra - 

li*mir 
Ue f\g* 

- 

in rr» 

T\ 

. B\R 
j« I.- . 



rv o* oi a* 

in u 

i Itwm, 

- 

II « • 

—with, ol . o» 



■ 



12 *» ( 

. ,rwl T\ • . 

-.r lav iam 
1 ■ 
loalprool .«■ ( . » ( 



I I '* '<ka4W •( r« 

4m a 

raotr f*t •o«U W W-' 
oU W faW* 






I . — . lrdr»* 
Itenai 

■ 

■ 
i>»r^ii>. »..«tli 




A GRAIN (OR MORE) OF SALT 



Everyone you talk to in media talks about PLUS MERCHANDISING that goes 
with their service. And from years of getting the short end of the stick you've 
sprinkled their promises generously from that box of salt you keep 
hidden in your desk. 

THROW THE SALT AWAY, when KEYSTONE BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
makes the promise, because we don't rate grains of salt. We get buckets of 
appreciation from our advertisers — not for idly given promises of plus 
merchandising but for DELIVERING WAY BEYOND THE PROMISE and for 
EXTRA SALES ACTUALLY MADE by our radio station affiliates who GET OUT 
AND WORK when they get a campaign through KEYSTONE! 

And the Keystone audience of rich Hometown and Rural America represents a 
LIVE market that is the backbone of the U.S. consumer index ... 90 million loyal 
Keystone listeners — available to you through the 920 Keystone affiliates. 

Now look! We're either joshing or we're loaded for you with marketing and 
sales-making ammunition you need. Why don't you ask us to come in and 
let you see for yourself. Call us! 




Send for our new station list 



CHICAGO 

111 W. Washington 
Sla 2-8900 



NEW YORK 

580 Filth Ave. 
PLaza 7 1460 



IOS ANGELES 

3142 Wilshire Blvd 

DUnkirk 3-2910 



SAN FRANCISCO 

57 Post St. 
SUtter 1-7440 

a minute or a lull hour — it's 



• TAKE YOUR CHOICE. A handful of stations or the network 
up to you, your needs. 

• MORE FOR YOUR DOLLAR. No premium cost for individualized programming Network 
coverage for less than some "spot" costs. 

• ONE ORDER DOES THE JOB. All bookkeeping and details are done by Keystone, yet the best 
time and place are chosen for you 



34 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 



Tv programing and costs 

COM PARAGRAPH 



I his i- the iliiid oi sponsor's new • omparagraph sections. 
Ii i- designed to give readers .1 monthl) updating on t\ net- 
work programs, sponsors and costs plus basii data 
in users "I spot rv. Each I igraph section will provide 

some new material is addition to the up-to 1- on the 

network (\ picture. I'm example, tin- section will contain 
audience composition data .1 breakdown "I the audience bj 
age and sex) on a Inn- lUt ,,f syndicated dim shows. M m 
than 20 markets are covered in tlii- list. Future issues will 
carrj new breakdowns ol \.irimi~ data. Hie nexl > 
graph will l><- featured in the 16 February issue oi sponsor 



\>ti, 

iponsored hour da . 

mill <ltn> po(Jr 34 

I 

• hurt hi nil ■ p09c . 33 

ilphabetical /<->.' 

llli ludd ' ■'<! tUtft poqr 42 

ll llll 
position "I hl"i 1 poqc 48 



1. NETWORK PROGRAM PROFILE 

AVERAGE COST OF PROGRAMING BY TYPES 



Cost Number 


Cost Number 


Cost 


Number 


Coif N umber 


Hour drama 
559,000 12 


Half-limir drama 

$34,875 16 


* 
$37,177 


17 


$61 333 9 


Half-hour comedy-var. 
$39,375 6 


Vdventure 

$34,055 18 


Quia 

$27,334 


15 


$8911* 9 



MVr wttfe ol Bti ll pwi; iKher program! are onc*-weeklT 



NUMBER OF SPONSORED HOURS: LIVE AND FILM 

Daytime Nighttime 



Network 


Sponsored 
hours 


°o live 


°o film 


ABC 


11.75 


8.5 


91.5 


CBS 


34.92 


92.8 


7.2 


NBC 


18.15 


87.6 





Network 


Sponsored 
hours 


°0 live 


° film 


ABC 


21 75 


« 




CBS 


27 25 


523 




NBC 


24 667 


33 3 

■ 



! • i-tiinxt* In <•»!<• 



sponsor • 1') .1 wi \k\ L957 






2. NETWORK SHOW COST-PER- 1,000 



Cost-per-1,000 charts below provide an efficiencj comparison for the top 10 might- 
time and the top 10 weekday programs during the two weeks ending 8 December 
1956. Ratings shown are A. C. Nielsen (total audience basis). Time costs are 
from SRDS with standard discounts as computed by .\ielsen. Talent costs are 
sponsor estimates. Top 25 network shows according to ARB are on page at right. 



Cost-per-1,000 homes per commercial minute for top lO nighttime programs 



$3.25 
$3.00 
$2.75 
$2.50 
$2.25 
$2.00 
$1.75 
$1.50 
$1.25 




SI .76 



$1.73 






$2.01 



$2.61 



$2.53 



$2.02 



$1.91 



$1.92 



$2.30 



$3.02 



1 



8 



10 



Ed I Love G.E. Perry Jackie Disney- Hitchcock S64.000 Steve 

Sullivan Lucy Theater Corao (ilea-on land Presents Question Allen 

50.2 rating 48.7 rating 44.7 rating 41.7 rating 41.0 rating 40.7 rating 40.4 rating 39.0 rating 39.0 rating 37.9 rating 



Sports 
Cavalcade 



Cost-per-1,000 homes per commercial minute for top lO week day prograi 



$2.25 
$2.00 
$1.75 
$1.50 
$1.25 
$1.00 
$0.75 
$0.50 




$0.68 



$0.71 

I 



$1.00 



$0.89 

I I 



$1.25 



$1.27 



$1.39 



$1.70 



$1.68 



$1.57 



1 



8 



10 



Mickey Mouse Mickey Mouse Mickey Mouse MickeyMouse Queenfora Guiding Search for Strike It Queenfora V.Godfrey 

Club (5:30) Club (5:45) Club (5:15) Club (5:00) Day (4:30) Light Tomorrow Rich Day (4:15) Time (11:15 

25.3 rating 23.8 rating 19.9rating 16.6 rating 13.2 rating 12.3 rating 11.4 rating 11.2 rating 11.2 rating 11.1 ratio! 

1 I v. ,. itidlena foi two weeks ending 8 December 



TOP 25: ARB 





Ratin 


B 






1. 


1 Love 1 iic \ 






49.0 


2. 


1 ,1 Sullivan 






45.8 


3 


164,000 (,>u. -linn 






41.7 


4. 


'l nil I'.i 1 YoUl 1 il' 

Perrj < '"in,, 






38.4 


5. 






36.8 


6. 


\\ kit- \l\ Line 






36.6 


7. 


|. II k l>l'llll\ 






35.8 


8. 


Ufred Hitchcock 






35.2 


9. 


1 Hsne) Lin, 1 






35.1 


10. 


I've ( ., >t \ Seci el 






35.0 


11. 


G 1 1 lii.ii i ,' 






34.5 


12. 


164,000 < hallenge 

1 ,i--i, 






33.7 


13. 






33.5 


14. 


Red Skelton 

I | \\ | I'll, 'I' \\ flk 




33.3 


15. 






33.0 


16. 


Jackie < Reason 






32.8 


17. 


Talent >, ,>ii(- 




32.4 


18. 


^ Mm Hit Parade 






32.2 


19. 


December Bride 






32.0 


19. 


People \if lunn\ 






32.0 


21. 


Person t" Person 






31.5 


22. 


1 i nit- Ford 






31.0 


23. 


Robin II 1 






30.2 


24. 


1 'i asrne) 






30.0 


25. 


Climax 






29.2 


Audience Compo 


sit 


ion 






M 


w 


c 


1. 


1 Love l.in \ 


29% 


43% 28% 


2. 


1 il Sullivan 


35 


43 


22 


3. 


-(.l.iiiiu Question 


37 


51 


12 


4. 


^ "ii Bet ^ "in I. ifi 


36 


47 


17 


5. 


Peri) ("in,, 


32 


43 


25 


6. 


\\ hat's \K Line 


40 


51 


9 


7. 


Jack Benn) 


35 


38 


27 


8. 


Ufred Hitchcock 


43 


42 


15 


9. 


Disnej land 


21 


22 


57 


10. 


I've Got \ Se< rel 


35 


50 


15 


11. 


• ■ 1 rheatre 


40 


41 


19 


12. 


164,000 Challenge 


33 


57 


10 


13. 


1 assie 


25 


31 


44 


14. 


Red Skelton 


37 


47 


16 


15. 


1 aw rence \\ flk 


37 


46 


17 


16. 


Jackie ( lleason 


32 


38 


30 


17. 


lalfnt >< "ill- 


33 


48 


19 


18. 


^ our Hit Parade 


36 


44 


20 


19. 


December Bride 


29 


43 


28 


19. 


People \if lunin 


31 


41 


28 


21. 


Person (•• Person 


37 


52 


1 1 


22. 


Ernie Ford 


37 


45 


18 


23. 


Robin HimmI 


25 


28 


47 


24. 


Dragnet 


34 


41 


25 


25. 


Climax 


36 


47 


18 


.•Pecetv ttontl network 


pro«T»m« 




SPONSOR • ]') .1 \\l 


u;\ 


957 





"The service with the most su/bscr//;, 

LARGEST SAMPLING OUTSIDE U S CENSUS 



low accurate is ani rating?* 



Write for your 

FREE COPY 

of this 

informative booklet 

Condensed for quick reading 
here arc facts and figures for 
questions that more and more 
TV and Radio executives and 
clients arc asking as ad> 
ing expenditures zoom For 
example 

How accurate is a ratin. 
a rating by any method* How 
about standard error in relation 
to sample size- 1 

How do TV and other media 
compare for audience interest' 

How accurate is personal 
interviewing' How does it stack 
up with other methods' 

Why do Uncle Sam fore 
most researchers leading ad 
vertisers and agencies insist on 
door bell ringing for their top 
research' 





l/iturri 






* * * 

Questions like these and many more arc answered in this stimulating 
thought-provoking little booklet One of its manv timely suggestions 
may start a whole train of construcfr.c new thinking And vou II ap 
preciate why Pulse continues to extend its lead as the service with 
the most subscribers More than 175 markets listed We added over 
50 for TV in 56 — Pulse s biggest year yet Remember — your copy is 
free Write, or phone judson 6-3316. 

This month throughout the U.S., 150,000 homes are 
being interviewed for next month's "U.S. Pulse TV" 

$ 

\ TIRVIEWS 
cm ait 

HOME 




RURAL 




AND URBAN COVERAGE 



PULSE, Inc., 730 Fifth h A 19 

Telephone: Jud 

\\ ll>- IM.IH- i||MIIH» Hill I >\ tun *IB"I»R 1 







3. NIGHTTIME 



COM P A to 



-EC 



SUNDAY 

CBS NBC 



AEC 



MONDAY 

CBS 



NBC 



ABC 



TUESDAY 

CBS 



NBC 



Meet TV; 
Telephone Time **■» v 







: 5wef' 



: : . : :£:•> 









-sked for It 



Lassie 

■ . - - - . ■ 



Lancers 



Kukla 

: : 

■: I Bkac- Ee-aj 



• . ■ 

B Ollie 

- : - E t- i - -: 



T ■:.. T: • 

P r .^ alt Raggtes of Red! 
"*-») a^~ Ithaca 



John Daly News ° " : 

itahaB 



- ■':--, ..a: 



"~ . t-i.. 



= : : :.---:. 

p.i ifi raiiaa 



i >t. .. ■ i Ha 



Nat King Cole 



'. = -; 
Sa It-Pa I i - 



Ba 5: --■-: 



_ . _ Joaathaa Water* 
Naaws Hot Taw; l^-Ho-. 



•.;-: 



£: :. .:- 
Amateur Hour Uacaha ' 



lercaai Bkan 
- 



Da — y Thomas Barms & Allea 
• . - . - . 

GaaarJd 



Sir I a a c elot 
Aaaa Baa ■■ 

'- -- • ' ■ 
3 »ii 



C:-' :" 
Jaaaaa ..j- 



Phil Silvers 

R ». Bffaalat 
J. B. WIIUaaB 



: r ;.-;• : 




- Ed Sullivan 



Steve Allea 



: ■;••:-: 



LaMai 



- . 

: 
- 



~ :• :: : 
: AG 



:..._ ... 



Noah s Art 

Lat: 



C E. Theatre 

• . r , ... . Gel E:*c*..'-; 



Tv Playhouse 

aJeaa 

■wts In • 



: -:: ■-=•.- 



pIg It*" '- :- 

13 -k- 



: ■ :• ; - ---: • 



To Tell The :-; *.- = - 

" - - • - P*G 



I :: : Z 



2 — : - i 



Hitchcock 



Cfce- 



Welk Top Tunes 

•. . . " •• 

Data r gnaaaal 



Dec Bride 
Gen Foods 



= ::• 

1»:3»> 



Theatre 

. . : -. : 



= ;: :• : •:- 
Pal Ma i.: 

- 



Circle Theatre 



Ford 1 



- - : - ■ 



55- :■:■: 

P. Lor 



P*G 
Hall of Faaae 





-: . ":: "- 



I-.: : :-: 



;... .,...-._.. 



at- s 



Si- ::: 



■ = ::• - .- -• 



: « : - ! 



What's My Line 

. Racd 



S: -;- : ;-. :: 



: - - : : : - : 



Year Wife 
u - 1 



Break the Baak 



DAYTIME Programing from 7:00-10:00 a.m. on these page 



There are no 



network shows 
on Sunday 



-... v . — . 



-... >,,....- 



- : : : • 

' 
: BEtk 



-::;■ 



'.::: 









"::: 



morning from 
7:00 to 10:00 



Z : : ■ « •- - 1 3 • : : 



" : : : ■ 



Z : : ■ ' ■ 



"::;. 



An dxplanation of 






"::;. 



:;:• 



" : : : . 



the material in the network tv 

Comparagraph will be fourd 
on pages 40, 41 



A G R A P H 



19 JAN. - 15 FEB 



EDNESDAY 

CBS NBC 



{dwJ'.H 



-- 



net Service 
Edwards 



.ant Step 



Eddie Fisher 
ola all 

IManlers 



News 
111 MiIm 



■ 



ur Godfrey 

nut 



rty contd 1 



Hiram Holhdj) 



Father Knows 
Best 

5 



Millionaire 
CMgatr 



Kraft Theatre 



THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



D Edwjrdt 



JCukTa Fran 
& Oil,.- 

|ohn DjI> New! 
Q«nJ cigar 



No net nnrict 



D Edwjrdt 
hall 



Lone Ringer 

"Hi tit 



Sgt Preston 

yuak- 



Dinah Shore 



News 



Circus Time 
partie 



Circus Time 



Bob Cummings You Bet Yr Lite 

•• alt 
u i K 



Climax 



Dragnet 



Wire Service 
It .1 R 



Climax 



People's Choice 

Ul l'Ali 



ABC 



FRIDAY 

CBS 



NBC 



D Edwards 



Fran 

& 011,.- 

lohn DjIv News 



Rm Tin Ti 



No net service 



D Edwards 



Clock 
II I: 



Eddie fiihn 



Jim Bowi* 

West Point 



Crossroads 



Zanc Crey 



Blond, f 



Lite '• 



Tr.asure Hunt M ' A d'ms & E« 
It J l: 






On Trial 



SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



Is 



Famc- 



k* Ckxk 



► - •. ■ | A • 



-leave" 



film » 



Film Festival |ack,t Cteaton 



Lawrence Wtlk CjU Storm 

Raaan 



Cot A Secret 



Kraft Theatre 



Wire Service 

Miller llrrulng 

alt suit 



Playhouse 90 

r alt 



Ford Show 



The Vis, P,J »S,°"«« °' 



Big Sfory 
Cheiry Show 



- [« Welk 






Steel Hr 
■ka 10 in 



« Cent-Fox Hr 
• hs Electric 

• '111 



This Is 

Your Life 

PAG 



Air Time 
suit 



57 



No net service 



Playhouse 90 

Rocison alt 
Brlilol-Mjen 



Lux Theatre 

1-^ver Broa 

(10-11) 



Playhouse 90 
Philip Morris 
alt Amer Gas 



Lux Theatre 



Ray Anthony 
(10 111 



Ray Anthony 



Line-Up 



Person to Person 

I alt 1 



Cavalcade of 
Sports 



Red Barber 



Ozark |ubile« 



Cunsmekt 



_ You re On Your 

Ozark lubilrc Own 

■ • 



Cm Cocwl 



M,t »a.a<S. 
Aa»- 






Programing from 10:00 a.m 


. to 6:00 p.m. 


will be 


found on pages 40. 4-1 




>od Morning 
aortic 


Today 
partie 




Cood Morning 

• - 

panic 


Today 
(7-») 
partie 




Cood Morning 
partie 


Today 

<:-♦> 

partie 










tod Morning 

- 


Today 




Cood Morning 


Today 




Cood Morning To <i" 








apt Kangaroo 
(»-») 
Mrtie 


Today 




Capt Kangaroo 
(8-9) 
partie 


Today 




Capt Kangaroo 
Today 

partie 


Today 








apt Kangaroo 


Today 




Capt Kangaroo 

Today 




Capt Kangaroo Today 




























-» 




















Caot Kangaroo 

♦ 3»1# J«l 
... . 

i. :-• 





























3. 



'£ 



DAYTIME 



continued . . . 



C O 




P A I 



ABC 



SUNDAY 

CBS 



NBC 



ABC 



MONDAY 

CBS NBC 



TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



Lamp Unto My 

Feet 

•uit 



Carry Moore 
Campbi 

alt sust 



Home 
(10-11) 



Carry Moore 
Hoover 



Home 
panic 



Look Up & Live 
■uit 



Arthur Codfrey 

I'.rawU 

Stand Brands 



Presidential 

Inauguration 

11 :; 1 21 only) 



Arthur Codfrey 
Scott Paper 



Home 



U.N. in Action 
■lilt 



Presidential 
Inauguration 
(11-3. 1 






Bristol-Myers 



Price Is Right 



Kellogg 
Pillsbury 



Price Is Right 

sust 



Camera Three 
sust 



Strike It Rich 
Colgate 

Presidential 

Inauguration 

(11:30-4, 1/21) 



Truth or 
Consequences 



Strike It Rich 
Colgate 



Truth or 
Consequences 



Let's Take Trip 

sust 



Valiant Lady 
Brands 



Love of Life 
Amer i 1 1 nut* Prod 



Tic Tac Dough 
sust 



Tonl alt sust 



Valiant Lady 
Wesson Oil 

Love of Life 
me Prod 



Tic Tac Dough 

Sweets Co alt 

sust 



Wild Bill Hickok 
Kellogg 



Search for 

Tomorrow 

P&G 



It Could Be You 

sust 



Search for 

Tomorrow 

P&G 



It Could Be Yo 

SU-t 



Cuiding Light 
P&G 



Anier Ilome Prod 



Cuiding Light 
P&G 



Alberto Culver 
Lehn & Pink 



Heckle jecklc 

Sweet* Co. alt 

sust 



News 
(1-1:10) sust 



No net service 



Stand Up & Be 

Counted 
sust 



No net service 



Frontiers of 
Faith 

sust 



As the World 
Turns 
P&G 



No net service 



News 

(1-1:10) sust 

Stand Up & Be 
Counted 

sust 



No net service 



As the World 

Turns 

sust 



No net service 



No net service 



No net servict 



NBC Opera 

(2-4. 2/10 only 

sust 



Youth Wants 
The Last Word To Know 

sust sust alt 

Amer Forum 
sust 



Our Miss Brooks 
sust 



No net service 



Our Miss Brooks 

Best Foods 

alt sust 



No net service 



Art Linkletter 
Stand Brands 



Campbell Soup 



Tenn Ernie 

P&G 

Swift alt Brown 

& Williamson 



Art Linkletter 

Kellogg 

Pillsbury 



Tenn Ernie 
P&G 

Stand Brands 



Face The Nation 
sust 



Outlook 
sust 



Afternoon Film 
Festival 

(3-4:30) 
panic 



Big Payoff 
Colgate 



Matinee 

(3-4) 
partlc 



Afternoon Film 
Festival 
(3-4:30) 
partic 



Big Payoff 
sust 



Matinee 
(3-4) 

panic 



|ohns Hopkins 
File 7 



Sunday News 



Zoo Parade 

Mutual of 

Omaha 

alt sust 



Afternoon Film 
Festival 



Bob Crosby 

sust 
Brown & Wmson 
alt Mentholatum 



Matinee 



Afternoon Fil 
Festival 



Bob Crosbv 
Wesson Oil 



Matinee 



College News 

Conference 

sust 



Odyssey 
sust 



Wide Wide Wor 

(alt wks 4-5:30 

Gen Motors 



" Afternoon Film 
Festival 



Brighter Day 
P&G 



Secret Storm 
Amer Home Prod 



Queen for a Da 

Amer Home Proc 

Ton! alt Brown 

& Williamson 



Afternoon Film 
Festival 



Brighter Day 
P&G 

Secret Storm 
Amer Home Prod 



Queen for a Da) 
Sandura alt 
Chick of Sea 



Lehn & Fink 
alt Stand Brands 



Medical Horizons 
Clba 



Odyssey 



Wash Square 

all wks 4-5) 

Helen© Curtis 



No net service 



Edge of Night 
P&G 



Modern Romano 

EUSt 



No net service 



Edge of Night 
P&G 



Modern Romanc 
Culver alt 
Sweets Co 



Dean Pike 
sust 



Mama 
sust 

See It Now 

Pan Am 

' 3 only) 



Topper 

(alt wks 5-5:30 

sust 



Mickey Mouse I 
Club 
co-op 
co-op 



Comedy Time 
sust 



Mickey Mouse 
Club 
co-op 



Comedy Time 
sust 



Press Conference 

■ 



Boing Boing 
sust 



Capt Callant 
Heinz 



Coca Cola 

Miles alt 
Minn Mining 



HOW TO USE SPONSOR'S 
W NETWORK TELEVISION 
IPARAGRAPH AND INDEX 



The network schedule on this and preceding pages I 38, 39) 
includes regularly scheduled programing on the air between 
19 January and 15 February (with possible exception of 
changes made by the networks after presstime). Irregularly 
scheduled programs to appear during this period are listed 
as well, with air dates. The only regularly scheduled pro- 
grams not listed are as follows: Tonight, NBC, 11:30-12:30 



I G R A P H 



19 JAN. - 15 FEB 



j. 



INESDAY 
S NBC 



Home 



:odfrcy 

iVllllarns 



Price Is Right 



Truth or 
It Rich Consequences 
til* 



lUit 



t Lady 

Mllli Tic Tac Dough 

— mil 

if Life 

" ♦«■ It Could Be You 

orrow lul t 

so 



- llrown A Wimon 
( L'K ht ill lust 

M 



THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



C.lrry Moore 

ill luit 



Arthur Godfrey 



Home 



Home 



K.-ll. || 
I 



Stnk, It Rich 
.ate 



Price Is Right 
nut 



Truth or 
Consequences 

■uil 



Valiant Lady 

Tnnl lit 

Loye of I I 



Tic Tic Dough 



Search for 

Tomorrow 

PAO 



It Could B Vol 

• all alt 

suit 



Cui.lim; Llfcht 
PAG 



nniio 



ABC 



FRIDAY 

CBS 



NIX 



Moore 












Home 



Home 



Price Is Ri|M 



II Rich 



Truth of 
Consequences 



V,i:,„, G3J ■ 



Tic Tjc Dough 



Love i • 

" 



' h tor 
Tomorrow 



It Could Be Yo 



Guiding Light 






SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 















Mr a 



TBA 



■Oft 

jp b Be" No nct st, ' v,cc 

inted 

nt 



.< World 

jrns No net service 

40 



News 
(1-1:10) mil 

Stjnrt Up B. 

Counted 

Itllt 



No nct service 



As the World 

Turns 

nitt 



No net scrvici 



News 

Stand Up & Be 
Counted 



As the World 
Turns 
PAO 



No Ml 



No m • 



ss Brooks 

No nct service 
alt lust 



mklcttcr 
#r Bm« 



Tcnn Ernie 
PAO 

Swift lit 
Brown A \Vm*'>n 



Our Miss Brooks 

sunt No nct service 



Nettle alt suit 



Our Miss Brooks 

No n 
Johnion A Johnaon 
alt luil 



Art Linklettcr 
Keltot-g 
PlllsbuiT 



Tcnn Ernie 
PAO 



Art Linklettcr 
Swift 



Tcnn Ernie 

PAG 
Stand Brandt 






No ne> 



'■ 



• S»fViC» | 



! »■ Ult t 



Hockey 



No w 



BaUctball 



Matinee 
(3-4) 
partlc 



Afternoon Film 
Fcstiv.il 
■ mi 
partle 



Big Payoff 
Colgate 



Matinee 
i.l-t) 
partle 



Afternoon Film 
Fcstivil 
I 10) 
partle 



Bin Payoff 



Matinee 
partlr 



Matinee 



Afternoon Film 
Festival 



i Mllli 



Bob Crosby 

T'nl til Swift 

PAO 



Matinee 



Afternoon Film 
Fcstivil 



Bob Crosby 
Swift 



Matinee 



BaUctball 






(titer Day Queen for a Dav 
PAO Bof !« % n 

[at Storm 

i Horn* Prod Com Prod 



Afternoon Film 
Festival 



Brighter Day 
PAO 

Secret Storm 
Amer Home Prod 



Queen for a Da 

Hed.lt-Wlp alt 
Sunklst 



Afternoon Film 
Festival 



Brighter Day _ 

Queen for a Dj t 



Mllei 



Secret Storm 

■ 






Modern Romance 
lint Drue 



No nct service 



Edge of Night ™° 

PAO Modern Romani 



No nct service 



TWO 



Edge of Nisht 

Modern Romances 






- 
Hulo- 



Comedy Time 
suit 



Mickey Mouse 
Club 
co-op 

Plllsbury alt 
Am-Par 



Myers 
Btiitoi-Myui 



Comedy Time 
Kraft 



Mickey Mouse 
Club 



Comedy Time 



Welch all suit 



lej) a " : 



Pen Mills 
Oen Mllli 



p.m.. Monday-Friday, participating sponsorship; Sunday 
Wews Special. CBS. Sunday. 11-11:15 p.m.. sponsored bj 
Pharmaceuticals Inc. 

All times are Eastern Standard. Participating spons 
are not listed because in mam cases they fluctuate. 

Sponsors, co-sponsors and alternate-week sponsors are 
shown along with the names of programs. This i- a cha 



from the pri - I i inted in yellow and 
black i which includi 

nation. !hi« .i.it.i • m alpha- 
betical Listing of .il! network t\ pn 

The word "last" in the Comp.i i boxes 

with a date beside it indicates that it i» the last time a 

-•■[ ••! tin- program will he seen in that time period. 



4. ALPHABETICAL PROGRAM INDEX 



Sponsored Nighttime Network Programs 6-11 p.m. 



PROGRAM 


COST 


NET 


TYPE 


TIME. ORIG. 


SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 




Steve Allen Show 


S 63,000 


NBC 


Var (L) 


Su 8-9pm, NY 


Brown & Williamson, Bates; Jergens, Orr; U. S. Time (1/27, 












2/10), Peck; Vitamin Corp (1,20), BBDO 




Amateur Hour 


23,000 


ABC 


Var (L) 


Su 7:30-9pm, NY 


Pharmaceuticals, Kletter 




Ray Anthony Show 


17,000 


ABC 


Music (L) 


F 10-1 Ipm 


Plymouth, Grant 




♦Red Barber's ( lornei 


3,000 


NBC 


Sport (L) 


F 10:45-1 Ipm, NY 


State Farm Ins, NLB 




Beat the Clock 


18,000 


CBS 


Quiz (L) 


Sa 7-7:30pm, NY 
F 7:30-8pm sts 2/8 


Hazel Bishop, Spector 




Jack Benny 


65,000 


CBS 


Comedy (F) 


alt Su 7:30-8pm 


Amer Tobacco, BBDO 




Big Story 


33,000 


NBC 


Drama (L&F) 


F 9:30-1 0pm, NYt 


Amer Tobacco, SSCB; Vicks, BBDO 




Big Surprise 


33,000 


NBC 


Quii (L) 


Tu 8-8:30pm, NY 


Purex, W&G; Speidel, NCK 




Blondie 


37,500 


NBC 


Sit Com (F) 


F 8-8:30pm 


Nestle, B. Houston; Toni, Tatham-Laird, C. E. Frank 




Bold Journey 


8,000 


ABC 


Adv (F) 


M 7:30-8pm 


Ralston Purina, GBB 




Jim Bowie 


32,000 


ABC 


Adv (F) 


F 8-8:30pm 


Amer Chicle, Bates; Chesebrough-Ponds, Mc-E 




♦Break the Bank 


31,000 


NBC 


Quiz (L) 


Tu 10:30-1 Ipm, NY 


Lanolin Plus, Seeds 




Broken Arrow 


31,000 


ABC 


Adv (F) 


Tu 9-9:30pm 


Gen Elect, Y&R; Miles, Wade 




The Brothers 


39,000 


CBS 


Sit Com (F) 


Tu 8:30-9pm 


P&G, Burnett; Shaeffer, Seeds 




Buccaneers 


24.000 


CBS 


Adv (F) 


Sa 7:30-8pm 


Sylvania, JWT 




Burns & Allen 


33,000 


CBS 


Sit Com (F) 


M 8-8:30pm 


Carnation, Wasey; Goodrich, BBDO 




Caesar's Hour 


114,000 


NBC 


Var (L) 


Sa 9-IOpm, NYt 


Babbitt, DFS; Benrus (2/2), L&N; Knomark, Mogul 
Oats, NLB: Wesson Oil, Fitzgerald 


Quaker 


Cavalcade of Sports 


35.000 


NBC 


Sport (L) 


F lOpm-concI, Var 


Gillette, Maxon 




Cheyenne 


90 000 


ABC 


Adv (F) 


alt Tu 7:30-8:30pm 


Gen Elect, Y&R, BBDO & Grey 




Circle Theatre 


40,000 


NBC 


Drama (L) 


alt Tu 9:30-10:30 

pm, NY 
Su 7:30-8pm 


Armstrong Cork, BBDO 




Circus Boy 


34,000 


NBC 


Adv (F) 


Reynolds Alum, Clinton E. Frank, Buchanan 




Climax 


55,000 


CBS 


Drama (L) 


Th8:30-9:30pm,HY 


Chrysler, Mc-E 




Nat kin*; 1 ole 


14,000 


NBC 


Music (L) 


M 7:30-7:45pm,NY 


Carter, SSCB 




* Perry Como 


108,000 


NBC 


Var (L) 


Sa 8-9pm, NY 


Gold Seal, North; Kleenex, FCB; Noxzema, SSCB; RCA, 












K&E; S&H Stamps, SSCB; Sunbeam, Perrin-Paus 




Conflict 


90,000 


ABC 


Drama (F) 


alt Tu 7:30-8:30pm 


Chesebrough-Ponds, JWT & Mc-E 




Crossroads 


31,000 


ABC 


Drama (F) 


F 8:30-9pm 


Chevrolet, Camp-Ewald 




Bob Cummings Show 


36 000 


CBS 


Sit Com (F) 


Th 8-8:30pm 


Colgate, Brown; R. J. Reynolds, Esty 




John Daly News 


6 000 t 


ABC 


News (L) 


M-F 7:15-7:30 NY 


General Cigar, Y&R 




December Bride 


28 000 


CBS 


Sit Com (F) 


M 9:30-l0pm 


Gen Foods, B&B 




Disneyland 


75,000 


ABC 


Misc (F) 


W 7:30-8:30 pm 


Amer. Motors, BFSD & Geyer; Amer Dairy, Camp 
Derby, Mc-E 


Mithun; 


Do You Trust Wife 


35,000 


CBS 


Quiz (F) 


Tu 10:30-11 pm 


L&M, DFS 




Dragnet 


37,000 


NBC 


Mys (F) 


Th 8:30-9pm 


L&M, Mc-E; Schick, W&L 




DuPont Theatre 


37,000 


ABC 


Drama (F) 


Tu 9:30-1 Opm 


DuPont, BBDO 




Wyatt Earp 


30,000 


ABC 


Adv (F) 


Tu 8:30-9pm 


Gen Mills, DFS; P&G, Compton 




Doug Edwards News 


9,500^t 


CBS 


News (L&F) 


M-F 7:15-7:30 & 
6:45-7pm, NY 


Whitehall, Bates; 1 seg & 2 alt segs open 




Father Knows Best 


38,000 


NBC 


Sit Com (F) 


W 8:30-9pm 


Scott Paper, JWT 




Eddie Fisher 


20,000 


NBC 


Music (L) 


W&F 7:30-7:45 HY 


Coca Cola, Mc-E; Planters, Goodkind, Joice & 
(ev 4th show alt W&F) 


Morgan 


Ford Show 


33,000 


NBC 


Var (L) 


Th 9:30-l0pm, HY 


Ford, JWT 




Ford Theatre 


36,000 


ABC 


Drama (F) 


W 9:30-IOpm 


Ford, JWT 




G.E. Theatre 


45,000 


CBS 


Drama (F) 


Su 9-9:30, HY&NY 


Gen Elect, BBDO 




Giant Step 
Jackie Gleason 


23,000 


CBS 


Quiz (L) 


W 7:30-8pm, NY 


Gen Mills, BBDO 




102,500 


CBS 


Var (L) 


Sa 8-9pm, NY 


Bulova, Mc-E; P. Lorillard, L&N 




Godfrey's Scouts 
*Arthur Godfrey Time 


28,000 


CBS 


Var (L) 


M 8:30-9pm, NY 


Lipton, Y&R; Toni, North 




38,000 


CBS 


Var (L) 


W 8-9pm, NY 


Bristol-Myers, Y&R; Kellogg, Burnett; Pillsbury, 


Burnett; 












1 alt seg open 




George Gobel 
Gunsmoke 


45,000 


NBC 


Comedy (L) 


Sa IO-IO:30pm,HYt 


Armour, FCB; Pet Milk, Gardener 




38,000 


CBS 


Adv (F) 


Sa I0-I0:30pm 


L&M, DFS; Sperry Rand (l wk in 4), Y&R 




Hey Jeannie 
Hitchcock Presents 


41,000 
34,000 


CBS 
CBS 


Sit Com (F) 
Mys (F) 


Sa 9:30-l0pm 
Su 9:30-l0pm 


P&G, Compton; L&M (2/9 start), Mc-E 
Bristol-Myers, Y&R 




Hiram Hollidav 


42,000 


NBC 


Adv (F) 


W 8-8:30pm 


Gen Foods, Y&R 




Robin Hood 


28,000 


CBS 


Adv (F) 


M 7:30-8pm 


Johnson & Johnson, Y&R; Wildroot, BBDO 




I Love Lucy 


45,000 


CBS 


Sit Com (F) 


M 9-9:30pm 


Gen Foods, Y&R; P&G, Grey 




I've Got a Secret 


24,000 


CBS 


Quiz (L) 


W 9:30-l0pm 


R. J. Reynolds, Esty 




Kaiser Alum. Hour 


58,000 


NBC 


Drama (L) 


alt Tu 9:30-10:30 
pm, NY & HY 


Kaiser Alum, Y&R 




♦Kraft Tv Theatre 


34,000 


NBC 


Drama (L) 


W 9-IOpm, NY 


Kraft. JWT 




Kukla, Fran & OUie 




ABC 


Juv (L) 


M-F 7-7:l5pm, Chi 


Gordon Bkng, Ayer; & co-op 




Lassie 


34,000 


CBS 


Adv (L) 


Su 7-7:30pm 


Campbell Soup, BBDO 




Life of Riley 


32,000 


NBC 


Sit Com (F) 


F 8:30-9pm 


Gulf Oil, Y&R 




Line-Up 


31,000 


CBS 


Mys (F) 


F I0-I0:30pm 


Brown & Wm'son, Bates; P&G, Y&R 




Lone Ranger 


24,000 


ABC 


Adv (F) 


Th 7:30-8pm 


Gen Mills, DFS; Swift, Mc-E 




♦Lux Video Theatre 


43,000 


NBC 


Drama (L) 


Th 10-llpm, HY 


Lever Bros, JWT 




Meet the Press 


7,500 


NBC 


Int (L) 


Su 6-6:30pm, NY 


Johns Manville, JWT; alt wks open 




Millionaire 


32,000 


CBS 


Drama (F) 


W 9-9:30pm 


Colgate, Bates 




♦Robert Montgomery 


52,000 


NBC 


Drama (L) 


M 9:30-10:30, NY 


S. C. Johnson, NLB; Mennen Co, Grey (1/28 start) 




Mr. Adams & Eve 


41,000 


CBS 


Sit Com (F) 


F 9-9:30pm 


Colgate, L&N; R. J. Reynolds, Esty 




My Friend Flicka 


37,000 


CBS 


Adv (F) 


F 7:30-8 


Colgate, L&N, (last show 2/1) 




me that Tune 


23,000 


CBS 


Quiz (L) 


Tu 7:30-8pm, NY 


Kellogg, Burnett; Whitehall, Bates 





♦Color show, (L) Live, (P) Film. t3 weeks in 4, ttCost is per segment. List d oes not include sustaining, participating or co-op programs — see chart. Costs 
refer to average show costs including talent and production. They are gross (incl ude 15% agency commission). They do not include commercials or time charges. 
■■•k in I. This lit ,'.riod of 19 Jan. thru 15 Feb. 



//*&«> &/ 




get aboard 

the "Big 5" 

on the NTH ' tower 

n hedules arc filling up 
(no m onderl) but we < an 
make you < omfortable 

Now! More coverage, impi 
picture tor 1,000,1 con- 
tented consumers! Maximum 
Power! 

You can cover more of Wiscon- 
sin with Channel 5, Green Bay. 

The onl\ station completely 
and satisfactorily blanketing 
the famous industrial-agricultural 
counties of Wisconsin from 
Sheboygan to Upper Michigan 
. . . from Stevens Point to 
1 ake Michigan. 

Where annual retail sales top 
a billion' Where drug si 
sales exceed 2 1 : million! And 
lood sales are more than 
250 million' 

Introductory Low Rates 
Phone or Wire 




"Nearest to Heaven 1 highest antenna 

,1165 ft. above average terrain) in 5 state area 




...or ask HEADLEY-REED 
to show you that WFR\ '-TV 

Fact Book 



SPONSOR 



19 jam \k\ 1957 



43 





IMMORTAL 
STORIES OF 
ADVENTURE J 

by 

JACK 
ONDON 



SOLD IN SO MARKETS 
TO 4 REGIONAL SPONSORS 

STANDARD OIL OF CALIFORNIA • D-X SDNRAY OIL GO. • STROH RREWERY CO. • PEARL BREWING CO. 



STILL AVAILABLE IN THE EAST ACT 

And some areas in the South and Midwest 

Ready For The Air in February 



NOW! 





% FILMS 



460 PARK AVENUE. AT 57TH STREET NEW YORK 2 2. NY M U P P A Y HILL 85365 



PROGRAM 



Navy Log 
NBC News 



♦Noah's Ark 
Omnibus 
On Trial 
Ozark Jubilee 
Ozzie & Harriet 
People Are Funny 
People's Choice 
Person to Person 
Pla\ house 90 



Private Secretary 

Kin Tin Tin 

Roy Rogers 

77th Bengal Lancers 

Phil Silvers Show 

Sir Lancelot 
Sgt. Preston 
* Dinah Shore 
$64,000 Challenge 
$64,000 Question 
Red Skelton 
Stanley 

Gale Storm Show 
Studio One 
Ed Sullivan Show 
Sunday News Special 
Telephone Time 
This Is Galen Drake 
This Is Your Life 
Danny Thomas 
To Tell The Truth 
Treasure Hunt 
*TY Playhouse 
20th Century Fox 
Twenty-One 
U.S. Steel Hour 
The , \ i^- 
Voice of Firestone 
Wednesday Fijxht - 
Lawrence Welk 
Welk Top Tunes 
West Point 
What's My Line 
Jonathan Winters 
Wire Service 
Jane Wyman Show 

i nu Are There 
You Asked For It 
You Bet Your Life 
Loretta Young Show 
Your Hit Parade 

^ ou're On Your Own 
Zane Grev Theatre 



32,000 
9,500tt 



38,000 
80,000 
38,000 
18,000 
36,000 
24,000 
34,000 
34,000 
117,000 



36,000 
32,000 
32,000 
41,000 
42,000 

24,000 
32,000 
22,000 
32,000 
32,000 
48,000 
41,000 
39,500 
45,000 
69,000 
9,500 
31,000 
17,250 
52,000 
33,000 
22,000 
21,000 
52,000 
110,000 
30,000 
58,000 
19,500 
24,000 
45,000 
14,500 
16,500 
40,000 
28,000 
12,500 
77,000 
27,000 
37,000 
14,000 
35,000 
40,000 
46,000 
23,000 
41,500 



ABC 
NBC 



NBC 
ABC 
NBC 
ABC 
ABC 
NBC 
NBC 
CBS 
CBS 



CBS 
ABC 
NBC 
NBC 
CBS 

NBC 

CBS 

NBC 

CBS 

CBS 

CBS 

NBC 

CBS 

CBS 

CBS 

CBS 

CBS 

ABC 

NBC 

ABC 

CBS 

ABC 

NBC 

CBS 

NBC 

CBS 

ABC 

ABC 

ABC 

ABC 

ABC 

CBS 

CBS 

NBC 

ABC 

NBC 

CBS 

ABC 

NBC 

NBC 

NBC 

CBS 

CBS 



Drama (F) 
News (L) 



Drama (F) 
Misc (L&F) 
Drama (F) 
Var (L) 
Sit Com (F) 
Misc (F) 
Sit Com (F) 
Int (L) 
Drama (L&F) 



Sit Com (F) 
Adv (F) 
Adv (F) 
Adv (F) 
Sit Com (F) 

Adv (F) 
Adv (F) 
Music (L) 
Quiz (L) 
Quiz (L) 
Comedy (L&F 
Sit Com (L) 
Sit Com (F) 
Drama (L) 
Var (L) 
News (L) 
Drama (F) 
Var (L) 
Docum (L) 
Sit Com (F) 
Quiz (L) 
Quiz (L) 
Drama (L) 
Drama (F) 
Quiz (L) 
Drama (L) 
Drama (F) 
Music (L) 
Sport (L) 
Music (L) 
Var (L) 
Drama (F) 
Quiz (L) 
Comedy (L) 
Drama (F) 
Drama (F) 
Drama (F) 
Misc (F) 
Quiz (F) 
Drama (F) 
Music (L) 
Quiz (L) 
Drama (F) 



TIME. ORIG. 



W 8:30-9pm 
M-F 7:45-8pm, NY 
& Wash 



Tu 8:30-9pm 
Su 9-IO:30pm, 
F 9-9:30pmt 
Sa 10-1 Ipm, 
W 9-9:30pm 
Sa 7:30-8pm 
Th 9-9:30pm 
F 10:30-1 Ipm, 
Th 9:30- 1 Ipm, 



NY 



NY 
HY 



SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 



alt Su 7:30-8pm 
F 7:30-8pm 
Su 6:30-7pm 
Su 7-7:30pm 
Tu 8-8:30pm 

M 8-8:30pmt 

Th 7:30-8pm 

Th 7:30-7:45, HY 

Su I0-I0:30pm, NY 

Tu I0-I0:30pm, NY 

Tu 9:30-IOpm, HY 

M 8:30-9pm, NYt 

Sa 9-9:30pm 

M 10-llpm, NY 

Su 8-9pm, NY 

Su ll-l 1:15pm, NY 

Su 6-6:30pm 

Sa 7-7:30pm 

W |0-I0:30pm, HY 

M 8-8:30pm 

Tu 9-9:30pm, NY 

F 9-9:30pm, NY 

Su 9-IOpm, NYt 

alt W 10-llpm 

M 9-9:30pm, NY 

altW 10-llpm, NY 

F 9:30-IOpm 

M 8:30-9pm, NY 

W lOpm-concI, Var 

Sa 9-IOpm, HY 

M 9:30-10:30, HY 

F 8-8:30pm 

Su 10:30-1 Ipm, N' 

Tu7:30-7:45pm,N' 

Th 9-IOpm 

Tu 9-9:30pm 

Su 6:30-7pm 

Su 7-7:30pm, 

Th 8-8:30pm 

Su I0-I0:30pm 

Sa 10:30-1 Ipm 

Sa 10:30-1 Ipm 

F 8:30-9pm 



HY 



Amer Tobacco, SSCB; U.S. Rubber, F. D. Richards 

American Can (1/28 start), Compton; Miles, Wade; 
Sperry-Rand, Y&R; Studebaker-Packard, B&B; Time-Life, 
Y&R; I seg 

Max Factor, DDB; L&M, Mc-E 

Aluminium, JWT; Union Carbide & Carbon, J. M. Mathes; 

Campbell Soup, BBDO; Lever Bros, BBDO 

Amer Chicle, Bates (alt wks 10-10:30); co-op 10:30-11 

Eastman Kodak, JWT 

R. J. Reynolds, Esty; Toni, North 

Borden, Y&R; P&G, Y&R 

Amer Oil, J. Katz; Hamm, Camp-Mithun; Time-Life, Y&R 

Amer Gas, L&N; Bristol-Myers, BBDO; Philip Morris, Bur- 
nett; Ronson (not 2/14), NCK; Royal Typewriter, (2 14), 
Y&R; Singer, Y&R 

Amer Tob, BBDO 

Nabisco, K&E 

Gen Foods, B&B 

Gen Foods, Y&R 

Amana, Maury, Lee, Marshall; R. J. Reynolds, Esty; J. B. 
Williams (1/29, 2/12 only), JWT 

Amer Home Prod, Bates; Lever Bros, SSCB 

Quaker Oats, WBT 

Chevrolet, Camp-Ewald 

P. Lorillard, Y&R; Revlon, BBDO 

Revlon, BBDO 

S. C. Johnson FCB; Pet Milk, Gardner 

Amer Tobacco, SSCB; Toni, Tatham-Laird 

Nestle, B. Houston; Helene Curtis, Weiss & Geller 

Westinghouse, Mc-E 

Lincoln-Mercury, K&E 

Pharmaceuticals, Kletter 

Bell, Ayer 

Best Foods, Guild, Bascom & Bonfigli 

P&G, B&B 

Armour, FCB; Kimberly-Clark, FCB 

Pharmaceuticals, Kletter 

Mogen David, Weiss & Geller 

Alcoa, Fuller, Smith & Ross; Goodyear, Y&R 

Gen Elec, Y&R 

Pharmaceuticals, Kletter 

U.S. Steel, BBDO 

Sterling Drug, DFS 

Firestone, Sweeney & James 

Mennen, Mc-E; Pabst, Burnett 

Dodge, Grant 

Dodge & Plymouth, Grant 

Gen Foods, B&B 

Helene Curtis, Ludgin; Sperry-Rand, Y&R 

Lewis-Howe, DFS; Vicks, BBDO 

Miller Brewing, Mathiesson; R. J. Reynolds, Esty; 74 sust 

P&G, Compton 

Prudential, Calkins & Holden 

Skippy Peanut Butter, GBB 

DeSoto, BBDO; Toni, North 

P&G, B&B & Compton 

Amer Tobacco, BBDO; Warner Hudnut, SSC&B 
Hazel Bishop, Spector 
Ford, JWT; Gen Foods, B&B 



Spons 


ored D 


ayti 


me Net> 


/vork Prog 


rams 7 a.m. -6 p.m. 


PROGRAM 


COST 


NET 


TYPE 


TIME. ORIG. 


SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 


As the World Turns 


$ 3,000tt 


CBS 


Serial (L) 


M-F l:30-2pm, NY 


P&G, B&B (T & Th sust) 


Basket ball 


20,000tt 


NBC 


Sport (L) 


Sa 2:30-4:30pm, 
var 


Carter, SSCB; Bristol Myers, DCS&S; Brown & Wmson, 
Bates; 1 seg open wkly, 3 segs open alt 


Big Payoff 


6,000tt 


CBS 


Quiz (L) 


M-F 3-3:30pm, NY 


Colgate, Houston (T sust) 


Brighter Day 


10,000 wk 


CBS 


Serial (L) 


M-F 4-4:l5pm, NY 


P&G, Y&R 


Capt. Gallant 


31,000 


NBC 


Adv (F) 


Su 5:30-6pm 


Heinz, Maxon 


Comedy Time 


rerun 


NBC 


Sit Com (F) 


M-F 5-5:30pm 


Kraft, JWT; Pharmco, DCSS; Welch, Rich. K. Manoff; 7 
segs open & 2 alt segs open 


Theatre 


2,500tt 


NBC 


Adv (F) 


Sa 12:30-1:30 


Sweets Co, Eisen; 2 segs open; 4 segs open alt wks 


Bob Crosby 


3,150 


CBS 


Var (L) 


M-F 3:30-4pm, HY 


Best Foods, DFS, Ludgin; Brown & Wmson, Bates; Gen Mills, 
Knox-Reeves; Gerber, D'Arcy; Mentholatum, JWT; P&G, 
Wesson, Fitzgerald; 1 seg 
Compton; SOS, Mc-E; Swift, Mc-E, JWT; Toni, North; 


Edge of Night 


15,000 wk 


CBS 


Serial (L) 


M-F 4:30-5pm, NY 


P&G, B&B 



Bhow, (L) Live, (F) Film, t3 weeks in 1. ttCost is per segment. List docs not include 
to average show costs incln . and production. Tiny arc gross (include 15% agency 

This list covers pi riod ol I 9 - 1 m thru i 5 Feb 



sustaining, participating or co-op programs — see chart. Costs 
commission). They do not include commercials or time charges. 



KPHO-TV 




5 





MBER 




* 



Independent Station 
In the Nation! 




t in SYNDICATED SHOWS 

.7 of TOP 10 



Yes. 6 p.m. to midnight, every night of the week, 
KPHO-TV leads all multi-station markets. (4 or more stations), 
with a 22.1 share of audience ! No. 2 station lias a 17.2; number 
3 station has a 15.0. — LOOK at our position in PHOENIX ! 



st in AFTERNOON AUDIENCES 

(NOON-6:00) M-F 




6 of TOP 7 

Highway Patrol (Fri.) 34.5 

Station B 30.3 

Public Defender 23.9 

Stories of the Century 22.5 
Frontier Doctor 21.0 




Early (5:00-6:00) M-F 



Highway Patrol (Tues.) 21.6 
Science Fiction 20.6 

Station B 20.1 

Amos 'N' Andy 18.7 

Station B 18.7 



and late 



KPHO-TV 5:30-5:45 7.8 

Station B 5:15-5:30 (net). ...7.5 



Station B 5:00-5:15 6.9 

Station C 5:45-6:00 (net). ...4.6 



Late (10:00-10:45) M-F 

KPHO-TV 1 000- 10:15.1 1.4 Station B 10:30-10:45 5.3 

(Only late news programs) 





KPHO-TV 30.0 

Station B 28.3 



Station D 23.4 

Station C 20.2 




0VIES, early an 

0:30-NOON M- 




KPHO-TV 2.0 Station C 1.2 

Late (10:00-SIGNOFF) M-F 
KPHO-TV 7.0 Station D 5 5 



Station C 6.9 



Station B 4.8 




KPHO-TV 400-500 15.8 
Station D 4:30-5:00 2.0 Station C 5:30-6:30 1.0 



M L * 

AND THIS CLOSE V TO 




I 

in LATE EVENING AUDIENCES 



(9:00-12:00) M-F 



Station B 28.1 

KPHO-TV 28.0 



Station C 24.9 

Station D 19.1 

*ARB, Nov. '56 




KPHO-TV 





IN PHOENIX it's KPHO and KPHO-TV represented by The KATZ Agency 

IN OMAHA it's WOW and WOW-TV represented by BLAIR-TV, Inc. 

IN SYRACUSE it's WHEN and WHEN-TV represented by The KATZ Agency 

IN KANSAS CITY it's KCMO and KCMO-TV represented by The KATZ Agency 



Meredith Stations are affiliated with Better Homes and Gardens and Successful Farming Magazines 



Sponsored Daytime Network Programs 7 a.m. -6 p.m. 



PROGRAM 



Fury 

Arthur Godfrey 



Guiding Light 
►Heckle & Jeckle 
1 [ockey 

Howdy Doody 
It Could Be You 



Art Linkletter 



Love of Life 
Lone Ranger 
Medical Horizons 
Mickey Mouse Club 



Mighty Mouse 
Modern Romances 

Garry Moore 



Our Miss Brooks 

Press Conference 
Queen for a Day 



Search for Tomorrow 
Secret Storm 
Strike It Rich 
Texas Rangers 
Tenn Ernie Ford 

Tic Tac Dough 

Valiant Lady 

Wild Bill Hickok 
*Zoo Parade 



33,000 

4,1 so; 



10,000 wk 
6,000 

24,000 
3,000tt 



4,000 



10,000 wk 

18,000 

22,000 
5,040 to 
6,300 tt 



20,000 
2,700tt 

3,600tf 



8,500 
3,000tf 



10,000 wk 
9,500 wk 

15,000 wk 

18,000 
3,500tt 

2,500tt 

10,000 wk 

27,000 
12,500 



NBC 
CBS 



CBS 
CBS 
CBS 
NBC 
NBC 



CBS 



CBS 
CBS 
ABC 
ABC 



CBS 
NBC 



CBS 



CBS 

ABC 
NBC 



CBS 
CBS 
CBS 
CBS 
NBC 

NBC 

CBS 

CBS 

NBC 



Adv (F) 
Var (L) 



Serial (L) 
Juv (F) 
Sport (L) 
Juv (L) 
Quiz (L) 



Var (L) 



Serial (L) 
Adv (F) 
Documn (L) 
Juv (F) 



Juv (F) 
Serial (L) 

Var (L) 



Sit Com (F) 

Int (L) 
Misc (L) 



Serial (L) 
Serial (L) 
Misc (L) 
Adv (F) 
Var (L) 

Quiz (L) 

Serial (L) 

Adv (F) 
Misc (F) 



TIME. ORIG. 



So I I- 1 1:30am 
M-Th 10:30-11:30 
am, NY 



M-F I2:45-Ipm, NY 
Su l-l :30pm 
Sa 2-5 pm, var 
Sa I0-I0:30am, NY 
M-F l2:30-lpm,HY 



M-F 2:30-3pm, HY 



M-F 12:15-30, NY 
Sa l-l:30pm 
Su 4:30-5pm, Var 
M-F 5-6pm 



Sa 10:30-1 lam 
M-F 4:45-5pm, NY 

M-Th I0-I0:30am 
F 10-1 1:30am, NY 



M-F 2-2:30pm 

Su 5:30-6pm, Wash 
M-F 4-4:45pm, HY 



M-F 12:30-45, NY 
M-F 4:15-4:30, NY 
M-F Il:30-I2n, NY 
5a Il:30-I2n 
M-F 2:30-3pm, HY 

M-F I2n-I2:30, NY 

M-F I2n-I2:l5. NY 

Su 1 2:30- 1 pm 
Su 3:30-4pm 



SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 



Gen Foods, B&B; Borden, Y&R 

Amer Home Prod, Y&R; Bristol-Myers, Y&R; Gen Foods, 
Y&R; Kellogg, Burnett; Norwich, B&B; Pillsbury, Burnett; 
Scott Paper, JWT; Sherwin Williams, F&S&R; Simoniz, 
Y&R; Stand Brands, Bates 

P&G, Compton 

Sweets Co., Eisen; Johnson & Johnson, Y&R 

Carling Brewing, Lang, Fisher & Stashower 

Cont Baking, Bates; Sweets Co, Eisen; '/2 open alt wits 

Amer Home Prod, Geyer; Brillo, JWT; Brown & Wm'son, 
Seeds; Alberto Culver, Wade; Gen Foods, FCB; Lehn 
& Fink, Mc-E; Welch, Rich K. Manoff; 4 segs open 

Campbell Soup, Burnett; Kellogg, Burnett; Lever Bros, 
BSDO; Pillsbury, Burnett; Simoniz, Y&R; Stand Brands, 
JWT; Swift, Mc-E 

Amer Home Prod, Bates 

Gen Mills, DFS; Nestle, Mc-E 

Ciba. JWT 

Amer-Paramount, Buchanan; Armour, Tat-Laird; Bristol- 
Myers, DCSS Carnation, Wasey; Coca Cola, McE; Gen 
Mills, Knox Reeves; Mattel, Carson Roberts, Miles, Wade; 
Minn Mining, BBDO; Pillsbury, Burnett; SOS, McE; 8 
segs co-op 

Gen Foods, B&B; Colgate, Bates 

Alberto Culver, Wade; Kraft, JWT; Sterling, DFS; Sweets 
Co, Eisen; I seg open 

Best Foods, DFS, Ludgin; Campbell, Burnett; Gen Motors, 
Campbell-Ewald; Hoover, Burnett; Johnson & Johnson, 
Y&R; Lever Bros, JWT; Nestle, Mc-E; Pittsburgh Plate 
Glass, Maxon; SOS, Mc-E; Staley, R&R; Swift, JWT, 
Mc-E; Toni, North; Yardley, Ayer; I seg & 3 alt segs open 

Best Foods, DFS; Gerber, D'Arcy; Johnson & Johnson, Y&R; 
Nestle, Mc-E; 5 segs open & 5 alt segs open 

Corn Prod, C. L. Miller 

Amer Home Prod, Geyer; Borden, Y&R; Brown & Wm'son, 
Seeds; Chicken of Sea, Wasey; Corn Prod, C. L. Miller; 
Dow, McM-J&A; Lehn & Fink, Mc-E; Mennen, Mc-E; 
Miles, Wade; P&G, Compton; Reddi-Wip, R&R; San- 
dura, Hicks & Griest; Stand Brands, Bates; Sunkist, FCB; 
Toni, North 

P&G, Burnett 

Amer Home Prod, Bates 

Colgate, Bates 

Gen Mills, Tat-Laird; Sweets Co, Eisen 

Brown & Wm'son, Seeds; Miles, Wade; Minute Maid, Bates; 
P&G, B&B; Stand Brands, Bates; Swift, Mc-E 

Kraft, JWT; Mentholatum, JWT; Sweets Co, Eisen 
North; 6 segs & 2 alt segs open 

Gen Mills, DFS; Nestle, Mc-E; Stand Brands, JWT 
Tatham-Laird; Wesson, Fitzgerald 

Kellogg, Burnett 

Mutual of Omaha, Bozell & Jacobs; alt wks open 



Toni, 
Toni, 



Specials and Spectaculars Scheduled for 19 Jan.- 15 Feb. 



PROGRAM 


COST 


NET 


TYPE 


TIME. ORIG. 


SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 


Chevy Show 


$145,000 


NBC 


Comedy (L) 


F 9-10, HY** 


Chevrolet, Camp-Ewald — 1/25 




*Hall of Fame 


200,000 


NBC 


Var (L) 


Su 9-l0:30pm, NY 


Hallmark, FCB— 2/ 10 




* Ernie Kovacs 


once only 


NBC 


Drama (L) 


Sa IO-IO:30pm,NY 


RCA-Whirlpool, K&E; Oldsmobile, Brother— 


1/19 


Presidential Inaugural Balls 


once only 


CBS 


Misc (L) 


M Il:l5pm-I2m, 
Wash 


Maybelline, Gordon Best — 1/21 




* Producers' Showcase 


320,000 


NBC 


Drama- (L) 
Music 


M 8-9:30, NY*» 


RCA-Whirlpool, K&E— 2/4 




*Ruggles of Red Gap 


275,000 


NBC 


Drama- (L) 
Music 
Drama- (L) 


Su 7:30-9pm, NY 


Swift, Mc-E— 2 3 




*Sat Spectacular 


250,000 


NBC 


Sa 9-IOpm, NY** 


RCA-Whirlpool, K&E; Oldsmobile, Brother- 


1/19 








Music 








ll Now 


125,000 


CBS 


Docum (F) 


Su 5:00-6:00pm 


Pan Am, JWT— 2 3 




'Washington Sq. 


125,000 


NBC 


Var (L) 


alt Su 4-5. NY 


Helene Curtis, Ludgin 




Vorld 


195,000 


NBC 


Misc (L) 


alt Su 4-5:30, NY 


Gen Motors, Brother & Camp-Ewald 





*Color show, (L) Live, (F) Film, t3 weeks in 4, ttCost is per segment. List does not include sustaining, participating or coop programs — see chart. Costs 
refer to average show costs including talent and production. They arc gross (inclade 15% agency commission). They do not include commercials or time charges. 
This list covers period of 1!) Jan. thru 15 Feb. 



5. SPOT TELEVISION BASICS 



ippeal of syndicated film Bhowa 
according i<> age, Bex i> indicated 
l>\ audience composition data lor 
101 programs rated in 23 markets 



I he LOO-odd shows listed below comprise nearly li.ilf "I 
the li.ill noui syndicated shows now being distributed. I 
urea show the tudience composition foi each show pei l ,M| 
1 1 ■ . r » i • -— . I he data is Im-<-.I on Pulse ratii 
ki-i> during Novembei 1956 rhe markets include Vtla 
Baltimore, Birmingham, Boston, Buffalo, ' harlotte, < hi< 

< it nati, Cleveland, < olumbus, Dayton, Detroit, I ••- Vn- 

geles, Milwaukee, Minneapolis-St. Paul, New Orleans, New 
York, Philadelphia, Providence, San Francisco-Oakl 
Seattle-Tacoma, St. Louis, Washington, li Bhould I"- noted 
that t • • » t .ill Bhowa are seen in .ill markets. In analyzing 
audience composition data, it Bhould be kepi in mind that, 
although certain Bhowa have pronounced audience appeal t" 
certain .!-<• groups, the time slol has .1 powerful effect in 
determining the audiem >• 1 omposition. \\ liil<- advertisers, ol 
course, pick the time bIoI to gel spe< ifii audiem es, the) • an- 
nol always eel into 1 1 1«- time bIoI thei are interested in. 



Show 



Vmoe 11' \m.I\ 

Vnnie Oaklej 

Badge Tit 

Beulah 

Boston Blai kie 

Brave I agk 

Buffalo Hill Jr. 

( aptain Midnighl 
lebrit} Play] se 

( lhampionship Boh ling 

1 hina ^mitli 

1 I-. " Kill 

( it\ Detw live 

1 odi 

t mitiil.nti.il File 

1 ..1 li-» \ti her, Meet 

1 .Mint of Monte 1 risto 

1 om boj 1 • Men 

1 rosscurrenl 

Crunch and Dea 

Dangerous Assignment 

Dateline Europe 

Death \ alle) l>.i\- 

Doug. Fairbanks Presents 

Dr. 1 hristian 

Dr. Hudson's Set rel Journal 

Ellen Queen 

K-~i> Golden Playl 
I Falron. The 

Federal Men 

Flash Cordon 

Foreign I • jponnaire 
1 Frankie Laine 
I Gem' \nir\- ' •_• Ilr. 

(•'in- \utr\ 1 Hr. 

i -"" : 



Distributor 


Men 


Women 


Teen 


Children 


Totol 


1 1!^ Film 


73 


79 


1 1 


36 


199 


1 BS Film 


41 


56 


16 


89 


202 


NBl Film 


71 


79 


15 


58 


223 


Flamingo 


56 


84 


11 


22 


173 


1 i onomee Tv 


82 


79 


14 


33 


208 


1 11- Film 


56 


47 


1 1 


76 


190 


1 BS Film 


35 


24 


13 


91 


163 


hi .•■111- 


26 


29 


13 


87 


155 


• ■ m- 


71 


95 


11 


26 


203 


\\ alter Sch« immer 


81 


71 


13 


16 


181 


\l \ 


79 


79 


14 


37 


209 


Zh T\ 


56 


41 


16 


84 


197 


Ml \ 1- 


77 


82 


16 


21 


196 


\i:i Film 


77 


77 


12 


21 


187 


Guild 


81 


84 


11 


8 


184 


/IN ft 


52 


80 


17 


50 


199 


1 1'\ 


68 


69 


19 


26 


182 


Flan 1 


42 


36 


19 


82 


179 


ial 


77 


84 


11 


21 


193 


NBl 1\ 


69 


74 


18 


49 


210 


NBC T\ 


83 


89 


13 


19 


204 


Official 


81 


90 


16 


15 


202 


Pacifii 1 oast Borax 


84 


77 


16 


41 


218 


\l!l Film 


74 


96 


18 


15 


203 


/x^ \\ 


74 


89 


1 1 


23 


197 


Ml \ 1 


77 


82 


14 


13 


186 


M'\ 


81 


89 


14 


17 


201 


Official 


73 


86 


9 


26 


194 


\i;< Ti 


83 


86 


15 


13 


197 


\l< \-Tv 


76 


71 


15 


16 


178 


Guild 


68 


69 


14 


77 


228 


IT\ 


71 


52 


12 


62 


177 


GuUd 


59 


79 


19 


29 


186 


l BS Film 


59 


51 


19 


82 


211 


Mi \Tv 


57 


50 


16 


80 


203 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 195' 







Only market place of its kind. Gives programing profile of every 
tv and radio station in the United States and Canada. 
Published each March. Advertising forms close mid February 



RADIO AND TILIVUIOI 




^ buyers' guide 

to station programing 



If you were a timebuyer asked to make up a list of 60 farm stations 
how would you 90 about it 7 If i t were your job to bui Id lists of 
stations featuring farm programing, or sport shows, or negro, news 
of Latin American programing, homemaker shows or other special appeal 
programing where would you turn 7 

If you were asked to make up a list of tv stations on one day's 
notice and needed film and slide requirements of each station; if you 
had to know about likely homemaker shows, farm programs, sportscasts, 
feature film availabilities - what would you do 7 

The busy timebuyer, account executive, and ad manager turn to the 
Buyers' Guide to Station Programing . It works wonders for him. It's 
the only tool enabling him to quickly, accurately and expertly sort 
out the 3.500-plus radio and tv stations of the U.S. and Canada by 
their program characteristics. 

Thr 1957 BUYERS' GUIDE is as basic as your rate card. It's the only 
source of its kind. Your ad in BUYERS' GUIDE, near the programing 
analysis of your own station, will benefit from a year 'round exposure 
before the largest concentration of advertiser-agency readership in 
the trade paper field. BUYERS' GUIDE goes to the full SPONSOR reader 
list of 13.500 circulation. 

Send your reservation in right away. Use the attached order form, 
or wire collect for choice position. Regular rates and frequency 
discounts apply. Advertising deadline is 15 February. Regards. 

Slncerel y , 



Arnold Alpert f 



BOLDFACE LISTING WITHOUT COST 

Along with your ad in the 1957 
BUYERS' GUIDE your station 
will be listed in boldface in 
the master directory. 




SPONSOR SERVICES INC . 40 EAST 49tm ST , NEW YORK 17 N Y 

1957 BUYERS' GUIDE ADVERTISING ORDER FORM 



I'lease reserve following space in the 
1957 BUYERS' GUIDE TO STATION PROGRAMING 



□ full 



$450 



□ half page .... $265 



□ two-third pay . $330 

□ one-third pagi $180 

horizontal (matter directory 



I understand my ad entitles me to boldface listing of my 
station in the master directory at no extra cost. 

NOTE TO CONTRACT ADVERTISERS Bai 

II, applies I I'.I > ERS GUIDE ind PALI i M T9 

□ I prefer placement in Master Directory 

□ I prefer placement in category listings 



Firm 
City^ 



Zone 



Stote 



Name 



TEGORY 

LISTINGS 

RADIO 
Childt 

Clas* 

i and 

' ' MIC 
n Language 

\ merican 

Popular St uric 



TELEVISION 
Far» 
Featur. 

■ cm* 
. i ppeaU 
Sportt 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiniiiiiiiKa 

Show 



lllllllilllllllllllllilllll 
Distributor 



llll!l!!llll!llll!lll!ll!llll!lllll!l!lllll!lli;. . .,„i!li!lll!lllllilli,;,. 



Goldbergs, The 

Grand Ole Opi s 

Greal Gildersleeve 

( .u\ I ombardo 

Headline 

Highway Patrol 

Hopalong Cassidy — % Hr. 

I [opalong < lassid) I II i. 

Hunter, The 

I Led Three Lives 

hitiri Siiii<-I inn 

Inspector Mark Saber 

1 Search Fur Adventure 

I 5p) 

Joe Palooka 

Jungle Jim 

Kit Carson 

Laurel and Hardy 

Liberace 

Life of Riley 

I ife \\ itb Elizabeth 

Life With Father 

Little Rascals 

Lone Wolf 

Long John Silw-i 

Looney Tunes 

Man Called X 

Mr. and Mrs. North 

Mr. District Attorney 

My Hero 

M\ Little Margie 

New Orleans Police Dept. 

Passport To Danger 

Patti Page 

Popeye 

Public Defender 

Racket Squad 

Ramar of The Jungle 

Range Rider 

Ray Milland Show 

Rockc\ Jones, Space Ranger 

Rosemary Cloonej 

Ruggles, The 

San Francisco Beat 

Science Fiction Theatre 

Sheena Queen of The Jungle 

Sheriff of Cochise 

Sherlock Holmes 

Sky King 

Soldiers ol Fortune 

Stage 7 

Stai Performance 

S. Donovan, We c tern Marshal 

Stories "I The Century 

Studio 57 

Stu I- 1 \\ in Show 

Superman 

Susie 

Texas Rasslin' 

Three Musketeers, The 

Victorj \i Sea 

\\ atei front 

Whistler, The 

Wild Bill Hickok 

Your Ml Star Theatre 

Your TV Theatre 



Guild 

Flamingo 

NBC-Tv 

M( \ l\ 

M( \ l\ 
Ziv Tv 

NBC-T\ 

\i;< •|'v 
Tafon 
/i\ l'\ 
NBC-Tv 

I hompson-Koch 
George Bagnall 
Guild 
Guild 

Screen (.cms 

MCA-Tv 

Governor 

Guild 

NBC-Tx 

Guild 

CBS-1\ 

Interstate Tv 

MCA-Tv 

CBS-Tv 

Guild 

Ziv Tv 

Bernard L. Schubert 

Ziv Tv 

Official 

Official 

Minot Tv 

ABC Film 

Oldsmobile 

AAP 

Interstate Tv 

ABC Film 

TPA 

CBS Film 

MCA-Tv 

MCA-Tv 

MCA-Tv 

Tom Corradine 

CBS Film 

Ziv Tv 

ABC Film 

\ I \ 

Guild 

Nabisco 

Ml \-Tv 

TPA 

Official 

NBC Film 
UTS 



m<:\ -Tx 
Official 
Flamingo 
TPA 

Texas K •■ --1 i n " 
VBI Film 
NBC Film 
M(\'l\ 
< BS Film 
Flamingo 
Screen Gems 
Economee Tv 



Kill 



Men 


Women 


Teen 


Children 


Total 




71 


87 


13 


36 


207 


1 


63 


82 


15 


24 


184 


s 


79 


83 


13 


28 


203 


H 


74 


87 


13 


12 


186 


= 


76 


82 


11 


15 


184 


1 


81 


86 


13 


37 


217 


= 


59 


54 


21 


83 


217 




53 


49 


17 


85 


204 




77 


80 


13 


33 


203 




79 


83 


15 


29 


206 




81 


75 


16 


15 


187 




79 


82 


16 


16 


193 




74 


70 


18 


21 


183 




77 


81 


13 


23 


194 




71 


57 


13 


56 


197 




33 


29 


16 


84 


162 


■ 


36 


31 


17 


84 


168 




37 


39 


19 


93 


188 




34 


87 


16 


15 


152 




79 


75 


19 


29 


202 




64 


86 


13 


11 


174 


s 


69 


86 


15 


39 


209 




21 


29 


16 


96 


162 




84 


80 


13 


21 


198 




34 


29 


19 


82 


164 


= 


18 


29 


11 


93 


151 




81 


87 


17 


18 


203 




83 


86 


19 


21 


209 


| 


79 


90 


15 


15 


199 




75 


86 


18 


14 


193 


= 


72 


87 


19 


22 


200 




77 


81 


14 


15 


187 




70 


79 


12 


31 


192 


g 


70 


89 


17 


10 


186 


■ 


35 


31 


16 


91 


173 


J 


80 


84 


16 


13 


193 


1 


84 


80 


15 


12 


191 


= 


30 


28 


18 


92 


168 


1 


57 


41 


17 


84 


199 


1 


75 


81 


13 


14 


183 


= 


53 


51 


16 


55 


175 


= 


70 


86 


16 


17 


189 


= 


24 


80 


10 


30 


144 




81 


85 


13 


21 


200 


= 


76 


61 


19 


23 


179 


l 


41 


40 


16 


80 


177 




74 


66 


13 


49 


202 




77 


71 


18 


25 


191 


= 


40 


43 


19 


85 


187 




71 


69 


14 


31 


185 




75 


89 


17 


7 


188 




73 


86 


9 


26 


194 




50 


36 


18 


85 


189 




70 


82 


15 


24 


191 




73 


86 


16 


19 


194 


= 


72 


83 


14 


14 


183 




26 


30 


19 


91 


166 




56 


82 


11 


23 


172 




64 


63 


16 


35 


178 




74 


76 


15 


48 


213 




76 


70 


19 


13 


178 




81 


84 


16 


15 


196 




84 


82 


16 


14 


196 




55 


34 


19 


83 


191 




54 


84 


13 


29 


180 




72 


90 


11 


19 


192 








'!!!;!lll!!l!ll!!!lllllllllllllllffl 



52 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1').t7 



Talk About Daytime Audience Dominance 

KCR A TV Has 

More Adult Daytime 
Viewers Than All 
Competing Stations 
COMBINED! 





ARB Share of Audience* 
Sign-on to 5 p.m., Monday -Friday 
Daytime Adult Viewing Hours 



t:+#t$#®$Z 






From 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Clear Channel 3 has 
190 quarter-hour "firsts" out of a possible 
200. In Share of Audience, KCRA-TV has 
more than twice that of the second station: 



( Avg. Sets in Use: 15.1 



1 



I 



Sign-on 
To Noon 

KCRA-TV 60.0 

Station "B" 37.7% 
Station "C" 1.3% 

Station "D" 

On Air at 2 p.m. 



Noon 
5 p. m. 

67.2% 

18.0% 

3.1 % 

13.9% 



Avg. Daytime 
Share Audience 



[||||||||^^ 



KCRA-TV has 21.3% more audience than 
the second station in the big Sacramento 
TV Market from Sign-on to Signoff, Sun- 
day through Saturday: 

Total Share 
of Audience 

KCRA-TV 43.8% 

Station "B" 36.1 % 

Station "C 12.9% 

Station "D" 9.2% 



Call Petry for more information about 
The Highest Rated NBC Station in the West 

'All figures from Sacramento Television Audience. ARB: November 15-21, 1956 




SSSSKSS-::: : :: : 

CLEAR 



SERVING 28 NORTHERN CALIFORNIA AND NEVADA COUNTIES 

Sacramento, California 




CHANNEL 



SPONSOR • 1<> .1 \\i UO 195" 






SPONSOR ASKS 




How should you slant commercials to the Canadian market ■■ 



George F. Wyland, creative production 
manager. Cockfield, Brown & Co., Ltd., 

Toronto, Canada 
The question covers a very wide range. 
Slanting a commercial to the Cana- 
dian market may be as simple as 
changing supers announcing the price. 
Speaking of American products in 
general, the price in Canada will be 
higher. Package shots may have to be 
done over again, especially if the prod- 



"Pork 'n Beans 
ended up 




Beans and Pork' 



uct is manufactured in Canadian 
plants. Multiple product commercials 
may include items not available here, 
which must be eliminated. All these 
are mechanical changes. 

Next, government regulations must 
be considered. All broadcast media are 
government controlled and subject to 
very stringent supervision. For exam- 
ple, in the case of premiums offered 
free of charge, no mention of its 
brand-name may be made. All food 
copy must be submitted to the Dept. 
of National Health and Welfare two 
weeks in advance of broadcast, a real 
problem when you try to take Ameri- 
can commercials off the line and the 
copy is subject to change at the last 
minute. The very name of a product. 
though it was in popular idiom, had 
to be changed; Pork 'n Beans ended 
up Beans and Pork, because ingredi- 
ents must be named in the order of 
their relative amount. 

Compliance with regulations ma\ in- 
volve no more than minor changes, or 
an entirel) new copy line. Often the 
Dattern of consumption is very differ- 



ent. Where the objective in the United 
States may be to increase the consump- 
tion of a product by its present users, 
in Canada there are many people who 
must first be persuaded to try it. In a 
case like this, the American commer- 
cials may be of interest to a number of 
Canadian viewers. But the high cost 
of advertising, due to the relatively 
small population spread over a vast 
area requires that each commercial 
minute works double duty. As for 
Canadian commercials, they are usu- 
ally designed to retain interest in spite 
of repetition, because budgets for new 
productions are very limited. 

For this reason we are not quick to 
recommend making our own commer- 
cials, when American material is avail- 
able. They will only have to stand 
comparison with the existing commer- 
cials, usually produced with much big- 
ger budgets. Yet we don't hesitate to 
accept this challenge whenever neces- 
sary. While it is difficult to generalize 
about national characteristics, there 
are some fundamental differences be- 
tween Canada and the United States 
which go beyond a matter of a slant. 
For one thing, we are in a different 
state of economic development, not 
merely a different stage in a similar 
course. Our conservative credit policj 
is an example of the difference in atti- 
tude. It is an attitude more sceptical 
of exaggeration, vet perhaps more re- 
sponsive to straight-forward sell. For 
lack of an equallv well-known example, 
the manner in which the Salk vaccine 
was released and received in each 
countn gives an idea of the difference. 

Last, because it is really a topic all 
its own. I must mention French Cana- 
da. \\ c make c\t'i\ effort to link Eng- 
lish and French advertising campaigns. 
But much is not suitable for both 
languages nor effective in both situa- 
tions. We draw on a complete staff 



in Montreal to slant our material to 
their situation, or whenever necessary 
to create fresh ideas. Those are the 
lifeblood of advertising anvwhere. 



P. S. Colick, race president, radio-tele- 
vision division, Ronalds Advertising agency, 

Ltd., Toronto, Canada 
Probably the most important factor 
to be considered is product category. 
In some areas Canadian consumers 
will respond to much the same sales 
appeals and advertising techniques as 
their neighbors to the south. In other 
cases habits, tastes and different eco- 
nomic and climatic conditions may 
demand quite different approaches to 
those made in the United States. 

Essentially, of course, most Ca- 
nadians grow up under ver\ similar 
environmental conditions to Ameri- 
cans. It's reasonable to expect that 
the same basic drives for security, 
recognition, and so on, apply to people 
throughout North America. However, 
for the most part, Canadians are con- 
sidered more conservative than Ameri- 



" in ore loyal 
to Brands" 




cans. Thev are said to be slower to 
pick uj) new habits, that is. to go for 
change. Bv the same token they are 
supposed to be more loyal to brands 
the\ ha\e started using. There is un- 
doubtedh considerable truth in these 
assertions and yet, I would hesitate 
to applv them indiscriminately to 
even ad problem which occurs. 






SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 



I .i an) I . S. i"iii isl 01 business 

in. in n I met i" < .in. i'l. i ii niii-i 

seem oln ious thai there are more 
-iinil.ii ii iea bel win ( .nun k- and 
\ nit i ii .in- than there are diffei em es 

though there are \>i\ real differ- 
ences and the similarities m.i\. in 
themselves be .1 trap. 

I ndoubtedl) . the single, most dra- 
m.iiii dissimilarity between Canadian 
and I . S. in.ii kets i- the Proi in< e ol 
Quebec. Here the differences are so 
obvious even tin- most casual I 
observe) will realize thai he is deal- 
ing with .1 different culture which bas 
ii- nun special and unique features 
;iml problems. 

Basically, however, it must always 
be remembered thai I Canada is .1 sep- 
arate political and geographical en- 
iii\ with a territorj target than 1 1n- 
I . S. and a population reaching to- 
wards the IT million mark. \ml it 
must be remembered that Canadians 
are proud '>l theii countr) and grow- 
ing more conscious "I this pride ever) 
day. We are a people of an independ- 
ent turn ol mind and are growing more 
independent ever) day, a people who 
resent patronage whether it comes 
from across the Atlantic or overland 
from the south. Willi this pride goes 
the enigma that though Canada was 
settled earliei than the I . S., Cana- 
dians considei their countr) the 
younger of 1 1 » * - two. I ndoubtedl) we 
have grown t<> a national maturit) 
more slowly and have done it con- 
stitutionally, without am violent over- 
throwing of British influence. 

So, perhaps, it a measure is to be 
a|>pli<-il that will provide some sort of 
legitimate criterion, it would show 
Canada standing somewhen' midwa\ 
between America and Britain with 
greater similarity, in it- accepted 
form-, to American advertising, but 
with a seasoning <>f reserve to make 
it more t" the average taste. 

Finally, I would certainlj advocate 
thai an advertiser from outside 
Canada \\ In > wishes t<> break into this 
market obtain first-hand information 
on this countr) and it- people. 



John T. ROSS, '• P- & general mat 
Robert Lawrence Productions, Ltd., Toronto, 

Canada 
I wish I could -a\ that there is some- 
thing distinctl) Canadian about a I a- 
nadian television commercial Gen- 
erall) speaking, a first-rate commercial 
produced either in the I nited Stair- or 



1 .111.1.I.1 would • "ni. mi the same basii 
ingredients top quality, believability, 
and entertainment. 

Cut marketing experts, in the 1 

..| 1 1 .mil 1I1 ug produi 1-. would dis 

covei thai < anadian broadi .1-1 in{ 
illations forbid mam ol the exaggerated 
1 I. him- allowed on Vmei ii an tele> ision. 

1 ..mm. 11 iala w Iim Ii require -■ enii 
I . . n k •_■ 1 miiiil whiih ma\ I"' identifiable 



f 3 ^ 



nn n 1 



>ah 



shaded patio 






should feature < Canadian Bcenes. It is 
unlikel) thai a Canadian cigarette 
commercial would show a couple re- 
laxing on a palm-shaded patio in sun- 
in Florida. Ii is -till more unlikel) 
1l1.it the commercial would I"' believ- 
able. 

Canadian soap manufacturers have 
long realized that onl) a small per- 
centage of Canadian families own an 
automatic washing machine. Mosl of 
the commercials produced exclusivel) 
foi the Canadian market feature the 
wringer-type washing machine. How- 
e\ ei . despite all these 'mechanii al 
differences, American advertisers 
should keep in mind thai what 
i- good for America is not always 
good for Canada from the cop) 
standpoint. Canadians, for the most 
part, are inclined to be 1 onservative 
in both tastes and habits and heartil) 
dislike the inference that the onl) dif- 
ference between the I . N . and Canada 
i> the border line that necessitates a 
passport or customs declaration. 
Vdvertising to the French (ana- 
dian market almost requires a com- 
pleter) new set of rules. It is safe to 
-,i\ that no one know- this market 
better than a Fren< h I anadian. or at 
leasl a Canadian with a background in 
thai 5phere "t the Canadian scene, fhe 
■ : majorit) of so-called 'French' 
commercials are simpl) English com- 
mercials with French sound tia. k- 
and superimpositions. 

More often than not, French com- 
mercials are afterthoughts, and be- 
1 .in-.' the commercial budget has 
ahead) been -|><-nt on the produt t - 
English commercials, a few hundred 
dollar- i- allocated foi French sound- 
tracks. I strongl) believe that this is 
one case of false economy. ^ 



Vl 



1 ► 



s 



P0 



'/|l' ST 



C* 



.c* 



l>' 



,h«« 



u die" te 



in Louisiana's 
2 biggest markets 



KCU 

«... —-2 *s»-«.-? 



•'•°*~°noo v..""-*"" 



taHPN 



«««** 



**""-rz,-«**: 



ou *.i<« ". \, H.9« 
.lotion «• w0 « 

station'. 



.,„.,.. s^^" 56 



KCU WMRY 

The BIG City Station 

wilh the The Se P'° Slot. on 
Country Flavor 

5000W 980 KC 1000W 600 KC 



Southland Broadcasting Company 

Mort SiUtrman. Bute. V.P. A Gen. Mgr. 

GIU-PERNA. INC. - Nat I Rep. 

New York. Chicago, los Angeles. Son Francisco 



SPONSOR 



1') .1 \\i UCi I95"i 






Meet Denver's 
BEST SALESMAN 

BUGS BUNNY 




Channel 9-ABC-TV 

Bugs Bunny and his other 
Warner Brothers cartoon 
friends are now available 
to sell for you in Denver. 

PLUS 

POPEYE 
THE SAILORMAN 




Call Peters, Griffin, Wood- 
ward or John Henry at 
KBTV for availabilities. 




DENVER 

John C. Mullins Joe Herold 

President Station Manager 

Owned and Operated by 

TV DENVER, INC. 

1089 Bannock • TAbor 5-6386 

Represented by Peters, Griffin. Woodward, Inc. 






56 



r. Sponsor 



Larry McQueen: Fast Talker 

L : McQueen, General Tire & Rubber Co. v.p. in charge of 
sales, insists that his grandson is absorbing the hackground of a 
future adman. He relates how the boy interrupted him while he 
was telling the story about Ali Baba and the 40 thieves. 

"What's your own 'Open Sesame'?" the boy asked. 

"I explained that we use advertising, 1957 style, to open the door 
for General Tire," McQueen told SPONSOR. 

With its nationwide dealer organization, based on exclusive terri- 
torj franchises, General Tire has a two-fold aim in advertising: I 1 I 
keeping the dealers assured of continuous advertising support: (2) 
selling the consumer on the firm's products. 

"Our dealer organization is backed up by more advertising dol- 
lars per distributor than any other sales force in the industry," says 
McQueen. 

A major chunk of the firm's spot tv effort is placed locally b\ 




McQueen (Z.) and Torn O'Nett, jires. of General Teleradio, with Anita Ekberg 

some 200 dealers on a co-op basis. These dealers buv about 52.000 
announcements a year totally, with film commercials provided by 
the parent company through its agency, D'Arcy. 

"We do like the flexibility of spot tv and radio. sa\s McQueen. 
"In that way, we can appeal to tourists during the \acation season, 
or stress wintertime use of our tires, depending upon the weather 
conditions." 

The commercials approach is a combination of demonstration 
and hard-sell aimed at men. 

"Women may be vital in picking a car for color and style, but 
it's the man who buys the tires." 

General Tire puts about one-third of its total budget into the 
air media. "Television is, of course, the ideal medium for demon- 
strating the puncture-sealing characteristics of General Tires. Our 
plastics goods also have a more telling effect when \ isuallv demon- 
strated." 

The company's greatest single t\ expenditure each vear is its 



-I'oNSOR 



19 JANUARY 195' 




MATURITY 



Maturity makes haste slowly. 

We like quick sales, too. But if... from our 
years of experience .. .we feel too hurried 
action endangers future success, we say so. 

We've found it pays to help clients 

choose between hasty decisions ... and wise ones. 



AVERY-KNODEL 



INCORPORATED 



NEW YORK ATLANTA DALLAS DETROIT SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES CHICAGO 



Let air aeunt 
^E$7 product! 




This is not retortical: 
Once you stick your beaker in- 
to channel 7's market you'll 
put WSAU-TV down for more 
tests and refinements in the 
HEART OF WISCONSIN — 
where you get reduction in 
costs and reaction in sales. 

GROSS FARM INCOME $207,408,000 
TOTAL RETAIL SALES $567,064,000 



MM' 

WAUSAU, WIS 




OWNED & OPERATED BY 
WISCONSIN VALLEY TELEVISION CORP. 



Mr. Sponsor continued.. 



sponsorship of professional football on Thanksgiving over tv. The 
CBS TV program in 1956 cost General SI 75.000 for 126 stations. 
The Tretulex rating for the game was 16.9 or 51/? of the total tv 
audience. And the station lineup was designed to reach 90' % of all 
t\ sets in the U. S. 

"We've considered bu\ing a network tv show for complete spon- 
sorship if we found the proper formula," McQueen told sponsor. 
"D'Arcy screens programs continuously and they know what we 
want. After all. they've been our agencv for 40 years." 

The program. McQueen feels, would probably be in some form 
of sports coverage or format, since General advertising is aimed at 
men. Of course. McQueen admits that he's a sports fan himself, 
"strictly as a spectator, except where golfs concerned, and there I'm 
not in a championship class either." i He plays a low-80 brand of 
jjolf. actually, and is a "money" bowler, i 

An informal, easy-going man in his mid-sixties, McQueen has 
been in the rubber industry for more than four decades. A crucial 
year in his life was 1929 "not for the obvious reasons, but because 
I left my job as manager of tire sales at Goodrich to become trade 
sales manager at General." 

Continuity has been a password in his life, he feels. "There was 
never any doubt but that I'd be going into sales, for instance." In 
his senior year at the University of Wisconsin back in 1913, Mc- 
Queen was chosen as one of the four outstanding sales executive 
prospects of the graduating class. 

From arguing to selling's just one easy step 

However, he adds that there was an inevitability about his fu- 
ture even earlier than that. "When I was a kid I used to love to 
argue. I guess that would have made me either a wise guv or a 
good salesman." When he won a state oratorical contest while an 
undergraduate, the "Rubicon was crossed." and it had to be adver- 
tising or sales, and actually. McQueen's career became a combina- 
tion of both. 

One characteristic has remained consistent in McQueen s life: 
He's as gregarious today as he was in the old Phi Delt house back 
in college. Club memberships aren't a matter of sheer record to 
him. He enjoys mingling with people and does so not onlv for 
business purposes, but as a natural part of his dailv activities. 

In his two and a half decades at General Tire, he's seen the com- 
pany grow from sales under $30 million to $370 million in 1956. 
Total sales for 1957. including General Tire subsidiaries, are esti- 
mated at $425 million. 

"Television plays an increasingly important part in our over-all 
advertising planning," sa\s McQueen. "To date, most of Generals 
tv advertising concerns passenger and commercial tires. Next in 
importance would be dealer services. A third major area for tv 
advertising is the introduction of new products." 

For its network tv advertising. General will continue to seek out 
the one-shot t\pe of sponsorship, chiefiv in the sports field, until 
an ideal weeklv program appeals to agencv and General executive 
alike. Tentative plans for 1957 may include sponsoring the I . S. 
Open on t\ . 

"If we do. you can be sure that I'll be watching it on tv." says 
McQueen. And if it's in Florida, he nun just go down to his home 
there and watch it in person. ^ 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 




YOU Ml <>ll I THROW THE DMSCUS 194 Vi* 

llll... YOU NEED WKZO-TV 
TO BE CHAMP IN 



NIELSEN NCS NO. 2 
NOVEMBER, 1956 



DAYTIME NIGHTTIME 

No. of Weekly Daily Weekly Daily 

Station TV Homes NCS NCS NCS NCS 

In Area Circ. Circ. Circ. Circ. 



WKZO-TV 633.120 421.820 292,720 464.530 378.080 

STATION B 512.980 310.720 203,170 348.140 278.660 



KALAMAZOO-GRAND RAPIDS! 

Here's prooi thai \\ KZO-T\ is the t ■ • | ■ buj in one ol Vraer- 
ica's top-20 television markets. November, L956 Nielsen li-- 
ures, left, show thai \\ k/O-'l \ gets II', more viewers day- 
t i 1 1 1*-. ,tn<l >(>' , more nighttime, than the second station. In 
fact, WKZO-T\ delivers more viewers nighttime I > \ 1 1 ^ 
than the second station delivers MONTHLY,daj WD night! 

WKZO-TN is the Official Basi< I 1'.- Television Outlet for 
Kalamazoo-Grand Rapids and Greatei Western Michif 
li serves over 600,000 television families in 29 Western 
Michigan and Viriln-rn Indiana counties. 



100,000 WATTS • CHANNEL 3 • 1000 TOWER 




**- Al -* 1 



>7/t< } >/<>/' <>t Ufa fit >/•> 

WKZO-TV — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 
WKZO RADIO — KALAMAZOO BATTLE CREEK 
WJEF RADIO — GRAND RAPIDS 
WJEFFm — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 
KOLN-TV — LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 

Associated with 
WM8D RADIO — PEORIA. ILLINOIS 





Kalamazoo - Crand Rapids and Greater Western Michigan 

Avery- Knodel, Inc. Exclusive National Representatives 



'Fortune Gordien <<>« this morWt record in Putmienm, California, on tmgmmi 22. /''.>.'{. 



A weekly listing of changes 

in the advertising and broadcast fields 



NEW AND RENEW 



NEW ON RADIO NETWORKS 



SPONSOR 

Bon Ami, NY 

Bon Ami, NY 

Bon Ami, NY 

C. H. Musselman Co, Biglerville, Pa 

Nestle, White Plains, NY 

Nestle, White Plains, NY 

Nestle, White Plains, NY 

Norwich Pharmacal, Norwich, NY ... 

Perkins Products, Chi 

Pharma-Craft, Batavia, III 



AGENCY 



R&R, NY 



R&R, NY 
R&R, NY . 
APCL&K, Phila 
B. Houston, NY 
B. Houston, NY 
B. Houston, NY 

B&B, NY 

FC&B, NY . 
|WT, Chi 



Salada Tea Co, Boston 
Salada Tea Co, Boston 



Hermon W. Stevens, Boston 
Hermon W. Stevens, Boston 



STATIONS 

ABC 

ABC 

ABC 
ABC 

ABC 

ABC 

. ABC 

NBC 188 

ABC 

NBC 188 ...... 

CBS 33 

CBS 33 



Salada Tea Co, Boston 

Salada Tea Co, Boston 
Salada Tea Co, Boston 
Scott Paper, Chester, Pa 

Scott Paper, Chester, Pa 
Scott Paper, Chester, Pa 
Scott Paper, Chester, Pa 

Scott Paper, Chester, Pa 

III 



Hermon W. Stevens, Boston CBS 33 

.Hermon W. Stevens, Boston CBS 33 

Hermon W. Stevens, Boston CBS 33 

.JWT, NY CBS 201 



JWT, NY . 

JWT, NY ... 

.JWT, NY . 

JWT, NY ... 



CBS 7.01 
CBS 201 
CBS 201 

.CBS 201 



A. E. Staley, Decatur, 
Warner-Lambert, NY 
Warner-Lambert, NY 
Warner-Lambert, NY _. Lambert & Feasley, NY NBC 188 



R&R, Chi CBS 201 

.Lambert & Feasley, NY CBS 78 

.Lambert & Feasley, NY CBS 78 



Warner-Lambert, NY 



Lambert & Feasley, NY NBC 188 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

-My True Story; M-F 10-10:30 am; var segs; 24 Jan 
When A Cirl Marries; M-F 10:30-10:45 am; var segs 24 Jan 
Whispering Streets; M-F 10:45-11 am; var segs; 24 Jan 
8-eakfast Club; M 9-9:05 am, Tu 9:20-9:25 am; 18 Mar 
Breakfast Club; Tu & F 9:05-9:10 am; 15 Jan 
My True Story; Th 10:15-10:20 am, F 10:20-10:25 am; 15 Jan 
Whispering Streets; W & Th 10:55-11 am; 15 Jan 
Monitor; 3 announcements per weekend; 5 Jan; 11 wks 
Breakfast Club; M-F 9-10 am; 5 segs per wk; 27 May 
News of The World; M-F 7:30-7:45 pm; 1 partic per day; 

14 Jan; 52 wks 
Road of Life; M 1:45-2 pm; V 2 spon; 31 Dec; 52 wks 
Right To Happiness; Tu 2:05-2:15 pm; 7'/2 min spon; 1 Jan; 

52 wks 
Second Mrs. Burton; W 2:15-2:30 pm; l/ 2 spon; 2 Jan; 52 

wks 
Nora Drake; Th 1-1:15 pm; '2 spon; 3 Jan; 52 wks 
Our Cal Sunday; F 12:45-1 pm; V 2 spon; 4 Jan; 52 wks 
Helen Trent; M & Th 12:30-12:45 pm; V 2 spon; 1 Jan; 

52 wks 
Our Cal Sunday; M-F 12:45-1 pm; V 2 spon; 1 Jan; 52 wks 
Nora Drake; Tu 1:15-2:00 pm; '2 spon; 1 Jan; 52 wks 
Young Dr. Malone; Tu & F 1:30-1:45 pm; J£ spon; 1 Jan; 52 

wks 
-Second Mrs. Burton; Tu & F 2:15-2:30 pm; 1/2 spon; 1 Jan; 

52 wks 
-House Party; Tu 3:15-3:30 pm; 1 Jan; 52 wks 
-Nora Drake; Tu & Th 1-1:15 pm; V 2 spon; 8 (an; 13 wks 
-Road of Life; MWF 1:45-2 pm; ' 2 spon; 7 Jan; 13 wks 
Bandstand; M-F 10:05-11 am, 11:05-12 n; 2 parties per day; 

7 Jan; 12 wks 
Woman In My House; M-F 4-4:15 pm; 1 partic per day; 7 

Jan; 12 wks 



RENEWED ON RADIO NETWORKS 



SPONSOR 

American Home Products, NY .. 

Beltone Hearing Aid, Chi 

Foster-Milburn, Buffalo . 

Foster-Milburn. Buffalo 

Norwich Pharmacal, Norwich, NY 



AGENCY 



STATIONS 



SSC&B, NY MBS 



Olian & Bronner, Chi ABC 

Street & Finney, NY ABC 

Street & Finney, NY ABC 

B&B, NY NBC 188 



Norwich Pharmacal, Norwich, NY 



Charles Pfizer, Brooklyn 
Rust Craft, Decham, Mass 
Sleep-Eze Co, Long Beach, Cal 



B&B, NY 



NBC 188 



Burnett, Chi <^BC 

Chambers & Wiswell, Boston ABC 
Milton Carlson, LA MBS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

Gabriel Heatter; M-F 12:05-12:10 pm, 10:00-10:05 pm, 

7:30-7:35 pm; 20 Jan-April, 1957 
Breakfast Club; Th 9:20-9:30 am; 17 Jan 
My True Story; 1 seg per wk; 21 Jan; 52 wks 
Whispering Streets; 1 seg per wk; 21 Jan; 52 wks 
Bandstand; M-F 10:05-11 am, 11:05-12 n; 5 announcements 

per wk; 21 Jan; 9 wks 
Five Star Matinee; M-F 3-3:30 pm; 5 announcements per 

wk; 21 Jan; 9 wks 
Breakfast Club; various times; 20 Jan 
Breakfast Club; Tu 9:30-9:35; 12 Mar 
.Gabriel Heatter; MWF alt Tu Th, 7:35-7:40 pm; 20 Jan- 

April, 1957 



BROADCAST INDUSTRY EXECUTIVES 



NAME 

James E. Anderson 
Marilyn Arbetter 
James T. Aubrey, Jr. 
Charles C. Badger 

James F. Baker 

Joseph R. Cox 
James E. Denning 
Jerry Dreifuss 
Richard H. Graham 
Bruce Huffman 
Courtenay Jamison 
Joseph W. Killcen 
Fran King 

Irving Kleinfeld 

Larry H. Lau 
Bernard T. Maloney 
Charles W. Mason . 
Robert Morris 
Thomas W. Sarnoff 
Jim Smallwood 
W. D. Swanson . 
Herbert J. Teison 
William O. Tulloch 
Mortimer Weinbach 



NEW AFFILIATION 

Hal Roach Studios, Chi, dir midwest operations- 
NTA, NY, copy super-promotion dept 



com. div 



FORMER AFFILIATION 

Atlas Film Corp, tv dir 

Screen Gems, asst to dir publicity 

ABC, NY, dir programming & talent-tv Same, also vp 

Brookley Air Force Base, Mobile, Ala, public relations dir WALA, WALA-TV, Mobile, Ala, promotion & merch mgr 

RAB, NY, mgr stn services WPTR, Albany, NY, sis mgr 

CBS radio spot sis, NY, mgr mail order dept Same, acct exec-WCBS 

NBC, dir talent & program contract admin Same, vp-talent & program contract admin 

Morton C. Markell & W. Keyser Manly, NY, associate William Tell Productions. NY, special publicity dir 

NBC, law Same, vp-law-Pacific div 

KNXT-CTPN, Hy, nat spot sis rep Same, acct exec 

Maytag Southeastern, sis promotion mgr TvB, NY, dir production dept 

WTMJ, Milwaukee, sis 

KLOQ, Yakima, Wash, chg traffic & continuity 

Sterling Television Corp, editing & service depts 

KVAN, Vancouver, Wash, acct exec 

House Beautiful, Boston, space rep 

WSUN, WSUN-TV, St. Petersburg, Fla. tv production mgr 

KTVX, Muskogee-Tulsa, Okla, program dir 

NBC, dir production & business affairs 
KFWB, Hy 

.KTVX, Muskogee-Tulsa, Okla, local & regional sis mgr .. 
Schwerin Radio-Tv Research, publicity & promotion dir 
WTMJ-TV, Milwaukee, sis 
ABC, NY, vp chg labor relations Same 



Same, asst sis mgr 

Same, program dir 

Trans-Lux Tv Corp, NY, sis service mgr 

Same, gen sis mgr 

WBZ-TV, Boston, sis staff 

Same, mgr sis promotion & advtng-r-tv 

Same, operations dir 

Same, vp-production & business affairs-Pacific div 

KWC, Stockton, Calif, sis rep 

Same, commercial mgr 

WPTR, Albany, NY, promotion publicity dir 

Same, asst sis mgr 

vp & gen counsel 



60 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 




WBAY GREEN BAY 



in the land of.../^ 






HAYDN R EVANS, Gen Mgr Rep WEED TELEVISION 



SPONSOR • V) JANUARY 1957 



61 



YOU SELL 

Louisville 

When 

You Use 




Jack Bendt 

For eight years, Jack Bendt has been 
the radio guest in ten's of thousand's 
of Kentuckiana homes 7 to 9 each 
morning and from I I to 2:30 during the 
noontime hours, Monday through Sat- 
urday. In a friendly, yet forceful, 
pleasant yet persuasive manner, he has 
become the TOP AIR-SALESMAN in 
the Area. We suggest you check his 
ratings, and compare his results and 
you will find you need Jack Bendt to 
"TELL and SELL" the rich Kentuckiana 
Market. 



Represented by 
John Blair & Co. 



WKLO 



LOUISVILLE 



02 



National and regional spot buys 
in work now or recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

Trend of the week: Some advertisers find their direct sell on 
tv should concern a concept, with the secondary pitch one in behalf 
of their own product. Witness the upcoming campaign of Lipton 
Tea I see below I . which promotes consumption of hot tea first, then 
its own brand. 

Clamorene, Inc., New York Cit\. for its rug cleaner, is starting 
a drive in 30 markets 28 January for from eight to 13 weeks. 
Minutes will be aired at the rate of 12 to 40 per market per week. 
Buying is half completed. Agency: Product Services, New York 
City. Bu\er: Mort Reiner. 

Scoft Paper Co., Chester, Pa., through J. Walter Thompson. New 
1 ork. starts buying late this month for a spot campaign in the 
top 10 metropolitan areas. Duration will vary from 13 and 26 to 
30 weeks. Minutes are preferred. Buyers: Jayne Shannon and 
Marie Barbato. 

Thomas J. Lipton, Inc., Hoboken, N.J., starts pushing a "hot tea" 
theme 1 Februarv with a schedule in 70 markets for a four-week 
period. Filmed minutes and 20's will be slotted during nighttime 
periods. Buying is incomplete. Agency : Young & Rubicam, New 
York. Buyer: Marie Mooney. 

Procter & Camble, Cincinnati, is planning to use a spot tv drive 
to launch another new product. Blue Dot Duz. Announcements will 
be on film, and time is being bought now. Agency : Compton, New 
York. Buver: Bob Liddel. 



RADIO BUYS 

Trend of the week: Off-beat products new to the radio medium 
are moving into spot with tests of their aural pull with con- 
sumers. Case in point is Pycopay toothbrushes (see below I , unique 
tvpe of advertiser in any medium. 

McCormick & Co., Baltimore, is almost ready to launch a na- 
tional radio campaign. The schedule will provide for from 10 to 
30 announcements per market per week in the daytime hours 
between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. Both live copy and transcriptions will 
be aired, with a concentration of announcements toward the end of 
the week. Agency: Lennen & Newell, New York. Buyer: Jean Jaffee. 

General Foods, White Plains, N. Y.. for its Jell-0 Instant Pudding, 
starts a drive 6 February for seven weeks at the frequent) of 
25 announcements per market weekly. Minutes and 20"s will be 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 



IN THE OK GROUP MARKETS 



NOBODY KNOWS MORE 
ABOUT THE NEGRO POTENTIAL 




THE 



RE ^L TRADE 

graduate resea UrilV etsi« ' V ^ oi his 

Texas * o0 \ ni 2\ n iS-«°o nlh r s "d buywg 
-oooi. totd. in ^ po«et aua 

>» bilS ; ved to-ard ecoBOtnic eq 

bastnoven _ _ ^~^ 
whites- 



i 



WE have the only 
copy of this survey 
for confidential viewing 
by OK advertisers * 



MOK 



REACH 1,250,000 NEGROES in all three major 



markets 



•:■:• 



FOR ONLY $14 92 PER SPOT 

The three top Negro markets in tK>- 3onth can now be a 
ered by one package purchase . . . one bill, one payment and 
a special low price. New Orleans, the No. 1 Negro city in 
the south . . . Houston, the No. 2 Negro city . . . and V 
phis, tli.' No. 3 Negro city, can all be covered by top rated 
<>K Stations with intensive radio . . . extensive merchan- 
dising and expansive | a. Act now . . . it'- a RADIO 
BARGAIN! 

• ev can be seen only by persons: 
general publica' 

Call Forioe for Louisiana Stations, Stars National for KYOK. 





NEW ORLEANS 



ViXO/C 

HOUSTON 

viiOK 



MEMPHIS 



NOW 5000 WATTS 

mot 

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 

Covering major high income 

Negro area at lowest 

cost in Memphis 



SP0.\>OK 



19 JANUARY 1957 



63 



T 


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lowest 


H: 


: 


cost- per- thousand 


-E 


^| 


in Columbus | 


III 




D^ 




tt ^ 


1 ATrlll 


Si 


IVl'lil 1 


D^ 




aJ — 




OI 


cost per thousand is 


;; 44% lower than its 




closest rival. 


Z 1 


:• 


wm -= 




o 1 


iVill 1 


Z3 


1 1 1 1 kVI 


< =1 




VI ^ 




D-f 


!; delivers 5.1 average 


o ^ 


a between 8 and 5. No 


s = 


| ratings below 4.4 


H^§ 


I Pulse: Sept.-Oct. '56 


tti 


1 fU RflMIA 


HI - 


I 1 11 11 1 


a 1 


IVill I 


K 


I _= 


IV V I^V 


II 


I I 


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Ol 




v-i 


| covers what counts! 


-= 


| 800,000 people in half 


H I 


g millivolt contour. 


m^ 


J 550,000 of them are 


yi := 


in Franklin County . . . 


si 


the home county. 


©J 


| 


l"l 


! unfit** 


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11 All 


^z: 








t Columbus, Ohio 

j the station with 
a personality. 












f 6 


u 


ie-fkeAfote-We 


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ieallfoiJoB 






Spot buys continued. 



ii-cd in III cities during the daytime hours between 8 and noon, with 
a heavying up toward the end of the week. Agency: Young & 
Rubicam, New York. Buyer: Bill Dollard. 

Browne-Vintners Co., Inc., through Lawrence C. Gumbinner 
agency, both New York City, is going into eight markets 4 February 
for 13 weeks to push its Cherry Kijafa. Buying is about completed. 
IWm-i: Diane Neugarten 

D-Con Co., Chicago, and its new agency. Thompson-Koch. New 
^ ork, launch a spot radio drive in 150 markets early next month 
to advertise D-Con rat poison in the Midwest. Company is using 
a combination of transcribed and minute announcements and 
participations and a five-minute service show outlining uses of the 
product. Buying is incomplete. Campaign includes multiple sta- 
tions in some cities, and continues through November. 

Block Drug Co., Jerse) City, N. J., begins a radio test this week 
for the first time in behalf of its Pycopay toothbrush. Markets will 
vary from three to five for a 23-week period, with results being 
contrasted with a comparable drive in the same number of tele- 
vision cities. Minimum frequency is five announcements weekly 
in early morning time. Tv schedule is part of one now running in 
25 to 28 markets, where commercials at the rate of three per week 
are aired in early morning and late night time. Agency: SSC&B, 
New York. Buyer: Ira Gonsier. 

Maiden Form Brassiere Co., New York City, has begun buying 
in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. February-March schedule is an 
area test that w ill measure radios pull as an adjunct to print, with 
consumer contest entry blanks given out bv retailers. Schedule: 29 
to 36 announcements per week in each market. Buyer: Jeanne 
Sullivan. Agency: Norman, Craig. & Kummel. New York Cit\ . 



RADIO & TV BUYS 

Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co., New York, for its L & M Filters, 
will use saturation tv and radio announcement schedules to back 
its new crush-proof box as it is introduced into 16 more states. 
\genc\ : Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample. New York. Bu\er: Charles Mil- 
lard. 

Larus & Brother Co., Richmond, Va., begins a 45-week campaign 
early in February to launch its new concept of offering premium 
jiifts on the installment plans to buyers of Holiday cigarettes. 
Initial kickoff drive starts in the New England states with minutes 
in both media at saturation rates. Agency: Reach, Yates & Mattoon, 
New York. Buyer: MacDonald Dunbar. 

National Biscuit Co., New York, for its NBC bread, is scouting 
l\ and radio news programs in selected market areas where its local 
bakeries are located. Most of its 15 bakeries throughout the country 
relj heavily on t\ and radio, kgencj : McCann-Erickson, New 
York. Buyer: Sal Agovino. 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 




LOOK AT IT THIS WAY. . . 



*11 OF THE TOP 15 

SHOWS IN ROCHESTER 

are on Channel 10! 



THIS WAY... 



66% of 

**53%., 



ROCHESTER'S MORNING VIEWERS 
ROCHESTER'S AFTERNOON VIEWERS 



* 



55%of 



ROCHESTER'S EVENING VIEWERS 

SUNDAY THROUGH SATURDAY! 



THIS WAY... 



OUT OF 570 COMPETITIVE QUARTER - HOURS 



* CHANNEL 10 GETS 384 FIRSTS... 5 ties 
STATION "B" GETS 181 FIRSTS. ..5 ties 



Whichever way you look at it... CHANNEL 10 
HAS A GREAT BIG LEAD IN ROCHESTER 

*T*I_ATEST ROCHESTER PULSE REPORT • OCTOBER 1956 



CHANNEL | 



ROCHESTER'S 

own "BIG lO" 





ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



sponsor • 1") .1 \m \rv 1957 



65 



Digest of the week's developments 
in advertising and the air media 



News and Idea WRAP-UP 



ADVERTISERS 

The l.il- I. Ford's new medium- 
priced entry is shopping around 
for a distinctive network tv show 
(or shows). 

Continuing reports around the in- 
dustry set the initial kick-ofi ad budget 
at $10 million with half of that 
amount going to network t\. Debut 
date for the F.dsel will probably be in 
September. 

As a medium-priced car it will be 
directly competitive with (i. M. s 
Buick Roadmaster. Olds !!!! and Pon- 
tiac. 

Creative work on the Edsel is being 
handled b\ FCB's Chicago office, al- 
though the agenc) recently opened a 
162-person office in Detroit just for 
the new car. 

Incidental intelligence: In the FCB 
employee contest to name the car, 50 
people from the New York office alone 
suggested the Edsel title. A single 
winner of the contest was to have re- 
ceived one of the Edsels. but now the 
New York 50 will each get a prize of 
$50. 

Another monopolistic practices 
suit has been filed against RCA. 

The latest filer is Philco. Also named 
as defendants are C.K. and \.T.&T. 



Philco is asking damages of $150 
million, charging the three companies 
with monopolistic practices in the op- 
eration of the RCA patent pool in ra- 
dio, tv and other phases of the elec- 
tronics field. The Department of Jus- 
tice filed a similar suit in 1954 which 
is still pending. 

The new suit also alleges that Philco 
had been compelled to sell its Phila- 
delphia station. WPTZ to Westing- 
house in 1953 for "a price substantial- 
l\ less than the property was worth 
after it had allegedly been threatened 
with the loss of its NBC affiliation. 

American Tobacco Co.'s "Happy 
Joe Lucky"' now has a rival. 

Chesterfield is launching a stepped- 
up ad campaign to introduce the 
"King." He's a new cartoon trade- 
mark complete with court I "Harold 
the Herald" and "Bushy the Lion" I 
and will be seen on Chesterfield's tv 
shows including the new Hey Jeannie. 
Liggett & Myers has bought alternate 
weeks of this CBS-TV situation com- 
edy series as part of its intensified 
advertising plan. Alternating Sponsor- 
ship starts in February. 

Executives Radio-Tv Service has 

changed the format of its Spot Radio 
Reports. Advertisers schedules are now 



grouped alphabetically under specific 
product categories where formerly in- 
formation had been listed under ad- 
vertising agencies . . . Holiday cig- 
arettes will use spot tv and radio as 
a part of the New England test of its 
new down-pav ment premium plan. 
The coupon plan enables smokers to 
make an initial payment of 15 Holida\ 
coupons for a premium gift and then 
pay the balance of the coupons owed 
as they smoke. 

The Association of National Adver- 
tisers in cooperation with the Point of 
Purchase Advertising Institute has pro- 
duced a 2!54-page book based on prac- 
tices and experiences of over 150 lead- 
ing advertisers in the point of purchase 
field. 'Advertising at the Point of Pur- 
chase will he published on 22 January 
by McGraw-Hill . . . The National 
Board of Fire Underwriters will 
conduct a 13-week spot tv test in 10 
top markets beginning in March. The 
insurance group will use prime evening: 
time and cost will hit S300.000. An- 
nouncements will be of an institutional 
nature. 

L&M will step up its radio-tv cam- 
paign starting 28 January to push its 
new crush-proof box. Campaign calls 
for saturation radio and tv spots with 
regular network shows also participat- 




FILM: ^mong half-hour syndicated snow 

to replace feature film program on WOR- 
T\ , New York, is "0. Henry Playhouse' 



ADVERTISERS: Chesterfield's new trade 
character the "King" is making his radio- 
tv hou this month \ia network and spot 




RADIO STATIONS: King Bee of KCOH, 

Houston, interviews the I.ury cast in behalf 
of the Texas Crippled Children's Hospital 



66 



SPONSOR 



19 jam \i;\ 1957 




It*s .n in. ilK easj ii> save -when s"U l>u\ Series F. 
Savings Bonds through the Payroll Savings Plan. 
Once you've signed up .11 your p.i \ office, your 
saving i- done for ><>/;. The Bonds you receive pay 
good interest 3* a year, compounded half-yearly 
when held t" maturity. \nd the longei you hold 
them, the better \011r return. Even after maturity, 
thej no on earning 10 years more. So hold on to 
your Bonds! Join Payroll Savings today— or buy 
Bond* where sou bank. 



Why the killer came 
to Powder Springs 




1 111: >mw> little Texan w 1 1. . drifted into 
Butch Cassidy's layout al Powdei Springs 
one day in '97 had dead-level eyes, a droop) 
mustache, and two six-guns tied down {01 the 
East draw. Called himself I arter. Said he was 
a killer on the 1 un. 

That'9 \\li\ Cassid) and the outlaws in bis 
notorious W ild Bunt h told him all aboul the 
big future plans foi theii ti ain 1 obbei - sj n- 
dicate. The) took turn in. 

\nd he took them in. He- was a range de- 
tective whose real name was a legend in the 
West — Charlie Siringo. \nd the information 
he got before be quietl) slipped awaj 
Btopped tln-W ild Bunch foi a long, long time 

Of course, Siringo knevi all along thai if 
Cassid) "i the others had discovered the 
truth, they'd have killed him 9ure. Bui it just 

iir\ ei ""ii ied him an) . 

You couldn'l s« are Charlie Siringo. Cool- 
esl of cool 1 ustomers and rawhide tough, he 
had the go-it-alone courage it takes t" build 
a peaceable nation out ol wild frontier. 1 li.it 
brand of courage is pari "f America and Ii>t 
people part of the country's strength. \tul 
it's a big reason wh) one of the finest invest- 
ments \<>u can lay band- on 1- America's 
Savings Bonds. Because those Bonds are 
backed l>\ the independent •• and 1 ourage of 
165 million Americans. So bu) I S. Savings 
Bonds. I>n\ them confidently— regulai 
and bold on to them! 



Safe as America — U.S. Savings Bonds 



The U.S. Government does not p ■ - [All publication in cooperation trith the 

Adiertismg Council and the Magazine Publishers of America. 




SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY. 1957 



67 



iii» in introducing the new package . . . 
Slate Farm Mutual Automobile 

Co. will go in for sponsoring local 
news-weather-sports programs for the 
first time according to current 1957 
plans. TVs total share of State Farm 
Mutual's ad budget is 80^ of the $2.5 
million pie. 

AGENCIES 

For the first time tv will be used 
to advertise the advertising indus- 
try with a special one-minute spot 
speciallv prepared for Advertising 
Week. 



The spot is the result of the com- 
bined efforts of many hranches of the 
industry. It was conceived by Cun- 
ningham and Walsh's radio-tv depart- 
ment which worked closeh with Thom- 
as D'Arcy Brophy, chairman of Ken- 
\ on & Eckhardt and also chairman for 
Advertising Week. The commercial 
was financed by ABC. CBS and NBC 
at their request. And it was produced 
h\ Tv Spots. Inc., Los Angeles (ani- 
mation! and Elliott, I nger-Elhott, New 
York I live action). Theme is "Adver- 
tising Benefits You." 

Ed Mahoney. v. p. in charge of radio- 
tv at Cunningham & Walsh, points up 




Need a lift in the 
San Antonio area? 




is worth a schedule on KONO 



. . . that's why 88 national advertising 
budgets include KONO Radio . . . year 
after year. 

Get the facts — see your H-R or Clarke 
Brown man. 






860 kc 5000 watts 



KONO 



SAN ANTONIO 









RADIO 



success of spot as proof there need he 
no conflict or problems on East Coast - 
West Coast commercial production — 
if the agency sets up pre-production 
planning with all concerned and main- 
tains production control throughout 
the operation. 

NBC Radio's Imagery-Transfer 
theory will be tested by 15 leading 
ad agencies in an unique experi- 
ment. 

Agencies w ill place bushel baskets 
containing 20 packs of each of eight 
leading cigarettes in offices of their 
radio-tv directors. Signs over the bas- 
kets will ask visitors to pick their 
favorite brand by its slogan as each 
cigarette pack will be wrapped in a 
bag with only its ad slogan to identif\ 
the brand. 

Participating agencies include: 
Young & Rubicam, BBDO, McCann- 
Erickson, JWT, Bates. Benton \ 
Bowles. Burnett. Esty, DFS, K&E. 
Ayer, FCB. Compton, SSCB. and Len- 
nen & Newell. 

J. Walter Thompson's appliance 
merchandising committee has arranged 
an interesting tie-in between two cli- 
ents. Sylvania. has designed its new 
transistor radio to look like Ford's 
Thunderbird. The new Sylvania porta- 
ble radio is also called the '"Thunder- 
bird." 

Borden Food Products Co. has ap- 
pointed Lennen & Newell as agency for 
a new product. 

NETWORKS 

The end of spot vs. network radio 
"•bickering'''' was predicted by Don 
Durgin. v.p. in charge of ABC Radio 
network, in a talk before the Television 
and Radio Advertising Club of Phila- 
delphia. 

Durgin went on to outline network 
radios status today. He sees the grow- 
ing realization by agencies and adver- 
tisers that radio should not be judged 
in comparison with tv hut on the basis 
of total homes delivered, "'as all media 
are judged." Durgin said networks are 
no longer looking for a share of spot 
appropriations hut instead are bus\ 
showing clients and agencies why 
network radio is a necessary basic 
buy, like all other national media. 

He defines the advantages of spot as: 

l 1 l Ideal for filling in gaps. 

I 2 I Valuable for multi-station 
round-the-clock saturation. Durgin sees 



68 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 195 < 




ijom 6ed laoluUoa jpi '57! 




Resolve now to learn the full story of WFMY-TV's year-in. year-out 
coverage of the Prosperous Piedmont section of North Carolina and 
Virginia. You'll be happy to learn it takes only one station. WFMY-TV, 
to deliver complete coverage of this mighty industrial area of the South! 
Call your 11-R-P man today. 

50 Prosperous Counties • 2 Million Population 
$2.5 Billion Market • $1.9 Billion Retail Sales 



Greeniboro 

Winston-Salem 

Durham 

High Point 

Salisbury 

Reidsv.lle 

Chapel Hill 

Pinehufil 

Fort Bragg 

Sanford 

Martinsville, Vo. 

Danville, Va. 



WFMY-TV . . . Pied Piper of the Piedmont 
"First with LIVE TV in the Carolinas" 



uufnmij-tv 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Repreienled by 

Harrington, Righter 4 Parsons, Inc. 

New York — Chicago — Son Francisco — Atlanta 



Basic 




Since 1949 



SPONSOR • 10 .1 VM un lO.i, 






this as the unique advantage of net- 
work: "its cost efficiency over spot. 

Sponsors on the move at CBS-Tv. 

P&G is moving out of The Brothers as 
of 19 February but will still stay in 
the Tuesdax night line-up l>\ going in 
as alternate on the Phil Silvers Show 
starting 26 February. 

Royal Typewriter will relieve some 
of the burden b\ taking over for Ron- 
son on Playhouse 90 for three shows 
on 14 and 28 Februan and 14 March. 
Agency for Royal is Young & Rubicam. 
Ronson will sponsor the 21 and 2<°> 
February shows and then bow out of 
ihe series altogether. 

The Sweets Co. has extended its al- 
ternate-week quarter-hour sponsorship 
on NBC-TVs two Saturday shows, 
Howdy Doody and Cowboy Theatre, 
to run 26 consecutive weeks. This 
makes the candy company's daytime tv 
investment hit $1.5 million — gross . . . 
ABC Radio has signed two more 
sponsors for the morning block: C. H. 
Musselman Co. is making its first use 
of network radio via the Breakfast 
Club; Nestle has signed for the Don 
McNeil show plus two of the daytime 
dramas, adding up to six segments a 
w eek. 

ASSOCIATIONS 

George J. Abrams, advertising v. p. 
for Revlon, has been named new chair- 
man of the Association of National 
Advertisers' Radio & Tv Service Com- 
mittee. First duties will be to organize 
the ANA Radio-Tv advertising work- 
shop meeting set for 14 February at 
The Plaza in New York. 

Some tv myths laid to rest by 

Howard P. Abrahams. TvB's director 
of retail sales, at the recent National 
Retail Drv Goods Assn. meet included : 

• The old saw about the inflexibil- 
ity of television. Abrahams told the 
retailers that tv can be bought for spe- 
cial events and sales with strong im- 
pact coming from "staccato uses." 

• The fable about the complexity of 
l\ commercials. The TvB director 
pointed out that with the now available 
materials, tools and talent — plus a 
little guidance gladly supplied by your 
local tv station or by TvB — any adver- 
tiser can work out successful and effec- 
tive tv commercials. 

Sibley, Lindsey and Curr (Roches- 
ter, N. ^ .. department store) case his- 





Jf/Q average in-home rating 
increase for local programming on 
JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY stations 




THE VISUAL ABOVE is one of a series comprising "Spot Radio 
— 1957"; a concise 20-minute slide presentation marshaling basic 
media facts around which outstandingly successful sales-strategy 
has been planned. This study has already aroused the enthusiasm 
of key marketing men in America's advertising centers. If the 
executives who shape your advertising plans have not yet seen it, 
ask your Blair man to arrange for a showing soon. 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 



'new gains in selling-power 

and these major-market stations have led 
in developing today's effective programming 



Forty stations in major markets are repre- 
sented by John Blair & Company — by far the 
strongest group of markets and stations served 
by one representative. 

In a real sense, we work in partnership with 
these stations, functioning as an integral part 
of the station-organization in all matters affect - 
ing successful planning and sales. 

Through the years, we have shared in their 
problems, and their progress— and they in ours. 

These stations have a very vital point in 
common — they are registering audience gains. 
As the chart at left shows, listening to local 
daytime programs on Blair- represented sta- 
tions has gained materially since 1952. The 
average gain is 59 percent ! 

The advent of television brought a revolu- 
tion in radio. No longer do major stations 



depend solely on network features to build 
audience and sales-influence. Today, successful 
stations are intensely local in character— con- 
centrating on local interests, local problems, 
local tastes. 

Representing strong stations in every sec- 
tion, Blair has wide opportunity to study the 
effectiveness of varied program-techniques in 
building audience for the station and sales for 
the advertiser. In recent years, Blair stations 
have led in the development of local -interest 
programming — until today, in market after 
market, the Blair station stands first in audience, 
first in advertising accounts, first in sales-results. 

Ask your Blair man for the facts on any 
markets in which you are interested— and get 
full benefit of Spot Radio's strength in reaching 
your 1957 sales-goals. 




JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY 



OFFICES. 



NEW YORK 
ATLANTA 



CHICAGO 
DALLAS 



BOSTON 
LOS ANGELES 



DETRCHT 

SAN FRANCISCO 



ST. LOUIS 
SEATTLE 



Exclusive National Representatives for 



> New York WABC 

i Chicago WLS 

Philadelphia WFIL 

( Detroit WXYZ 

I Boston WHDH 

San Francisco KGO 

Pittsburgh WWSW 

St. Louis KXOK 

Washington WWDC 

Baltimore WFBR 

Dallas-Ft. Worth KLIF-KFJZ 



Minneapolis-St. Paul. . .WDGY 

Providence WPRO 

Seattle KING 

Houston KTRH 

Cincinnati WCPO 

Kansas City WHB 

Miami WQAM 

New Orleans WDSU 

Portland, Ore KGW 

Louisville WKLO 

Indianapolis WIBC 



Birmingham WAPI 

Columbus WBNS 

Tampa WFLA 

Albany- Schenectady- 

Troy WTRY 

Memphis WMC 

Phoenix KOY 

Omaha WOW 

Jacksonville WJAX 

Knoxville WNOX 

Wheeling WWVA 



Nashville WSM 

Binghamton WNBF 

Fresno KFRE 

Wichita KFH 

Tulsa KRMG 

Orlando WDBO 

Savannah WSAV 

Wichita Falls- 

Amarillo KWFT-KLYN 

Bismarck KFYR 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY I95"i 



71 



KPRS 



is the KEY to 
Kansas City's 127,600 
Negro Market 



o 



n 



The ONLY station in the rich Kan- 
sas City Metropolitan area beamed 
exclusively to the Negro Market . . . 



KPRS 

1000 W. — 1590 KC. 
Kansas City, Missouri 

Represented nationally by 
John E. Pearson Co. 




WSJS- 
Radio deliv- 
ers more audience 
in Winston-Salem 
plus a rich, pro- 
gressive 18-county 
Piedmont area than 
all other Winston- 
Salem stations 
combined. 



WINSTON-SALEM 

NORTH CAROLINA 

_ f WINSTON-SAIEM 

I for 




I 



GREENSBORO 
HIGH POINT 



5000 W • 600 KC • AAA-FM 

ArriDATC 

HEADLEY-REED. Repbesentatives 



tor) was cited. The store used a satura- 
tion campaign to push a warehouse 
sale. Cost of the advertising was the 
same as the previous year for news- 
paper space alone. I he tv-promoted 
sale topped the earlier sales results by 

TV STATIONS 

"Lei Freedom Ring" is WBZ-TV's 
call for 1957. 

\\ estinghouse's Boston outlet is de- 
voting the whole year to a large-scale 
public service project centered around 
the "freedom" theme. Idea for the 
campaign was horn last fall after WBZ- 
I \ general manager Franklin A. Tooke 
toured Radio Free Furope. Tooke 
terms the project as designed to help 
''cause a resurgence of appreciation in 
down-to-earth basic freedom, that 
which has made our land the most 
envied spot on Earth."' 

Each month will have its own free- 
dom theme. For example: January— 
"Call to Freedom." Regularly sched- 
uled shows will integrate American 
heritage subjects special freedom pro- 
grams are planned and news shows are 
now alerted to watch for events which 
fit into the month's theme. For the 
month of January alone 34 programs 
are being devoted to the freedom cause. 

Aside from programs. WBZ-TV is 
conducting special freedom spot cam- 
paigns each week. Also a "Freedom 
Fighters" club has been started so that 
the youngsters can actively participate. 

Year-end rate change report just 
released by Standard Rate and Data 
Service shows 1956 increases to be 
generally higher than in 1955 for all 
media covered, with tv stations leading 
in that activity. 

Report finds 239 tv stations out of 
447 raising rates from 4% to 300' < . 
Average increase hit 30.6 ( /< . On the 
other side of the coin. 12 stations 
showed lower rates with an average 
of 26.0%. Figures reflect trend for 
one-minute, one-time rates. 
**> 

Tv applications: Between 7 January 
and 12 January two applications for 
new stations were filed. Applications 
were made by Port City Television Co., 
Baton Rouge, La., for Channel 18, 
Baton Rouge. 256.6 kw visual, with 
tower 536 feet above average terrain, 
plant $325,000, yearl) operating cost 
$315,000; by Jack A. Burnett, Hono- 
lulu, for Channel 11. Provo. I tab. 
1.388 kw visual, minus 798 feet above 



average terrain, plant 870. ill 2. yearl) 
operating cost S90.000. 
Federal Savings and Loan Associa- 
tions of Philadelphia are going into t\ 
for the first time with a saturation spot 
campaign on WRCT-TV. Ecofi & James 
agenc) for the association, says switch 
to tv was due to belief that the medium 
offers more uniform coverage in the 
Eour-COtint) area where the 07 branches 
are located . . . Time, Inc. has sold 
KOB and KOIJ-TV. Albuquerque to 
KSTP, Inc., Minneapolis-St. Paul. Pur- 
chase price: $1.5 million. 
Here's another tv show designed 
to be "listenable." WTCS-TV, 
Springfield, III. has debuted the Bernie 
Johnson Show "for the homemaker 
who hasn t time to sit down and relax 
for a full hour before her t\ screen." 
. . . KARD-TV, Wichita, starts local 
colorcasting on 21 January . . . KFMB- 
TV, San Diego, has won a round in 
its battle with a local judge. The Dis- 
trict Court of Appeals ha:- ruled that 
tv reporters are in the same category 
with newspaper reporters and have the 
right to "attend court and take steno- 
graphic note-.'" 

How much of the tv picture actu- 
ally transmitted appears on the 
screen of tv set owners? 

This problem, bothersome to practi- 
cally everybody involved in ty (in- 
cluding the home viewer I. was tackled 
on 17 January 1>\ Screen Gems and 
WRCA-TV. New York, in a special 
early morning test over the station. 

The test, transmitted oyer the air 
between 6:30 and 6:45 a.m.. consisted 
of a lined and numbered chart, the 
four outer edges of which represent 
the limits of the area scanned and tele- 
vised by a tv station. \ iewers were in- 
vited to drop a card to the station in- 



$0H/ People 
Looking 



are 



WB IT 



Alabama's 



fat? 



BIRMINGHAM 



in Television 



72 



SPONSOR 



19 JAM ARY 1057 



.In al ing the numbered limits "I theii 
i>.ii i i< id. ii picture. 

I In- project w.i- undertaken .it the 
urging "i Si ' een ( Jems technical dircx 
tor, Petei Keane, who feela the current 
practice of man) produi ei - limiting 
theii message to 60-70${ <>l 1 1 ■ « - total 
area maj be unneceaeary. 

RADIO STATIONS 

\ll< baa nothing on WkMII. 
Dearborn, Mich., when it comet to 
selling five-minute hourl) news- 
casts. I In- independent has i usl 
Bigned Faj go Beverage < o. foi all 
newscasts between 6:30 a.m. and 
12:30 a.m. "ii .1 52-week contract. 

I In- woi 1%- "iii .1- III h\ e minute 
shows pei da) oi I <•' L . hours "I pro- 
graming .i week. 

i sponsor i "\ ered Fa) go's use oi 
t\ in tin- 21 Novembei issue in an 
article titled "Tv's Third Dimension: 

lllllllol ." I 

Scientifically designed radio pro- 
graming i-> being instituted 1»> 
KSTP. 

The St. Paul station has reformated 
in hi the desires "I listeners in (In- 
Twin Cities area. New programs and 
concepts are based on several months 
of scientific market stud) and analysis 
directed l>\ Dr. K<>\ Francis, sociolo- 
gist and market surve) specialists of 
the I niversit) of Minnesota. 

Thi;* recipe for a successful farm 
radio program cornea from KM \. 
Shenandoah, la. 

• I nderstanding i>f the farmer's 
wa) of life, including lii> problems and 
dreams. 

• Frank discussion "I issues. 

• \id in making decisions 'without 
making decisions for him. i 

• Information that i- both accurate 
ami timeh/, plus information about 
his customers. 

• Interpretations of weather, mar- 
kt t- and farm news. 

• Opportunity to tell his -tor\ on 
the air i as often as possible ' . 

• [ravel since the farmer in most 
cases rant do mueh traveling, go 
places for him. 

• Explanation of the farmer- prob- 
lems to his customer- in the city. 

• Season this with friend-hip. >\m- 
path) and respect. 

An unusual results stor> from 
WQAM, Miami, where the Junior 
Museum credit- a week of announce- 



NOW ... Hooper and Pulse Agree! 





Radio Station in Houston is 



BY AN EVEN WIDER MARGIN! 

Hooper Oct. and Nov. 1956 

Monday thru Friday Monday thru Friday 

7 A.M.— 12 Noon 12 Noon— 6 P M. 



KNUZ 



25.8 



Net. 


Sta. 


"A" - 


- 10.4 


Net. 


Sta. 


"B" - 


- 9.2 


Net. 


Sta. 


"C" - 


- 15.3 


Net. 


Sta. 


"D" - 


- 14.1 


Ind. 


Sta. 


"A" - 


- 6.7 


Ind. 


Sta. 


"B" - 


- 5.1 


Ind. 


Sta. 


"C" - 


- 6.3 



KNUZ 



30.2 



Net. 


Sta. 


"A" - 


-11.4 


Net. 


Sta. 


"B" - 


- 6.3 


Net. 


Sta. 


"C" - 


- 12.1 


Net. 


Sta. 


"D" - 


- 9.0 


Ind. 


Sta. 


"A" - 


- 8.2 


Ind. 


Sta. 


"B" - 


- 6.3 


Ind. 


Sta. 


"C" - 


- 10.7 



«»»*!-•»- 




Now . . . K-NUZ is the leader by a GREATER 

MARGIN — Yet the rates are Low, Low, Low! 

loin the Rush for Choice Avails. 

In Houston the swing is to RADIO and 
Radio in Houston is . . . 




HOUSTON'S 24 HOUR MUSIC AND NEWS 



National Reps.: Forjoe & Co. — 

New York • Chicago • Los Angeles • 
San Francisco • Philadelphia • Seattle 



Southern Reps.: 

CLARKE BROWN CO.— 

Dallas • New Orleans • Atlanta 



IN HOUSTON, CALL DAVE MORRIS, jAckson 3-2S81 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 10." 







1,102,500 

people who spend 

$1,339,059,000. 

total retail sales 
(S.M. Buying Power) 

CBS FOR THE 




J*S THE BO* ' 






PAH' 1 



whbf: 

ROCK ISLAND, ILL., 

REPRESENTED BY AVERY-KNODEL '' 



BMI 



"Milestones" for 

February 

1?MI"« series of program 
continuities, entitled "Mile- 
stones," focuses the spot- 
light on important events 
and problems which have 
shaped the American scene. 
February's release features 
four complete half-hour 
sno ws — ready for immedi- 
ate us« smooth, well writ- 
ten scripts for a variety 
of uses. 
•ABE LINCOLN— FAMILY MAN" 
Born: February 12. 1809 
"THE STRIKINC ARM OF 
FREEDOM" 
Freedom Week 
February 12-22, 1957 
•VALENTINES DAY" 
February 14, 1957 
•AMERICAS FIRST 
ADMINISTRATION" 
George Washington 
Born: February 22, 1732 
"Milestone*" i~ available (»< 
commercial Bponaorship — > ee >"" 
local rtatton f«r detalla. 



■mm*. mm,,. 'w.< 
BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

NEW YORK * CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 
TORONTO • MONTREAL 



ments for bringing in 6,000 people to 
llic museum. 90 c /c of whom were first- 
time \ isitora . . . 

K.COH, Houston, in a recent drive 
fur the Texas Crippled Childrens Hos- 
pilal played host to the / Love Lucy 
cast. . . KHON, Honolulu, has been 
bought l>\ Shirley Louise Mendelson, 
a granddaughter of one of General 
Motors' founders. Purchase price at 
public auction was 875.000. Miss Men- 
delson has also been elected president 
of South Pacific Broadcasting Co. 

REPS 

Joseph J. Weed, of Weed & Co., said 
to clients in a message this week that 
local newscasts are among the highest- 
rated spot radio programs and that 
there is no substitute for them. He 
emphasized that local newscasts in 
many areas have long-established lis- 
tener followings Ear ahead of network 
news programs. Therefore, he felt, 
network attempts to make further in- 
roads into local station time for a fan- 
spreading of network telecasts offers 
no improvement over local stations' 
own newscasts and can disrupt the 
smooth flow 7 of balanced schedules. 

\\ eed went on to sa\ that network 
newscasts and commentary have their 
proper place on station schedules — 
but not in excess and not beyond regu- 
lar time periods as substitutes for local 
telecasts. That would be. in effect, like 
"substituting a New York newspaper 
for the regular hometown newspaper 
of a subscriber." 

COMMERCIALS 

How good a cartoon character will 
he make? This question may become 
a factor in the promotion of promising 
young businessmen, if the present 
trend in animated commercials con- 
tinues. 

Like one of the famous Piel Brothers, 
the new "P. J. Tootsie" 'a character 
created by Terry toons for Sweets Co.'s 
tv commercials) is fashioned after an 
executive of the sponsors firm. P. J. 
is currentU making his debut on CBS 
TV's Heckle & Jeckie show, also in 
spot commercials throughout the coun- 
try 

A unique experiment recently 
conducted hy Telestudios may 
forecast things to come. 

The New York film outfit beamed 
a microwave, closed-circuit broadcast 
of a tv commercial in production right 



into Young & Rubicam's viewing room. 
W ith the aid of two-way audio equip- 
ment, a sizable agency and client group 
was able to direct activity on the studio 
floor without setting foot outside of the 
Madison Ave. offices. 

Consolidated Film Industries will 
hold h\e more color seminars on the 
nexl five Tuesdays at its film plant, 
521 West 57th St.. New York. Semi- 
nars are open to ad agencies, networks, 
and tv film producers. 

FILM 

II no hitches develop — and none 
are expected — the 82 post-'48 
films acquired by Matty Fox are ex- 
pected to be shipped to stations bv next 
month. The 82 complete the package 
of 742 RKO films that Fox is distrib- 
uting to tv via C&C Tv. 

It is understood that, aside from a 
few minor legal steps that remain to 
be taken, the only formality is approval 
of the re-use payment formula by the 
membership of the Writers Guild of 
America, West. The WGA Council has 
recommended acceptance. Okav was 
previously obtained from SAG and the 
directors guild. 

A switch in the trend to feature 
film will take place at WOR-TV, 
New York. 

The independent outlet is dropping 
a feature show. Hour of Danger, and 
replacing it with half-hour films. 

Hour of Danger films, an RKO pack- 
age, has been running across-the-board 






THERE'S ONLY ONE LEADER.. 



K23LF-TV4 MONTANA 

THE CONTINENTAL DIVIDE STATION , BUTTE 



I 



SPONSOR • 19 JANUARY 1957 



(one film ■ week) in the 9:00-10:00 
p.m. period weekdays. Starting 21 
January, \\()|{ T\ will run five syndi 
cated 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ anil iimi one-houi mysten 
feat urea in that slot. 

I In- syndicated shows are O. Henry 
Playhouse and State Trooper, l»>ili 
in-i run; Crusader, first run off net- 
work; Stai tttraction, tOnl Theatre 
rei uns; and U m in the In . a British 
documentary, shifted from another 
time pel iod on \\ I Hi I \ . 

Lipton has ahead) bought the first 
three ~-l i ■ » w - for four weeks \i.i V&R. 



\\ arner Bros, h ill begin a majoi 
building program next month with a 

It ,000 two-storj and -parking -level 

structure to house independent pro- 
ducers and it- nun stall working <>n 

\l'.< l\ shows . . . kBC Film Syn- 
dication expansion has forced the 
In in to move to larger quarters, 
located in New i- ork City's Paramount 
Building. 

Official Films has completed nego- 
tiations with Theatrical Enterprises to 
distribute Golf with the Champions, a 
series of :>') half-hours. This marks 
the entrj i>f both firms into sports pro- 
graming . . . CHympia Film has com- 
pleted ihr first 18 of a continuing 
Beries of four-minute film Bhorts for 
children entitled The Little Tun Shop. 

STOCK MARKET 

Following slocks in air media and 

related fields will be listed each issue 
with quotations for Tuesday tins week 
and Tuesday the week before. Quota- 
tions supplied 1>\ Merrill Lynch, 
Pierce. Feiiner and Keane. 



Vew ) 


orl, >'/<>< 1. 


Exchange 






Tues, 


I ne~. 


Nel 


Stock 


8 Jan. 


1"> Jan. 


( Ihange 


MUM 




-J :; , 


-1 


\ 1 &T 


176% 


176% 




\\cc> 


: 


6% 


- % 


< BS "A" 


32% 


32% 




Columbia Pic. 


17% 


18% 


m 


Loe\N - 


20% 


21 


• : > 


Paramount 


29 


28% 


- % 


EN \ 


34% 


33% 


-l's 


Storei 


26% 


26'. 


- 's 


20th-Foi 


23% 


24% 


1', 


^ arner Bros. 


28% 


28 


- >K 


W estinghouse 


55% 


ss 


- 3 4 


American 5 


Exchange 




Allied \ rt i~t - 


■ W 


3% 


- % 


' &< v u[>er 


1 


1 




< rouell-l oilier 


7*s 


7% 


'. 


DoMont Labs. 


4% 


5 


+ H 


Guild Films 


- 


1% 


- % 


\l\ 


8% 


8% 


- 's 


SPONSOR • 


1 ( ) JANUARY 195' 






The Great Man 's voice, 
like a silken scarf. . . 

wound round the livi a of 

millions of his listi m rs...and madt 

them captives of his charm. 

Charm that could s< 11 tin m 

a nything . . . cigan tt< s, toothpaste, 

hair tonic, soap ... a nything as 

long as it was "his" brand. 

Thin loved his simpU wisdom, 
his homely wit, his humble 
philosophy. But they didn't know him. 

Or was there something else 
behind that warm smile? 

Ask Jiis wife . . . his sometime girl 
friends. Talk to his press agent. 
His hand leader. His business 
manager. Look for the people who 

knew him . . . little and big. 

Of all, only one man had the 
coinage to sift through his deeds... 
good or evil... to piece together 
tin twisted threads of Iiis 
tangled life. . . to shore him 
as he really was... 



Universal-International presents 



JOSE 

ferrer nm 









<* 




THE GREAT MAN 

From tf I ling novel bij Al Morgan 

CO-STARRING 

DEAN JAGGER • KEENAN WYNN • JULIE LONDON • JOANNE GILBERT 
and ED WYNN with JIM BACKUS • RUSS MORGAN • ROBERT FOULK 



NOW 



PLAYING AT THE SUTTON 1 HlAI RE NEW YORK CITY 



.o 





is number 1 

in Duluth & Superior 



AUDIENCE 

Ask to see our new Hooper Survey . . . showing 
WEBC ahead of all other Duluth-Superior Sta- 
tions Monday thru Friday. 7 am to 6 pm. 

PROGRAMS 

Music, News and Sports, supplementing NBC 
Network's best .... worked bv a staff totaling 
over 50 years of announcing experience. 

RESULTS 

WEBC originated the nationally recognized 
••FILL PACE SPOT PBOCRAM" .... out- 
pulling all other local media in results per dol- 
lar. Cost per thousand is below all competition. 



Contact GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY COMPANY 



SPONSOR • 19 JANUARY 1957 



W'fuit'i happening in I . S. Government 
that affects $pon$oT$, agencies, ttationt 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



19 JANUARY 

Ce»yrl|ht 1137 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Stepped op Government activity in 1 1 1 «- antitrust and false advertising fields 
is promised in the President's budget request for the fis< al year 1958 (which starts 1 July 
1957). 

Tne Ju-tif«- Department antitrusl division i- down for an increase of 1216,350, with 
a total budget of 1 3,785,1 MX). 

FTC would gel 16,250,000, an increase of $700,000 over the current fiscal year ($1,223,- 
700 would be devoted to probing deceptive advertising practices; the antimonopoly division 
woul.l get $3,340,750). 

Tin- FCCs requested appropriation is $8,950,000, an increase of 11,122,000 over 
fiscal 1957. Onl\ explanation offered for tli<- substantial tilt: . . . "primarily to meet prob- 
lems resulting from advances in technology and expanding use of radio and television. M 



Pari of the FTC's increase will be used to monitor commercials and tape- 
record ads believed to be in violation of government regulation-. 

Much of the work will be undertaken after complaints b\ the public. Such complaints 
have increased since the FTC announced its monitoring plans a while back. 

Complaints will be directed against advertisers — not against stations. 



The FCC would rather not get into the monitoring business. 

Sen. Warren Magnusson (D., Wash.) has asked the FTC and FCC to establish liaison 
to ferret out stations which accept too much questionable advertising, but the FCC is going 
along reluctantb. 

FCCs point of view: it doesn't have — nor want — censorship powers. 



No action will be taken by the FCC to change the multiple-owTiership rules 
until after 30 June. 

The commission received a report from its network study committee, recommending the 
multiple-ownership rule be tightened because of the dangers of concentrations of control over 
broadcast media. 



FCC chairman McConnaugbey has asked the Senate Commerce Committee not 
lo disturb the status quo with respect to the divided antitrust responsibilities of 
the FCC and the Justice Department. 

Sen. Magnusson had submitted an "'urgent*' list of questions based on FCC approval of 
the NBC-'w estinghouse Philadelphia-Cleveland sale-trade and the Justice Department's subse- 
quent court action against it. 

McConnaugbey told Magnusson: Liaison between FCC and Justice is getting -tronger 
all the time; hence no formal statement should be drafted between the two agencies, nor is 
there anv necessity for new laws. 



Three bills affecting tv have been introduced in the present session of Con- 
gress: 

• Sen. John Bricker is again seeking the regidation of the networks by the FCC. 

• Rep. Dollinger (D.. N.V. i again wants "false advertising" probed on tv. 

• Sen. Pastore (D.. R.I.I asks that the Senate Commerce Committee be given an additional 
$250,000 for investigations this vear. including a blanket look-see into tv. 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 



77 



DELIVERING 

from PITTSBURGH to HARRISBURG 




wfbg-tv is FIRST! 




World's Best Movies : WFBG-TV has exclusive rights 
to the great MGM, Warner Bros., 20th Century-Fox 
and RKO feature films that have topped all com- 
petition in market after market. 



WFBG-TV is FIRST! 




Network Shows: Only basic CBS-TV station cover- 
ing the area, WFBG-TV also carries the outstanding 
ABC-TV programs. WFBG-TV delivers 13 of the top 
20 shows. 



WFBG-TV is FIRST! 




Coverage Superiority: 76,701 more TV homes in 
combination with Pittsburgh than any other station 
combination in the area. Less waste, less duplica- 
tion, more mileage for your TV dollar! 



wfbg-tv is FIRST! 



Audience Superiority : In this area covering 76,701 
more TV homes — from sign on to sign off, seven 
days a week — WFBG-TV delivers average ratings 
30.1% greater than nearest competitor; 71.4% 
more quarter-hour firsts. 

For top-audience availabilities on WFBG-TV, check BLAIR-TV or Triangle's National Sales Office today! 



Sources: ARB 29-County Coverage Study, March 1956/ARB, Altoona, November 1956 
ARB, The United States Television Audience, December 1956 



OP AUDIENCE 







TRIANGLE STATION 




WFSL-AMFMTV 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

WNBF-AMFMTV 

BINGHAMTON, NEW YORK 

W H G B - A M 

HARRISBURG, PENNSYLVANIA 

WFBG-AM «TV 

ALTOONA, PENNSYLVANIA 

WNHC-AMFMTV 

NEW HAVEN-HARTFORD, CONN. 



operated by: Radio and Television Div. / Triangle Publications. Inc. / 46th & Market Sts., Philadelphia 39. Pa. 
WFIL-AM.FM.TV. Philadelphia. Pa. / WNBF-AM • F M • T V . Binghamton, N.Y. 
WHGB-AM, Harrisburg, Pa. / WFBG-AM • TV, Aitoona, Pa. / WNHC-AM • FM • TV. New Haven-Hartford. Conn, 
s Office, 48 5 L r - 



A roundup of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



19 JANUARY 

Copyright 1957 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INO. 



MeCann-Erickson may get a place at the General Food's table one of these 
days. 

The two, anyway, have had some extended talks. 

For a long time, the bulk of the GF account has been divided between Young & Rubi- 
cam and Benton & Bowles. GF president Charles Mortimer in his last annual report 
put the company's ad spending at $75 million. 



Disturbing (to say the least) to the recently appointed head of a network 
subsidiary is the entry of an efficiency "watchdog" into his Coast operation. It's the 
parent company's idea. 

The home office thinks he ought to welcome the guidance and assistance. But the exec- 
utive appears worried not only by the implications but by the scare it might throw over 
local morale. 



Failures to pay time bills are rare in national spot; but when a sponsor does 
walk, the obligations left behind can be sizable. 

The latest in this category is a Pennsylvania hosiery firm, which went in heavily for 
pre-Christmas mail-order campaigning. 

One station is now on the hook for about $28,000. 

As an afterthought, the stations and rep involved are asking themselves how come they 
hadn't the foresight to check the firm's credit. 



A Florida commercial film outfit has launched an emotional pitch that agency- 
men may find hard to tune out during the next month or two. 

Listen to this from the firm's sales letter: 

"The temperature in Miami today is sixty. The sun is shining. There is none of that 
white stuff on the ground that so delights little boys with sleighs but which brings most 
outdoor picture making to a halt. 

"You can shoot pictures in Florida and edit them in New York. . . ." 



Remember the days when every network advertiser had his own program, 

and the rate of product-show identification was so high that a program often was credited 
with a product's sensational success? 

Many a buyer of alternate sponsorship these days still dreams of such notable product- 
show combinations as: 



Alka Seltzer National Barn Dance 

Anacin Easy Aces 

Barbasol Singin' Sam 

Campagna The First Nighter 

Chase & Sanborn Major Bowes 

Gulf Oil We the People 

Ipana Fred Allen 

Jell-0 _ - Jack Benny 

Jergens _ Walter Winchell 

Johnson Wax .Fibber McGee & Molly 
Kraft Cheese Kraft Music Hall 



Lady Esther Wayne King 

Lucky Strike B. A. Rolfe 

Maxwell House Showboat 

Ovaltine Orphan Annie 

Pabst Beer Ben Bernie 

Pep Jack Armstrong 

Pepsodent Amos 'n' Andy 

Ralston Tom Mix 

Spry .Aunt Jenny 

Texaco Ed Wynn 

Turns - Pot o' Gold 



80 



SPONSOR • 19 JANUARY 1957 



NESTLE'S TV PLAN 

11 ontinued from page 25) 

Having two programs helps to bal- 
ance "Hi the inevitable occasional dips 
thai one 01 i In- othei -Inm m.i\ -ut- 
ter. Foi instance, as Don * .nU puts 
it. M5( I \ pot "bare flesh and watei 
opposite Oh Susanna with its Esther 
\\ illiams spectacular last fall. The 
Gale Storm -h<>\\ did take .1 dive thai 
week, but recovered in the subsequent 
week. 

Merchandising vehicles: "The 
food trade is particularl] tv-con- 
scious," says Don Cady. "Grocers 
bave seen products ^" f i < >ni nowhere 
to tremendous \ « > 1 u 1 1 n • .1- a result of 
television. Therefore, identification 
with network t\ show sponsorship is 
important to us." 

However, the emphasis in identifica- 
tion has shifted somewhat for Nestle 
in the past year. The Nestle Co. was 
usually identified with one show at a 
time, which it merchandised to the 
hilt. For instance, Nescafe co-spon- 
sored The Jackie Gleason Slum- for 
some years, and then Stage Show. 
These programs provided highly mer- 
rlia n disable personalitic-. 

I nder the diversification plan, the 



Nestle i o. bas several merchandise ble 
personalities al the same time and be- 
comes identified h iili more than one t\ 
propert) . It's no longei a question of 
seeking j • i • - - 1 i l_* ^- through sponsorship 
of on.- major name, but rather oi 
spreading the promotional and mer- 
chandising effort ovei ■ widei numbei 
of propei i ies. 

Diversification means something to 
Nestle in it- method of operation as 

well as in it- approach to network 

u buj ing. 

■\\ e like to work with three agen- 
cies," Don Cadj told sponsor. "This 
form of 'diversification' brings togeth- 
er the complex of judgment, experi- 
ence and know-how from three differ- 
ent groups of creative mind-. It re- 
duce- the ii-k in an area where the 
dolku expenditure is so great Each 
individual agency's experience with 

othei manufacturer-" products and 
problems brings wider scope to their 

thinking for us." 

How due- the \e-tle Co. correlate 
the work of it- three agencies? 

Initial advertising -trate-\ is gen- 
eralh mapped out h\ the Nestle plans 
group under Don Cad] as titular 
chairman. This group ma\ or ma\ 



ri"t in> lude repn Bcntati • tli>- 

depending upon the problem 

undei id-' n--i.il h - usual!) i om- 

posed of some eight to In men. includ- 

produi i managei », the Nesth 
ad managei and merchandising n 

Bui men from othei departments 
ma) 1"- called in t"". I bi instant 
ma) I"- necesaar) to bring in someone 
from the sales office oi a field man. 
prot uremenl people "i home > ■> ono- 

nii-l-. 

Heres how the system works on a 
specifit problem: 

l.a-i \ ear, the Hal Roai h Studios 
submitted a t\ program idea to Bryan 
Houston. Vftei di* ussing the i<l«-.i 
with the agency, Nestle Co. decided to 
go a Btep further. Hal Roai b Studios 
then sent along scripts to the Nestle 
I he compan] pkms group liked 
the idea for several reasons. 

"Our products are used b) tl i 
tire family," says Cady. "Therefore 
we like t\ programing with family- 
appeal. This show was a situation 
comedy, and we felt this would give 
us broad family \ i<-w ing." 

Furthermore, Nestle executives felt 
that the stai of the -how. <..il-- Storm, 
had proved herself on u with h<-r track 




/•'• bruary tSth at tin Waldorf-Ash 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 



81 



A/OIV EVEN MORE THAN EVER 

Stocfaott't Tfttet Ai4te*ted t& Station 
HOOPER JtAD/O AUDIENCE INDEX 



STOCKTON, CALIF. 



JANUARY- MARCH, 1956 



MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 
7:00 A.M. -12:00 NOON 


RADIO 

SETS 

IN USE 


c 


N 


KSTN 


A 


M 


OTHER 
AM & FM 


SAMPLE 
SIZE 


l»f.8 


17.9 


"♦.2 


47.2 


13.0 


9.3 


8.W 


9,707 


MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 
12:00 N00N-6:O0 P.M. 


RADIO 
SETS 
IN USE 


c . 


rk 


KSTN 


A 


M 


OTHER 
AM & FM 


SAMPLE 
SIZE 


10. SJ 


20.7 


7.3 


35.0 


15.1 


9.5 


12 .h 


12,026 




Spring 1956 Hooperatings 
show KSTN increases dominance 
of Stockton Radio Audience. 

*America's 92nd Market 



Represented by Hollingbery 



SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA'S PtOttee/l RADIO STATION 








THE ONE THEY LISTEN TO 
MOST ... IS THE ONE TO 
BUY! 

In Roanoke and Western Virginia 
—that's WDBJ 

Your Peters, Griffin, Woodward "Colonel" 
has the whole, wonderful story 



AM 960 KC 

fM 94«9 mc 




Owned and Operated by TIMES-WORLD CORPORATION 



PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD, INC., National Representatives 



record on My Little Margie, which 
had pulled satisfying ratings against 
such formidable competition as Ar- 
thur Godfrey. She had also become a 
recording star, thus adding to her 
following. 

"We then did considerable re- 
search." says Cady. "We checked on 
the star endorsement and merchandis- 
ing possibilities, and researched the 
composition of her audience. When we 
said 'yes' to the Roach Studios, thev 
went ahead with the pilot film." 

Up to that stage, only Don Cadv 
and the Bryan Houston agency had 
been involved. When the pilot film 
was completed, however, Cady called 
in members from all three agencies, 
screened the pilot for them and asked 
for their comments and recommenda- 
tions. The screening was attended by 
the heads of the radio-tv departments, 
by account men and tv commercials 
producers. And each made verbal and 
written comments to improve the show 
format. 

When the final format was agreed 
upon, the studio went ahead with the 
series. Then followed more agency 
meetings to lay out production and 
commercial schedules and to work out 
the opening and closing of the shows. 

"\\ e feel that this system of putting 
together many creative minds pro- 
duced the best results," savs Cadv. As 
proof, he pointed to the 1-8 December 
Nielsen, which gives Gale Storm a 28.8 
rating against 27.6 for The Lawrence 
Welk Show on ABC TV and 19.0 for 
Caesar's Hour on NBC TV. 

"Now we screen the scripts on the 
two nighttime show* to make sure that 
nothing conflicts with the other agen- 
cies' Nestle products," Bill Templeton 
told SPONSOR. 

The agency of record on particular 
shows gets the network and program 
billings and works out the apportion- 
ing of the other agencies' commercial 
time in terms of billings and commis- 
sions. For the two nighttime shows. 
Bryan Houston is the agency of rec- 
ord, while McCann handles the four 
niu daytime shows, which are current- 
1\ being used onlv bv Nestle products 
handled by McCann. 

■"There are no policy problems in 
our working with the other agencies," 
said the Nestle account supervisor 
from one of the agencies. "The only 
problems are such minor mechanical 
snags like where we should get to- 
gether. But if the client's in one 
shop, that's where we usually go." ^ 



82 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 



Casting Talent 

i Continued from page '• I I 

lion i" \ < mi i product pitch thai jrou 
i.inK gel from ■ model. • * i In au- 
ditioning, direct \ ..hi actoi through 
hia role. (4) rry to set up \ our < last- 
ing office as nearl) in replica ol the 
sound stage .1- possible. (5) Give the 
actor .1 storyboard to look .11 : a script 
is nut enough. 

Ben Berenberg, executh e pi odu< ei 
for Screen Gema in the East, says, 
" I'hr old ordei "I using models in 
preference to actors is changing. This 
has led man] models to stud) acting 
and voice, taothei trend is awaj from 
separate voice dubs to go with faces. 
Since SAG introduced its re-use pay- 
ment provisions, it's better business to 
gel the same actor to do face and 
voice. Such transitions put a new re- 
sponsibility on the casting director. 
He mu-i keep up nol onlj with new 

talent but with old talent who have 

impro\ ed their acts. 

Each commercial has its own prob- 
lems iti casting because each ma] in- 
volve Bpecial types ol actors. Here are 

a tew specific tip-: 

► Star announcer: In casting for this 

"part," hear in mind thai a well-known 

star should retain his acting personal- 
it) to be effective. He should nol be 

himself, hut rather the type with which 

be has come to be identified, accord- 
ing to Fred Golt, ol Harris-Tuchman 

Productions in Hollywood. In select- 
ing a commercial personality who ma) 
come to be associated with the prod- 
uct, make -ure before casting what the 
sponsors prejudices are. Mustache-, 
for example, are general*) frowned on 

b) sponsors because the) feel the) in- 




jei t a note ol insini erity. I f .1 < om 
men mI i- aimed at the -mall fi j . then 
\oiill need i" cast someone who isn't 
too adult 111 manner, \nnouncers with 
kid-appeal are haul to find. 
► Children'. "You've gol t" \s < » 1 1 \ 
about casting kid-.' -a\- Shamus < ul- 
bane, t\ 1 ommerciala produi ei . "W atch 
nut foi those confident-looking ones; 
the) often freeze oi blow-up on cam- 
era. \ good teal i- t" tell the kid a 

joke. No mallei how had the joke, if 

he doe-n'l lauyll watch OUt \ "il ha\e 
made a warm advance to the child and 

he has rejected it. lie will probabl) 



\ ..11 trouble on sta • \ 
dire* t"i must be somethin child 

psychologist. He's got to mm in. e the 
child that he's nol reall) an adult and 
that the work they re about !■• tackle 
1- a ne which they'll pla 

gethei and have fun doing. 
► Inimation 1 oit t < asl ing th< 
foi a cat i". .il sound ti a< k 1 alls t"i a 
lot of < are. Pii k an at i"i h b 
completely uninhibited, foi the 
in an animation 1 ommeri ial must be 
done u iili a humoi thai 1- broadei and 
more \ igorous than would be used 

e\ en ill ll\ e-acl i' ill 1 .iineiK . ^ 



AXIMIJM POWFJl 

WIBW-TV is now operating on the top 
limits of power allowed by the FCC — a 
smashing 316,000 watts. 



MAXIMUM III H.IM 

Already WIBW-TV's antenna is at its 
limit of height — 1010 feet above the 
rolling Kansas prairie. 



COVERAGE 



HP 





. . _—V ~ -"" "" ~— ** " 


- " J " 


y^-^T^ ' - 


— r^i L. 


f / /*^ -^^j*~K. \ - - 


/ 


■ 1 / ' ' _ 


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1 . 7 czato ♦ s _f^PK_| 


\ 


V \ - 1~ ■ t 


r "1 




-^J^t^^sy^* 








■ 




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I__k^-p P p 


' T -L 



WIBW-TV absolutely dominates 20 Kansas counties. We lay down 
a clear picture far beyond Kansas Cirv and St. Joseph, Mo., into a 
total of 586,022 TV homes. Check the new A.R.B. for the Topek- 
AREA. See the across-the-board preference for WIBW-TV 



"Nobody goes out anymore, since 
we started piping KRIZ Phoenix 
into the rooms!" 



TOPEKA, KANSAS 

Sen Ludy, Gen. Mgr. 

VV/BW & WIBW-TV in Topcko 

Rep. Capper Publications, Inc. 
CBS ABC 




The Kansas V*w font 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 



83 




STACKS OF 
BUSINESS! 



Smokestacks have always been 
a symbol of activity in our Ohio 
River Valley. They came to us 
first aboard the picturesque 
sternwheelers that opened this 
region to phenomenal growth. 
They stayed to multiply and mul- 
tiply above busy mills and fac- 
tories whose industrial worth to- 
day — in the Huntington- 
Charleston heart alone — ex- 
ceeds one billion dollars! 
Nowhere in America is there 
such a panorama of business un- 
der full steam as in the 100-plus 
counties served by the four-state 
span of WSAZ-TV. Here live 
nearly a million families with an- 
nual buying power close to four 
billion dollars — a symbol of 
booming productivity making 
this America's 23rd TV market. 
Your advertising cuts a smart 
bow wave when you consign it 
to WSAZ-TV, only TV station 
covering the whole area.. Any 
Katz office can write the ticket. 




HU/STIMGTOM-CHARLESTOM, W. VA. 

Affiliated with Radio Stations 

WSAZ, Huntington & WGKV, Charleston 

LAWRENCE H. ROGERS, PRESIDENT 

Represented by The Katz Agency 






84 




Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 



Hoyt Andres, manager of WSFA-TV, 
Montgomery, Ala., has been named man- 
ager of WKY AM-TV, Oklahoma City, ac- 
cording to an announcement made by P. 
A. Sugg, executive v.p. of the WKY Tele- 
vision System, Inc. Andres joined WKY 
in June, 1946 as radio program manager. 
Later he became administrative assistant 
and was appointed assistant manager in 
1951. In 1955 he became manager of Montgomery stations after 
their purchase by WKY. Eugene B. Dodson, who has been acting 
manager of WKY AM-TV, will replace Andres as manager of 
WSFA-TV. Dodson joined WKY in June, 1949 as promotion man- 
ager. He was later appointed director of radio operations, adminis- 
trative assistant, and assistant manager. He has served as acting 
manager since July 1955. Promotions are effective in February. 

Kenneth Runyon, formerly director of 
research for Gardner Advertising Co., St. 
Louis, has been named director of the de- 
partment of marketing. He succeeds War- 
ren Kratky who now becomes an account 
supervisor. The Gardner organization, 
which has concentrated on marketing and 
merchandising, was among the first to 
recognize and appreciate the need to ex- 
pand in the direction of marketing services. Runyon has been a 
member of the Gardner media and research departments since June 
of 1950. In his new post of marketing director, he will coordinate 
the activities of those two departments. Edwin J. Gross' appointment 
to succeed Runyon as director of research has also been announced. 
Gross joined Gardner in 1955. Prior to joining Gardner, Gross 
worked in marketing research and consulting in the Baltimore area. 

John H. Mitchell, vice president of ABC, 
has been appointed general manager of 
KGO and KGO-TV, the network's wholly- 
owned tv and radio stations in San Fran- 
cisco. Mitchell will work in close coopera- 
tion with Earl J. Hudson, ABC's vice 
president in charge of its Western Division 
in Los Angeles, in order to facilitate 
greater interchange of local programing 
between the San Francisco and Los Angeles stations. Prior to his 
San Francisco appointment, Mitchell served as special assistant to 
Leonard H. Goldenson, AB-PT president. He was named a network 
v.p. in 1954 and was assigned to ABC TV in New York at that time. 
He originally joined ABC in 1953 as vice president in charge of 
WBKB, the network's owned tv station in Chicago. Before coming 
to ABC, Mitchell served as an executive with Balaban & Katz. 





SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 



hen von want to confer about the of the Washington 

market, get in touch with \V I OP Radio W IOI' | 
(1) the largest aveiage shaie ol audience l2j the most quarter-hour wins 
(3) Washington's most popular personalities and (4) ten t: 
the power of any radio station in the Washington 



Op«rat«<J by Th« Wftthmglon f*o»i Broadcast 

RepratcnUd by l.BI KMio »po< »•'•% 





there's 
something 
special 



about . . . 




dOdM 

Xq pajuasajdajj 

aayuDA — jvmnj^ — jgy 

s »ba\ 000'9 — sapAooi!5i oit'I 

moipauuoQ 'pjojjJBH 



Reps at work 



Ceorge W. Kupper, vice president, Win. G. Rambeau Co., New 
York, thinks that advertising agencies are not making the profit they 
should in spot radio because agency paper work is detailed and 
cumbersome. "The agency office staff often spends hours, and some- 
times da\s. preparing an individual 4A contract for each station 
with which it has bought spot," 
George says. "Most of the time 
the contract is sent after the sched- 
ule has begun. In effect, it is onlv 
a matter of form, and a more 
practical contractual arrangement 
should be made." George cites the 
Wm. Esty agency which has al- 
ready eliminated the 4A contract 
procedure in spot buying. The 
agency sent to each station a du- 
plicate mutual agreement that the 
4A stipulations would be observed 
automatically in all future agreements without the forwarding of a 
separate contract. The reps handle all the paper work since all that 
is needed is the confirmation to the agency that the sale has been 
completed. To initiate a similar all-agency practice, the reps should 
prepare a comprehensive uniform broadcast order form to replace 
the 4A contract that could be easily processed in the agencies." 




it's 8L 

TELE-BROADCASTERS 

station 



TELE-BROADCASTERS, Inc. 

41 East 42nd Street 
New York 17, N. Y. 
MUrray Hill 7-8436 

H. Scott Killgore, President 

Owners and Operators of 

KUDL, Kansas City, Missouri 
WPOP, Hartford, Conn. 
WKXL, Concord, New Hampshire 
WKXV, Knoxville, Tennessee 



in making broat 






Al Larsen, Avery-Knodel, Inc., New York, reports that enlightened 
account executives and timebuyers cooperate and even encourage the 
representative in direct contact with the advertiser. "Thev realize 
that the representative can often beneficially influence the client 
advertising decisions," Al says. "Recently, for 
example, one of the country s lead- 
ing men's hair preparation ac- 
counts was seriously considering 
dropping its spot tv advertising 
to sponsor a network tv show. 
Thev were weighing identification 
with a major show against the 
flexibility and low-cost-per-1.000 
of spot tv. Since their budget for 
spot was 83.000,000. this was a 
decision that would affect the 
entire spot business. The advertis- 
ing agency, however, fa\ored spot 
and we agreed that a personal call by me on the client might clarifx 
their understanding of our medium. With the help of Avery- 
Knodel's promotion department. I prepared an individual presenta- 
tion and called on them. The information I provided, I believe, 
was an important consideration in their later decision — which was 
Id continue in spot. They have since personally thanked me." 







SPONSOR 



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n ,ir controls lor im us. brightness, and gain. 





jobs... 

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The Vidicon is.i hard-working "one man band"— low in cost, too. 
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This highly adaptable, easy handling camera fills the bill as: 

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\ Ou use the VIDICON anywhere... where maximum range is not 
required such as sports events and conventions coverage. 

Speedy Change Between Film and Live Work. 

The VIDICON CAMERA is only 9 inches long, 7 inches high- 
Weighs 10 pounds. It mounts directly on the Optical Multiplexer 
— handles tour film sources that interchange through tixed mir- 
rors and adjustable beam splitters. Or, the VIDICON ( \MERA 
tits into the VIEW'FINDER for live camera work. ..you have a 
four lens camera turret operated from the rear, with only three 
other controls: tor brightness, gain, and camera focus. 

Delivers Sharp Performance — with Only Ten Tubes. 
There are only ten tubes in the VIDICON ( \ME R AS ama/ingK 
simple circuit — yet the VIDICON gives a camera resolution ot 
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Its Automatic Gain Control maintains constant output through a 
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Progress /s Our Most /mportant 'Product 



GENERAL 




ELECTRIC 



SPONSOR 



Sound agency relations 

It's usually the stories of friction between clients and 
agencies which make the headlines but earlier this month 
Don Cady, Nestle's advertising v. p., pulled a switch by pub- 
licly praising the teamwork of the company's three agencies. 

This we like. 

To Bryan Hon ton, McCann-Erickson, and Dancer-Fitz- 
gerald-Sample our congratulations for working in close rap- 
port on a joint project (more of this on page 23 this issue). 
And to Don Cady applause for a lesson in good agency 
relations and acknowledgment of a job well done. 

Advertising serves the public 

Two public service campaigns by the advertising industry 
— one national, the other local — have made quite an im- 
pression on us. 

The benefits of advertising will be explained to the public 
through various media and in many ways during Advertising 
Week starting 10 February. Perhaps the dominant impres- 
sion will be made by a live and animated one-minute film 
commercial supervised by Cunningham & Walsh, the volun- 
teer Advertising Week task force agency. Financed by NBC, 
ABC, and CBS the spot will be distributed by the networks 
to their affiliated stations while independent stations can get 
it from the New York office of the Advertising Federation of 
America, co-sponsors of Advertising Week with the Adver- 
tising Association of the West. TV Spots in Los Angeles 
designed animation for the opening and Elliott-Unger-Elliott 
filmed the live portion in New York. 

In Boston WBZ-TV in January unveiled its "Let Freedom 
Ring" campaign to be integrated into the station's program- 
ing throughout 1957. Don McGannon, president of West- 
inghouse Stations, has backed General Manager Frank 
Tooke's idea in a substantial way — by allocating $50,000 to 
the project. 

WBZ-TV hopes to point up through commercials, news, 
programs and in every way at its command that freedom is 
a privilege to be enjoyed and appreciated. 



THIS WE FIGHT FOR: A complete state- 
ment of sponsor's 1957 editorial platform ap- 
pears under the heading "This We Fight For" 
in this issue, page 32. These are causes for 
which sponsor will campaign in future articles. 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Sorry: A fast-talking agency gal- 
Friday phoned a "to-go" food order 
for herself and several co-workers. She 
whipped through a long recital includ 
ing coffees black and regular, cheese 
burgers, hams-on-rye, milk and Danish 
gave her name, agency name and ad 
dress, floor number, then concluded 
"How soon can you send it up?' 
"I can't," said a patient voice. "This 
is a jewelry store." 




Youth: The Association of Advertis- 
ing Men and Women will nominate the 
"outstanding young advertising man of 
the year" from those under 45. It's 
refreshing to get Madison Avenue's 
definition of "young." 

Light? Pilfered from Jeremy Sprague, 
buying supervisor for Cunningham & 
Walsh, a match book. Its outside 
cover reads: "The Man From Cun- 
ningham & Walsh." Inside cover is 
blank except for one word: "Memo." 
Caution : If you've jotted down a girl's 
phone number and are about to offer 
your wife a light — CLOSE COVER 
FOR SAFETY. 

Friend at court: At Fayetteville, 
N. C, Thomas Williams, clerk of Cum- 
berland Superior Court, .ruled a tele- 
vision set is a necessity in the average 
American home. He ordered a local 
bank, guardian for four little girls, to 
buy them a tv set after hearing the 
petition of the banks attorney which 
stated a tv "is not an item of luxury, 
but is the pinnacle of 20th Century 
communication." 

Definition: "Long Shot" is what you 
better stay off unless the tip is straight 
from the horse's mouth. 

Naturals: Still more station buys 
we'd like to see: Miltown Tranquil- 
izers on KALM (Thayer. Mo.); 
American Airlines on WING ( Davton, 
0.); Blue Cross on WARD (Johns- 
town, Pa.) : Revere Ware on KOOK 
I Billings. Mont. I : Springmaid Sheets 
on KOTN ( Pine Bluff. Ark. ) ; a local 
drive-in movie on KL DL ( Kansas 
City, Mo.). 

Hate: NBC Radio will begin a new 
program titled "Classical Music For 
People Who Hate Classical Music." // 
this sets a trend, we may soon have 
other show titles such as Quiz Show 
For People Who Can't Stand Quiz 
Shows, or Western For Horse-Haters. 



88 



SPONSOR 



19 JANUARY 1957 



Full Power 
NBC Affiliate 
316.000 Witts 



RED-HOT NEWS 



n is r m. 

SATURDAYS 

AND SUNDAYS 



WBAL-TV SHOWING FIRST-RUN 
FILMS IN BALTIMORE ON 

20th CENTURY THEATRE" 



Films Produced By 20th Century-Fox Studios 

Released For TV Viewing For First Time! 



TWO SHOWS EACH WEEK 

"20th Century Theatre" will be televised every Satui 
and Sunday night at 11:15 P.M. This series 'vill carry a 
salvo of advertising and publicity unprecedented in the 
Baltimore area. Billboards, newspaper ads, ^n-the-air 
promotions, signs on vehicles, and schedule cards distri- 
buted through Food and Drug Chains are a part of the 
backing this great film show will receive. 

PARTICIPATING 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

AVAILABLE 

A film series of such magnitude is sure to pro- 
duce a big audience. Get on the bandwagon now! 

Contact your nearest Petry office or 
WBAL-TV, 2610 N. Charles St., Baltimore, Md. 



The great day has arrived! The film library of 
20th Century-Fox studio has been tapped and 
epic-making pictures will be shown to viewers 
in the Baltimore area. These screen classics are 
still alive in the minds of the public . . . still as 
fresh and stirring as the day they first burst 
forth to set new standards in entertainment 
achievement. Films that reached the hearts of 
all America such as "Miracle on 34th St.", 
"Laura", "Lifeboat", "Tobacco Road", "How 
Green Was My Valley". Unforgettable casts 
. . . Academy Award Winners . . . Comedies . . . 
Dramas . . . Mysteries . . . will all be shown on 
this new series titled "20th Century Theatre". 
Here is a great opportunity for advertisers to 
hang their hats on a sure winner, a real 
audience-catcher. 

WBAL-TV 115 

CHANNEL 11 • BALTIMORE 

Nationally Represented by THE EDWARD PETRY CO., INC. 




TELEVISION 




f corU 







m . m >■• * u * o £ 






pis: 



^SJ^umm company 

GOT ^ 



2« JANUARY i • 5 
40' • copy • (10 • ymr 









OR 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS US 





years 



is a lot of 



TIME 



I ) mi mi; the last quarter cen lii ry. we have -.old lime for some 
of t li«* greatest radio and tele^ i>ion properties in Vmerica — 
hundreds of millions of dollar* worth. \> the original Ma- 
lion representative in the advertising industry, we are 
proud to have done this. alwa\* maintaining the hiiili prin- 
ciples on which our Com pa in \\a> founded. 

Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 

THE ORIGINAL STATION REPRESENTATIVE 

RK • CHICAGO • ATLANTA • DETROIT • LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANC, SCO • ST. LOUIS 




HOW Y&R MEDIA- 
BUYERS INVEST 
$200 MILLION 

^ Ml - .ill-int(|i i Inn- 
ing «\ -ii-ni ciIiIh ate?> 
it* tuiii ili Im iImI.iv h ill 
reappi a i-.il ol method, 
addition ol -ei \ ire- 

Page 27 



First spot radio 
$ figures by 
product category 

Page 32 

Spot tv sparks 
Nehi bottlers' 
expansion drive 

Page 34 

Television's 
impact on 
magazines 

Page 37 



sccon 



d in 



a series o 



f 1£ ad< 




INVENTIVE • RESPONSIBLE 

...and twelve months out of every year 
stations under the sign of MEEKER 
benefit by: 

INVENTIVE 

incentive inherent in the select 
limited list concept where every man 
can really know every station 
and every market. 

RESPONSIBLE 

reputation established among 
agencies for service, 
speed and accuracy. 





personalized 

selling 

of a 

limited list 



the meeker company, inc. 

radio and television station representatives 
new york - Chicago - san francisco - los angeles - Philadelphia 




Offering youngsters a giant opportunit) for education and 
travel i- the new l\ quiz Giant Step, sponsored l>\ Genera] 
Mill-. Veteran MC Berl Parks asks tli>' questions as children 
ii\ tin the top prize oi .1 four-yeai college scholarship plus a 
trip to foreign lands. Though contestants are -ill from seven t" 
seventeen years oi age, Giant Step provides a huge adull audi- 
ence tor the messages "I General Mill- and Bett) Crocker. 



How •.in mhi run four-coloi advertising in tradi magazines 
where color is not always available? American-Standard lim- 
it with these special four-page inserts l"i ii- Plumbing and 
Heating Division. Appearing regularl) in twenty-six plumbing 

and beating publicat -. these versatile coloi inserts .il-" 

serve .1- mailing pieces . . . men handising Amerit an-Standard 
products i" leading dealers and distributors across the I x 




to****** , 








«£#** 



1 



Last June, National Cranberrj Association began .1 market- 
by-market "blitz" campaign foi Ocean Spra) Jellied Cran- 
berry Sauce. Theme: "Cool and jellied cranberry sauce is a 
natural summer food bu> two cans, save five cents." B _ 
uun- ot the "blitz" were newspaper ads and radio spots. l'ul>- 
licity helped popularize new recipes «ith jellied cranberrj 
Bauce. Results "t tlii- "off-season" use promotion? A sellout! 




Earlier in the century, Koppers Company, [m 

tions as a designer and buildei of < hemical < ■ lants. 

1 1 "la \ . Koppers not only produces a wide range ol plasti 

products, metal products and dyestuffs, but also d< 

builds entire steel mills and chemical plants I bj BBDO 

Pittsburgh, junior spreads in The Saturday Evening P 

tin- fascinating storj of Koppers .1 BBD< > 1 li< al - 



BATTEN, BARTON, DURSTINE & OSBORN, INC., ADVERTISING 



NtW IOKK • ATI >M V 



■OSTO* . - 



KOU.TWOO0 



SPON-oK 



2(> .1 \m \k> L957 



26 January 1957 • Vol. 11, No. 4 



SPONSOR 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 



The Y&R media strategy 

27 After three years of operating under the all-media buying system, the No. 
One tv/radio agency finds its buyers function better on planning level 

An industry milestone: spot radio spending by product 

32 F°od and Tobaccos head the list in this just released SRA report by 
product category of spot radio users and how much they are spending 

Spot tv sparks Nehi expansion 

34 Successful franchise dealers in current market- attract new dealers in 
other markets. Nehi Corp., makers of Royal Crown, grows on this formula 

Television's impact on the magazines 

37 J ,lst because it has outstripped magazines in advertising dollar volume, 
must tv take the blame for publishing failures? Here is the answer 



FEATURES 



22 49th and Madison 

52 New and Renew 

58 \ r \\s & Idea Wrap-Up 

5 Newsmaker of the Week 
21 Reps at Work 
48 Sponsor Asks 
18 Sponsor Backstage 
72 Sponsor Hears 



9 Sponsor-Scope 
80 Sponsor Speaks 
55 Spot Buys 
80 Ten Second Spots 
14 Timebuyers at Work 
78 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 
46 Tv Results 
69 Washington Week 



In Next Week's Issue 



The coverage formula muddle 

How iinliv iilual agencies use the NCS in their timebuying and 
what the -tatinn reps suggest fer stabilizing these procedures 



Film section for 1957 

Whal an- the Latest trends in syndication and feature film? Every 
■ in ilii- phase of the t\ industry is explored in detail 









Editor and President 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

Vice-President-General Manager 
Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 

Executive Editor 

Miles David 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Senior Editors 

Alfred J. Jaffe 
Evelyn Konrad 
Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Assistant Editors 

Joan W. Holland 
Jack Lindrup 
Betty Van Arsdel 

Contributing Editors 

Bob Foreman 
Joe Csida 

Art Editor 

Phil Franznick 

Production Editor 

Erwin Ephron 

Photographer 

Lester Cc'e 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Advertising Director 

Arnold Alport 

New York Manager 

Charles W. Godwin 
Midwest Manager 

Kenneth M. Parker 

Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 
Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 
Promotion Manager 

Mort Winthrop 
Production Manager 
Jean L. Engel 
Advertising Staff 

Marilyn Krameisen 
Georqe Becker 

Administrative Coordinator 

Catherine Scott Rose 
Circulation Department 

Beryl Bynoe 

Emily Cutillo 

June Kelly 

Accounting Department 

Laura Oken 
Laura Datre 

Reader*' Service 

Betty Rosenfeld 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive. Editorial, 
Circulation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 
49th St. i49th & Madison) New York 17. 
N. Y. Telephone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. 
Chicago Office: 161 E. Crand Ave. Phone: 
Superior 7-9863. Los Angeles Office: 6087 
Sunset Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4- 
8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., 
Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: United 
States S10 a year. Canada and foreign 
$11. Single copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. 
Address all correspondence to 40 E. 49th 
St.. N. Y. 17. N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. 
Published weekly by SPONSOR Publications 
Inc. Entered as second class matter on 
the 29 January 1948 at the Baltimore 
postoffice under the Act of 3 March 1879. 

Copyright 1957 

Sponsor Publications Inc. 



I/lost of Arkansas Watches 



KTHV 



Channel 11 

LITTLE ROCK 

(and we have the MAIL to prove it!) 




KTHV gets viewing response from most of Arkansas — 47 counties 
to be exact! Take a good look at the mail map above. Notice that 
KTHV penetrates to all six surrounding states — and actually pulls 
mail from viewers in Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma and Texas. 

With 316,000 watts on Channel 1 1 and with tallest antenna in the Central 
South ( I ^56' above average terrain) KTHV sells most of Arkansas. 




Your Branham man has all the big KTHV facts. Ask him I 



316,000 Watts Channel 

Henry Clay, Executii t 1 'ice President 
B. G. Robertson. General Manager 

AFFILIATED WITH KTHS, LITTLE ROCK AND KWKH, SHREVEPOR 



© 




Now, 18 hours of 



MUSIC 



with 18 news shows daily on 

WJIM-RADIO 

Lansing, Michigan 






U w .i 



) 



f the week 



The news: kmii Foods has renewed foi anothei >J weeks, 
iponsorship oj the Krafl Television Hieatre "" VB( /->/ (Ae ll//i 
consecutive yeai n record without parallel m the medium. 

The newsmaker: John B. McLaughlin, directoi ol sales 
and advertising for kiali Foods, sums up 1956 .1- "".1 yeai ol 
critical and populai success foi kmit Theatre* \ success crowned 
I > \ the Sylvania award i" the program .1- the besl dramatii series 
oi 1956. 

"When we initiated the show in L947 we had the idea <>f a 
dramatic show based upon the qualit) i>t the Btor) rather than name 
stars, (liis idea is as sound todaj as it was then, says McLaughlin. 
In line \n i 1 1 1 this philosophy of the besl in Btor) material, la-t 
year the kmit Television Theatre 
$50fi00 Playwrights [ward was 
presented for the "besl original 
play" offered i>n the program 
during the \ ear ending 31 < October 
1956. 

"The idea here was for us to 

< atch tlir good Stories rather than 

lei othei shows gel them, and it 
has paid <>IT handsomer] in some 
exceptionall) fine scripts," ex- 
plain- McLaughlin. 

With the renewal of the \K ednes- 

, . . . 1 1 • John II. l/i I. hi, 

daj night senes and the intro- 
duction ol rhursdaj afternoon participations on NBC l\ (indi- 
cating the cost-per-1,000 "I daytime t\ has final!) gotten down 
to where Kraft considers it a good buy), Kraft has launched a 
double-barreled drive to sell the week-end shopper. The Kraft 
sales pitch, recognized as a perfect one E01 television, has changed 
little in the 11 years. 

"Our most successful commercial," McLaughlin says, "is -till 
the recipe demonstration which we tie-in with retail promotions. 
Our dealer- are told three-to-six week- ahead which items are going 
to be featured. We suggest that the) group these items on their 
shelves tor 'package' sales like Kraft marshmallows and fresh 
sweet potatoes i"i our sweet potato-pie recipe." 

Vlthough Krafl has a considerable investment in the Kraft Tele- 
vision Theatre (time and talent costs for the show last yeai were 
well over $5 million) and the series rate- tops in brand identifica- 
tion; the decision to renew was based mainl) on the Theatre's 
Strong position in relation to ether drama- and show-types. 

"'Our continued sponsorship of the series for 11 years," says 
McLaughlin, "doe- not indicate an inflexible advertising polic) ; 
the -how has undergone changes and has been streamlined. Bui 
when you have a eood idea, you're -mart to -lick with it." ^ 




SPONSOR 



26 i vm vry 1957 










ATLANTA 

DAIRY 

SALES 

UP 20% 



J. D. Gay, General Manager 
MISS GEORGIA DAIRIES, INC. 

of Atlanta, 
praises The Cisco Kid 

Sales are currently 
running approximately 
20° ■ above norma/ from 
the same number of 
wholesale accounts 
Cisco opened doors for 
us to put our products in 
one of the largest chains 
in this area As long 

as The Cisco Kid is 
available as a tv show. 
Miss Georgia Dairies, 
Inc will be proud to 
sponso- I 

Ask to see more success stories of 

JHE WORLDS SREATESJ SALESMAN! 

"THE CISCO KID" 





AGAtN 




HO 



WKRC Radio originally brought Waite Hoyt to Cincin- 
nati in 1942 to broadcast the Redlegs' entire schedule. 
He was an instant favorite with the fans and the listen 
ing public, and has been doing a better job each year. 
Background knowledge of the game, descriptive 
fluency, a perfect radio voice all combine to make 
Waite Hoyt the ideal man for the job. WKRC Radio is 
proud to have him on the air again. 



Originally, WKRC Radio brought Waite Hoyt and Bur- 
ger Beer together for the first time in 1942. They've 
been associated ever since. In the same way, baseball 
and Burger Beer are associated in the minds of the 
intensely loyal fans who listen to the Burger Base- 
ball Radio Network, of which WKRC becomes the origi- 
nating station. 




6AM-12M 



MONDA 
through 
FRIDA 



7 5 

6 AM 



(Pulse-Sept -Oct 1956) 



W& 




The Cincinnati Redtegs 

BASEBALL STATION ! 



BASEBALt, 


. PARADE 


NEWS BULLETINS 


3 minutes 


AVAILABLE 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


I minute 


AVAILABLE 


BASEBALL HIGHLIGHTS 


5 minutes 


SOLO 


(Jack Moran) 




sX»** 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


1 minute 


SOLO 


BATTER UP (Ed Kennedy) 


10 minutes 


SOLO 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


1 minute 


SOLO 



PLAY-BY-PLAY GAME BROADCAST -Waite Hoyt 

(Burger Beer) Jatk Moran 

ANNOUNCEMENT 1 minute SOLO 

SCOREBOARD (Ed Kennedy) 5 minutes SOLD 

ANNOUNCEMENT 1 minute AVAILABLE 

NEWS BULLETINS 3 minutes AVAILABLE 



*At Press Time 

Rates on Request 

Get the Facts from Kat2! 




FOR CIN NN»' IHEUI SNOTufR KfY] 



IT'S WKRC-TV 



usive CBS Schedule 



Ken Church. Vice President and N 

Don Chapin, Manager. New V 

RADIO CINCINNATI. Inc . o*r,ers and opeiatory of 

WKRC Radio and WKRC-TV in Cincinnati. Ohio, and 

WTVN Radio and WTVNTV in Columbus, Ohio. 




NEW, ADDITIONAL SURVEY PROOF: 
WNHC-TV — seven days a week, sign on to 
sign off — delivers average audiences 210% 
greater than top New York City station reach- 
ing any part of the area; 244% greater than 
Hartford; 174% greater than New Britain. 
Kail KATZ for the proof: ARB, Nov. 1956; 
PULSE, Oct. 1956; NIELSEN NCS #2, 1956. 



WNHC-TV 

NEW HAVEN-HARTFORD, CONN. 

Channel 8 

**"^ ^** ABC-TV* CBS-TV 

Represented by KATZ 

operated by: Radio and Television Div. / Triangle Publications, Inc. / 46th & Market Sts., Philadelphia 39, Pa. 
WFIL.AM«FM«TV, Philadelphia, Pa./WNBF-AM»FM»TV.Binghamton, N.Y. 
WHGB-AM, Harrisburg, Pa. / WFBG-AM • TV, Alto on a, Pa. / WNHC-AM • FM • TV, New Haven-Hartford, Conn. 
National Sales Office, 485 Lexington Avenue, New York 17, New York 

FSPFflfll I Y IN HARTFORD 



Most tignificant n end rmlm 

of tin- week uith interpretation 

in dr\>i)i fur hui>, readers 




SPONSOR-SCOPE 



26 January Once again, statistic* dominate tin- radlo-ti market place. I i-i week cov< 

sponsor publications inc. *"*■ "" buyers' -"ill -<lt<i -' minds (see 5PONSOR-SCOP1 19 January, page 9). Ili.it -ul>- 

ject continues In t<i|> place this week bul with something new added] rates and dis- 
count*. Here is ho* the baD is winding itself up: 

Interpretations of NCS ~'2 are now so muddled thai ii seems -nine -<>it of "arbitration" 
will be sought; the current do-it-yourself movement is rapidl) getting out of hand. So S H \"-> 
Reaearcli Committee hopes to meet soon with the Four V - Broadcast Media Com- 
mittee to develop standards Tor using NCS —2. (McCann-Erickson, incidentally, hai 
to it l>\ contributing inventions of their own.) advised it- time buyers to ride along with the 
confusion as Bensibh, as possible, and not add 

Now note how this rolls over into the rate situation: 

\ number of radio stations have asked their reps about hiking prices. The 
reps, though, arc hesitant to send up a cheer until the) are sure the coverage front is 
quirt enough to risk such a move. 

\n<l this, in turn, rolls into a third matter: 

On the chance that rate hikes eventuall) will become a trend, the reps are warning 
radio stations to be cautious about rate protection. "Don't make it longer than six 
months." the reps sa] (the customary protection now is a year). In fact, Blair openhj ad- 
vocates s six-month procedure, and 11 of its top client- already arc following it. 
SPONSOR will elaborate on the status of coverage in its 2 February issue.) 

How can you create a "fashion" among agencies to buy nighttime radio? 

A number of reps arc thinking about a fund for a study thai would determine < 1 ' 
the quality of the nighttime radio audience (2) its listening habits, and (3) audience buy- 
ing power. 

Say what you will about the shows this season. l\ viewing at night continues 
to prow: 

Nielsen reports that between 8 and 10 p.m., the percentage of homes using tv last 
December was 66.2, compared to 65.1 the year before. 

Converting those percentages to home sets tuned in per commercial minute, you get 
these figures: 

December 1955 December 1956 <~ r Increase 

22,724,000 home sets 26,061,000 home sets 14.7 

('These calculations are based on the following national set totals: December 195.5 — 
14,400,000; December 1956—38,390,000.) 

How much of the tv spot picture do you have cost-wise if you look at bUIingS 
alone? 

TvB says that it would be difficult to arrive at a formula to cover program costs, too. 
But what makes the question particularly pertinent is the fact that in the recent big deal* 
for feature film sponsorship program charsres have run from 50 to 75% of the billing 

Three cases in point : 

• Colgate-KTTY contract: 1200,000 for time: $780,000 for film*. 

• Bristol-Myers-Triande Stations deal: 60% program charge: 10% for time. 

• L&M-KTLA deal: 65% for film-: 35?? for time. 



BPONSOR • 26 JANUARY 1957 






SPONSOR-SCOPE continued . . . 

J ^^ . 

It's a great day for the researchers. This week their dream came true when Hugh 
Beville, NBC director of research, was assigned to the strategy board that will re- 
vamp the programing structure. 

Like editors before them, radio-tv programing folk haven't warmed up to the facts- 
and-figures fellows (a classic in the magazine business is Ben Hibb's Saturday Evening 
Post dictum! "You can't edit by arithmetics"). 

But this year's tv casualties brought the opportunity for a break-through. One 
of Beville's associates says: 

"Program people are setting the stage for more failures unless they research their ideas 
before they are executed." And an agency director comments: "Gambling on a show 
without proper research is too expensive a luxury when you have to spend $4 to $5 million 
for a half-hour show. We don't want post mortems — we want to avoid mistakes before 
they are made." 

The addition of still more westerns to network tv schedules has become a 
subject of spoofing along Madison Avenue. Sample: 

"Looks like the networks are going from the sad season to the saddle season." 
Here's what the networks have in store for the future: 

• ABC TV: Another hour from Warner Bros, (in addition to Cheyenne) and a still un- 
titled half hour show. 

• CBS TV: Two half-hour shows, one of them titled Have Gun, Will Travel. 

• NBC TV: Two shows, one of them from its subsidiary, California National. 

Two events this week highlight the mounting resurgence and interest in net- 
work radio: 

1) Lou Housman, ranked as one of the medium's most brilliant promoters, is return- 
ing to CBS Radio as v.p. in charge of advertising and promotion (he's been on general CBS 
corporate assignments). 

The heads of two recently separated departments will report to him: Lou Dorfsman. 
of sales promotion, and Charles Steinberg, of audience promotion (which includes press 
information and station promotion). 

2) In his round of presentations to New York's top 20 agencies, which started this 
week, Joe Culligan, NBC v.p. in charge of radio, has been getting hefty turnouts of both 
department heads and top management people. He'll make a tour of Chicago agencies 
the second week in February. 

NBC Radio picked up $l-million worth of new business and renewals this 
week: 

North American Phillips (LaRoche), Calgon, Inc. (Ketcham, McL&G), Allis-Chalmers 
(Gittins), Knapp-Monarch (Block Associates), and Maytag (Burnett) are new. Renewals in- 
clude Amoco (Katz), Sunoco (R&R), and Norwich Pharmacal (B&B). 

Is alternate sponsorship leading the big advertiser, with an important stake in 
corporate identity, down the wrong merchandising road? 

Top level thinkers in an agency billing over $60 million in tv are giving this question 
serious analysis this week. 

In fact, they're combing out the whole tv setup with a view to recommending a re- 
vised policy of responsibility for media planning. 

The scope of the inquiry, insofar as it concerns tv, covers these areas: 

• Does an advertiser with a high-priced and quality product — say a $3,500 car — 
obscure, if not surrender his prestige, when his show carries a hitchhike for a product 
like a cleanser? 

• Is it more expedient for a quality client to hold off going into network tv until he can 
control a show tailored to his specific merchandising needs? 

The philosophy implied in this line of musing obviously runs counter to today's pre- 
vailing school. It takes the approach that with the scarcity of prime viewing time being 
what it is. vou can't afford to be too choosey. 

10 SPONSOR • 26 JANUARY 1957 






^ i 



SPONSOR-SCOPE eontmmtd 



Vn Interesting statistical kej t<> the strides tli.it American advertising has 
taken use past 20 yean la a comparison of broadcast billings among agencies. 

Here's how the top 20 ah agencies looked in 1936, compared with the leaden in l! 

1936 1«).">0 

il> BUckett-Sample-Hummert $6,300,000 .1. Voting & Rubicam 

(2) Lord & Thomas (FC&B) 5,600,000 (2) BBDO 000,000 

(3) J.Walter rhompson 5,200,000 (3) McCann-Erickson 76,400,000 

(4) N.W.Ayei 100,000 (4) I. Waltei rhompson 000,000 

(5) l»m><> 2,700,000 red Bates 55,000,000 

(6) Benton & Bowles 00,000 (6) Benton & Bowles ,000 

(7) Young & Rubicam 00,000 (7) Leo Burnett 13,1 ,000 

(8) Blackmail (Compton) iMtxi.ooo (8) Estj 38,000,000 

(9) Stack-Goble 1,600,000 (9) Dancer-F-S 36,000,000 

(10) Erwin, Wasej & Co. 1,500,000 (10) Kenyon & Eckhardl 35,600,000 

(11) F. Wallis Armstrong 1,300,000 'Hi N. W. lyei 000,000 

(12) Ruthrauff & Ryan 1,200,000 (12) FC&B 00,000 

(13) Wade Advertising Co. 1,200,000 (13) Compton 31,600,000 

(14) Newell-Emmetl (Geyer) 1,200,000 (14) SSCB 24,500,000 

(15) Roche, Williams & < 1,100,000 (15) Lennen & Newell 21,000,000 

(16) Estj 1,100,000 (16) Campbell-Ewald L6, ,000 

i 17' Campbell-Ewald 850,000 (17) Cunningham & Walsh 16,000,000 

(18) Lennen & Mitchell 800,000 (18) Ruthrauff & Ryan 15,000,000 

(19) Hutchins 750,000 (19) Biow 15,000,000 

(20) McCann-Erickson _ 700,000 (20) Maxon 14,400,000 



The ups and downs of spot tv bookings between the reps" New York and Chi- 
cago offices now have taken «>n ;i definite rhythm. 

When business was tough f< »r the New York offices in the final quarter of 1956, things 

were booming for tv in Chicago. 

Now that the rr\>- in New York, are having one of their best Januaries in years, t\ 
bookings have taken BOme slump in the Chicago offices. 

Note how these ups and downs are often tied to the actions of a single big ad- 
vertiser who sets the emotional as well as financial pace: P&G has heen a might) 
morale booster in New York: Ralston's spot cancellations to buj into network (Bij 5l 
has depressed Chicago; and Raleigh's how-out to buy network news doesn't cheer anybody 
in the tv spot line. 



Of the three automotive giants. General Motors is spending — by far 
most for the audience it gets in network tv. 

Cost-per-thousand-homes-per-commercial-minute for the trio comes out this waj : 

• General Motors 14.85. 

• Chrysler— $2.70. 

• Ford— 12.50. 



— th» 



For the first time a Nielsen rating report (December) -bows ABC T\ running 

ahead of NBC TV in the number of night-time "firsts'* Sunda) through Saturday. 

"'Firsts" are the top raters when all three networks face one another with spoils 
programs between 7:30 and 11 p.m. 

The box score, according to the December Nielsen i»: ABC. 10; I BS, 23; NBC, 9. 

Recommended to sponsors for information updating and mental stimulation: the one- 
day tv-radio workshop the ANA is staging at the I'laza Hotel. N. Y.. on 1 i Feb. 

The "professors" will include Sherwood Dodge. Terrv dyne, Bob Foreman, Linnea Nel- 
son, and Sam Thurm. George Abrams, Bevlon ad manager, will be chairman. • For complete 
agenda, see Wrap-up, page 58. i 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 



11 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Now that MGM has joined the ranks, all the major Hollywood studios are in the 
business of producing films for tv except Paramount. 

MGM's new producing operation will be under the same division (MGM-TV) which 
has been handling the feature film library. To date contracts on these features represent 
a gross income of $31 million, MGM told stockholders this week. 



If the president of one of the top agencies is suddenly nudged into the chair- 
manship — even though he's got a few years to retirement — it will be because the require- 
ments of agency leadership are undergoing a marked change. 

No longer can the head of an agency sit back like a bank president in an oldtime 
movie. 

The job now calls for creative, imaginative, and professional leadership that's 
thoroughly conversant with the latest marketing and media revolutions. 

(Reference to this problem was made in SPONSOR'S "Agencies in Transition Series," 
12 December 1955 through 20 February 1956.) 



A. C. Nielsen has a ticklish job ahead in revamping his network rating service. 

A meeting he had with network research executives disclosed: 

• Each network had divergent interests when it came to specifying the services 
wanted. 

• Each network specializes in a different kind of sell, so each wants more data to 
bolster its own sales strategy. 

Before the cost matter can be considered, Nielsen will have to come up with a com- 
promise that will be acceptable. 

(See 15 December SPONSOR-SCOPE for Nielsen's proposed NRI changes.) 

Technologies change — sometimes by a happy mistake the sponsor falls in love 
with. 

A camera went out of whack on a broadcast recently and the client cheered the next 
day that "That hazy effect certainly gave that flashback scene a sense of fantasy." 

Phil Spitalny created a similar "improvement" 20 years ago while auditioning 
for General Electric in Indianapolis. 

The setup in the local station made it necessary for Spitalny to spread his band over 
two studios. During the audition, the main mike in the smaller studio blew, and somebody 
quickly opened the connecting door. The result was a pronounced echo. 

When it was all over, one of the GE officials commented: "That hymnal number was 
perfect. It sounded as though that choir was coming right out of the skies." 



It's been a week of extreme contrasts on the media-warring front. 

In Chicago, speakers at the convention of the Newspaper Advertising Executives Associa- 
tion lambasted that ol' debbil, television, and assured the assembled space salesmen that: 
(1) the honeymoon between the viewer and his tv set was over. (2) the sales impact of the 
newest medium was also beginning to thin out. 

In New York — during all this hubbub — ABC TV released an elaborate presentation 
which with facts and figures demonstrated just the contrary. 

The project — given the coined name Motimation — traces the growing impact of tv as a 
force for product exposure and sales, particularly at the super market. Plus tv's continuing 
rise in dollar use among advertisers. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 5; New 
and Renew, page 51; Spot Buys, page 55; News and Idea Wrap-up, page 58; Washington 
Week, page 69; sponsor Hears, page 72; and Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 78. 

12 SPONSOR • 26 JANUARY 1957 







"This is old stuff Cathy. The new Trendex 
has WDGY in first place!" 



The ni'w Trendex 1 jusl ou1 shows WDGY firsl in audience: Morning 
27 ")' i afternoon (27.7$ ... and all-day (27.6$ ! Hooper, Pulse, 
Nielsen . . . and a h<>>t of Twin Cities advertisers agree thai WDGY has 
the big audience for those big results. 

There's a new listen in the Twin Cities and Storz Station programming 
is responsible. Make sure you buy Minneapolis-St. I'jiuI with the new 
data . . . which your nearest Blair man, or General Manager Steve 
Labunski will cheerfully supply. 

. Uonday-Saturda; 






Today's Radio 



WDGY 

Minneapolis-St. Paul 



WHB 
Kansas City 



Represented by John Blair & Co 



WDGY 

perfect-circle daytime signal 

MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL 



TODD STORZ, 

President 








KOWH 

Omaha 



WTIX 

New Orleans 



Represented by Adam Young Inc. 



SPONSOR • 26 .1 vm VKY l ( ).i, 



1 \ 



. 



iktwf 




970 KC 
TULSA, OKL^ 

TULSA'S ONLY^ 

24-HOUR 
MUSIC & NEWS 

STATION 

TULSA'S No. 1 STATION 
TULSA S No. 1 BUY 




KAKC No. 1 

COVERING THE 

OIL CAPITAL OF 

THE WORLD! 

HOOPER-RATING 

OCT. 1956 

TIME STATIONS 

KAKC * B c D E 

25.5 
35.7 
45.1 
30.8 
40.8 



MONDAY-FRIDAY 

12 Noon-6 PM 

MONDAY-FRIDAY 

7 AM-12 Noon 

SUNDAY 
10 AM-6 PM 
SATURDAY 
10 AM-6 PM 
SUN.-SAT. 
6 PM-11 PM 

"MEASUREMENT ADJUSTED TO COMPENSATE FOR 
5:45 P. M. SIGN-OFF OF STATION A. 



12.3' 6.5 19.9 15.8 17.2 

13.8* 4.8 14.5 17.4 13.1 

12.8* 3.6 12.7 11.0 13.3 

10.4* 14.4 11.6 8.6 23.7 

5.3 19.5 15.0 16.5 



BULLETIN! 



PULSE CONFIRMS. IT!!! 

Pulse Inc. also proves the new 

KAKC is No. 1 in Tulsa 



JOHN H. PACE, Exec. V.P. & Gen. Mgr. 

AMERICAN AIRLINES BLDG.-Tulsa, Okla. 

Telephone LU 7-2401 

Representatives: 

NATIONAL: Richard O'Connell, Inc. 
SOUTH: Clarke Brown Co. 
WEST COAST: Tracy Moore 



Timebuyers 
at work 



14 




Howard Webb, Robert Allum Co.. New York, comments about 
media testing: "When you select two areas — one, for example, for 
the use of tv, the other for the use of advertising other than tv — 
they should be as nearly identical as possible. You do not have a 
valid test unless sales are equal and there is a close similarity in 
factors which affect sales, such as 
population and social, economic, 
geographic and weather patterns. 
The very nature of testing is so 
precarious that the slightest differ- 
ence in any of these might provide 
a false base for evaluation. For a 
comprehensive picture, be sure to 
choose two different types of test 
areas — one, large cities, the other 
small towns." Howard says the 
cities should : I 1 I be highly indi- 
vidual, and not dominated or in- 
fluenced in any way by a nearby larger city: (2l be continually 
growing in population and attracting new industr) : I 3 I have diver- 
sified sources of income: i4) have many outlets for the advertiser's 
product: too often sales concentrated in a few major stores distort 
the tests balance. '"In addition, the areas must be studied carefullv 
during the tests to make sure none of these factors change." 



Beryl Seidenberg, Kastor. Farrell. Chesley & Clifford. New York, 
points out that timebuying becomes highly complex when the prod- 
uct being advertised sells to a specialized market. "For example. 
when we bought spots to reach the 40-up age group, we had to study 
their interests and behavior patterns as well as ratings to determine 

the best schedules and program- 
ing." Beryl sa\s. "The study 
showed that a large segment of 
older people were attracted to 
movies on television because of 
strong nostalgia and identification 
with personalities their own age. 
News shows had a large listening 
audience among them because 
many were retired and their in- 
creased leisure gave them an ap- 
petite for outside mental stimula- 
tion for which they had neither 
the time nor the energy before." Bervl found that they watched tv 
largely in the breakfast and early evening hours, since they rose and 
retired early. In addition, like other age groups, their viewing in- 
creased considerably at the end of the week, when they had more 
leisure. "Every factor must be considered." Beryl concludes, "be- 
cause both the tangibles and intangibles are often important." 




SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 



PIN POINT POWER 
GETS BEST RESULTS 



Radio Station W-l-T-H "pin point power" is tailor-made to 
blanket Baltimore's 1 5-mile radius at low, low rates — 
with no waste coverage. W-l-T-H reaches 7 4% °f a " 
Baltimore homes every week — delivers more listeners per 
dollar than any competitor. That's why we have twice as 
many advertisers as any competitor. That's why we're sure 
to provide a "steady stream' 1 of sales results for you, too. 

^Cumulative Pulse Audience Survey 




Tom Tinsley 

President 

R. C. Embry 
Vice Pres. 



c o 



FIDE 



C E 



National Representatives: Select Station Representatives in New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington. 
Forjoe & Co. in Chicago, Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Dallas, Atlanta. 



sponsor • 2(> JANUARY 1957 



15 



ee 



,THE VERY 
TELEVISION 

SCREEN 
SEEMED TO 

EXPAND . . ." 



The NBC Opera's production (of 
"War and Peace" ) was so impressive that 
the very television screen seemed to 
expand. For those who could see 
the telecast in color, the atmosphere of 
most of the sets . . . was strikingly 
conveyed. . . . There was not a poor 
performer in the lot. This country has 
cause to be proud that it could 
supply such a company. 

HOWARD TAUBMAN, NEW YORK TIMES 

Put down "War and Peace" as one of the 
memorable events of television. 

BEN CROSS, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS 

. . . makes musical history. 

HARRIETT JOHNSON, NEW YORK POST 

A major musical event ... a notable 
achievement. 

TIME, JANUARY 21, 1957 

In 20 years, NBC's Robert Sarnoff 
recently predicted, Americans will spend 
more on opera than on baseball. 
If so, credit the NBC Opera Theatre with 
starting the trend. 

HARRIET VAN HORNE, 

NEW YORK WORLD-TELECRAM & SUN 

This was an event transcending 
TV itself in cultural importance and 
artistic progress. 

JACK GOULD, NEW YORK TIMES 

It is not only for its willingness to 
undertake the unusual that I salute the 
NBC Opera Theatre. There's no 
stuffiness about them . . . 
NBC Opera Theatre, I love you! 

JAY NELSON TUCK, NEW YORK POST 

In presenting "War and Peace". . . 
the NBC Opera Theatre reached a new 
peak. An admirable production 
in every respect . . . 

DONALD KIRKLEY, BALTIMORE SUN 

... a performance of epic proportions. 
NEWSWEEK 

NBC did itself proud yesterday . . . 
a significant "first" for television. 

ERNEST L. SCHIER, 
PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS 

...» vastly commendable piece of 
work in every way, and a credit to its 
performers, to NBC, and to the 
television industry today. 

PAUL HUME, WASHINGTON POST 

. . . The Met would have to give 
the work every performance of its season 
for more than thirty-fire years to 
reach the vast audience your splendid 
production played to . . . Your vision 
and accomplishment are a truly bright 
light in our time. 

S. HUROK, NEW YORK 

. . . Enthralled by the beauty and 
magnificence of your production . . . 
Please accept my loudest bravos . . . 

KING VIDOR, BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORNIA 













. 



NCE AGAIN NBC has 
made television history— this time 
with the NBC Opera Company's 
widely acclaimed colorcast of 
"War and Trace." 
This type of programming— the 
big, special "out-of-schedule" show- 
has had an extraordinai) impact 
on the nation's viewing habits 
over the past three years. Vnd this 
season Nielsen Ends that these 
NBC Spectaculars and special 
shows are reaching 

27y c i more homes per average 
minute than h»-l sen-ou 

f more homes per average 
minute than the average 
of all evening programs 
on all TV networks. 
This venturesome, talk-provoking 
nt" progr ammin g is just one 
more reason why 

daytime or evening, tvt ~Q O 
more people vie^ the 1^1 iL5\>« 

TELEVISION 

NETWORK 

than any other network* 

•NIELSEN COVERAGE SERVICE. STUDY "2 
(SPRING 1956) WEEKLY VIEWING OATA 




by Joe Csida 




1. C«ar«r •» Norion'i 
tup*r+*nU Aircraft 
pr*4n«ti*ft. 

twill Iiponiioni 
America's fotrttf 
ff*wi«f f r«n»i«r. 



! 000 WATTS 
I380KC 




Sponsor 




Feature film and network plans 

It must have been at least three months before 
Matty Fox announced recently that he was re- 
leasing more than 80 post-1948 RKO feature 
films to tv. that this corner pointed out the im- 
minence of such a move. And much more of 
this post-'48 product will hit the video mart 
before too long regardless of how quicklv the 
Republic Pictures suit against James Petrillo 
and the American Federation of Musicians comes to trial 




If Re- 



18 



i 



public is successful in eliminating the big land that ry't is plenty 
big I bite the Music Trust Fund takes on a post-1948 film's gross tv 
earnings, naturally the flow of such product to the market will be 
somewhat accelerated. 

But deals will be worked out. and substantial newer product will 
be seen on telescreens before the New Year is out. With the heftv 
ratings racked up in many major markets by some of the better 
pre-1948 product, quite a few observers are predicting severe de- 
clines in the amount and quality of live programing and in half 
hour film shows specifically produced for tv. I still believe that 
prognostications along such lines will prove incorrect. 

Agencies and advertisers who scan the broader broadcast picture 
will have noted a number of indications that live and tv film shows 
will boom in spite of the excellent feature film product now avail- 
able and to be made available. 

Network prestige is at stake 

While they have not said so publicly. ABC and CBS are as aware 
as NBC that it would be a serious blow to every network's prestige, 
and to every network's very place in the overall television picture, if 
too many feature film shows replaced too many live shows on too 
many key stations. Bobby Sarnoff spoke bluntly at the recent NBC 
affiliates' convention about this danger, and you may be sure that 
NBC will not stop at Bobby's words of warning. Thev will take the 
much more practical and effective step of combatting the feature 
film onslaught with the best new live shows the web can produce or 
purchase. And so will CBS and ABC. The latter network's very 
expensive deal with Frank Sinatra, for example, was dictated at least 
in part by the fundamental need to combat feature film inroads, 
although it was primarily dictated by Leonard Goldenson's desire 
to step up his competitive battle with CBS and NBC. 

Before too many more weeks pass you will see other rather spec- 
tacular talent and show announcements made by all three webs. 
And the tv film people have hardly hastened underground in the 
face of the boom in feature film business. Quite to the contrary, 
such leading producers of telefilm made specifically for the medium 
as Screen Gems and Television Programs of America (to name just 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 



Louisville's 
BEST KNOWN FIGURE 




The WHAS-TV Channel 11 figure draws the cap pistol crew 
to their TV sets at 4:00 pm daily for "T-BAR-V". At other times, 
he ages a bit to call adults and children alike to another 
outstanding WHAS-TV production, "Midday Roundup" for 
the latest news, weather, market reports and country music. 

However he's cast, on ID and promoton slides, the Channel 11 
figure constantly reminds viewers where they can find the 
best in entertainment and information. 

He should remind you that for selling results, individual 
and distinctive treatment, your advertising deserves the impact 
of programming of character. In Louisville, WHAS-TV 
programming PAYS OFF! 

Are you participating? 



VICTOR A. SHOLIS. Director 

NEIL CLINE, Station Mgr. 
Represented Nationally by Harrington, Righter 4 Parsons 
Associated with The Courier-Journal and Louisville Times 




•ASIC CIS-TV Network 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 



19* 






Dominant Negro 
Coverage in the 

2 Top Markets 

^ ALABAMA 




I ^ in Negro Audience 

* (Hooper, Oct. -Nov. 1955) 

Also 1 st in Negro Audience in General 
Hooper, Nov., 1956) 

3 RD in total audience 

" (Hooper, Nov. 1956) 




in total audience 



(Hooper Feb. 19561 
(Pulse June 1956) 



Your best ALABAMA buys 




For combination rates, 
see John E. Pearson 

WEDR-WMOZ 

EDWIN H. ESTES 
Owner 






20 




Sponsor backstage continued 



two) have announced costly and ambitious immediate plans. 

TPA has budgeted close to SI 1.000.000 for the production of 
eight new series during the first half of 1957 alone. These include 
a half hour detective show called The Adventures of Charlie Chan; 
two half hour series featuring well-known Saturday Evening Post 
characters (one is Tugboat Annie and the other Hap\yy Digby, the 
newspaper photographer) ; another half hour show tagged New York 
Confidential, and still another called Waldo. In addition to the new 
shows TPA is also producing another 26 episodes in the Suzy or 
Private Secretary series. 

Screen Gems is producing and/or planning production on nine 
new series for airing this fall, and possibly another nine for a 
future date. Pilot films on all eighteen of these shows are now 
either in production, or are in the planning stage. These shows in- 
clude a new bible series called The Book of Books; a country music 
show entitled Western Ranch Parly; a Navy show, Shore Leave; 
and a Marine adventure series called The Leathernecks. 

These pilots represent an investment of close to a million dollars, 
and Screen Gems and TPA and many another tv film factory is thus 
making it pretty plain that they do not expect the feature film 
handlers to take over entirely. 

All of which, of course, really indicates that for the coming Fall 
the national, regional and local advertiser should have a greater 
choice of better programing than ever before in the short life of tv. 

Network radio is being rediscovered 

And talking about better programing and better advertising buys, 
which obviously are synonymous — this is as good a spot as any to 
remind one and all that network radio is being rediscovered. And 
for the very good reason that agencies and advertisers have found 
it to be a remarkably fine sales medium. Bristol-Myers and Brown 
& Williamson are not laying more than S2 million each on the line 
to sponsor the new NBC Radio hourly newscasts because they are 
fond of General or Robert Sarnoff. Nor did Lever Brothers set up a 
$3 million budget for CBS radio purchases recently for sentimental 
reasons. 

Radio's quiet but steady resurgence in the past year is not only a 
heartwarming spectacle to those of us who watched its grim struggle 
for the past five or six years, but it has important practical connota- 
tions to advertisers on every level. 

It has been rather clearly established, thanks to the efforts of 
CBS's John Karol, NBC's Joe Culligan and many others, that net- 
work radio (and radio generallv i appeals much more to many 
persons than daytime television. It has also been established that 
a rather substantial number of people prefer radio to tv — period. 
This is obviously not to minimize television's glaringly obvious 
strides, and its tremendous effectiveness. It is merely to restate 
radio's great capacities as a sales medium. Many advertisers are 
finding it is extremely wise to complement tv campaigns with radio, 
network, regional and/or local. And this trend will surely continue 
through 1957. ^ 



SPONSOR 



26 January 1957 



THE TV 

20THCEHTURYJ 



as propelled by 2Qth CENTURY-FOX 




i 



:f 









£*- 



* 




CENTU 









Twentieth Century-Fox has produced some of the most outstanding entertain- 
ment of our time. Entertainment that represents the positive peak in quality, as 
created by some of the most notable stars, writers and directors of this generation. 







a few of the guided missiles... to stratospheric 





LAURA 

lifton Webb, Dana Andrews, ~\ 
Gene Tierney 



of feature film masterpieces... produced b 




to all TV stations and all TV sponsors... fron 




yfr k 

THE MOON IS DOWN 
JLee J. Cobb, Cedric Hardwicke 




IN OLD CHICAGO 

>on Ameche, Alice Faye, Tyrone Powei 



ratings... from the "ROCKET 86" group... 





Oth CENTURY-FOX... and available now .. 




[NATIONAL TELEFILM ASSOCIATES 




, 



...and 8 other 
outstanding successes 
from major producers! 




d NATIONAL TELEFILM ASSOCIATES, INC 



YOU, TOO, CAN CONQUER 



AND SPACE 



. L .with astronomical ratings ! 




You'll own the time that these outstanding 21 
Century-Fox successes appear on TV, insofar i 
your competition is concerned. Feature films of 
calibre have commonly caused station ratings 
skyrocket from 600% to 700%. 

SPACE: You'll own that precious 21-inch space on yoi 
viewers' TV screens, leading stations and sponso 
to the greatest sales opportunities they've ev. 
known. 

So mount these assured blockbusters ... while there 
still time and space to accommodate you. 
Climb aboard the TV Rocket ol the 20th Century... no 






Reps at work 




Frnnk Elliot Jr., CBS Television Spol Sales, New V>ik. comments: 
"Tim maft) people in tlii- business -it back and lei the advertise] 
ami hi- agency grope through ratings and research data i" ascertain 
ilic value and effectiveness "I the television time they're buying. In 
what other industry could you gel away with that? It's the re- 
sponsibility of the medium to 
show them that they're getting 
their money's worth. That's why 
i BS has created a 'Spol < .heck 
Plan 1 which provides important 
qualitative and quantitative in- 
formation a I no cost I hrough 
Tele-Pulse, 500 people are in- 
terviewed before and after an ad- 
vertiser's 13-week t\ spol cam- 
paign. The) arc asked 'what arc 
all the brands ol a given product 
thai j "it know '. . what brand <li<l 
\ou la-i buy? and where did you last see or hear this product 
recently? 1 From this, the product's share-of-the-markel percentage 
i- determined and when the advertiser correlates ii with store 
sales, before and after the campaign, the exact imparl oi the i\ spol 
i- known. The) are additionally aide in test media, days and times, 
and copy. This plan is attracting new and old advertisers alike. 



Saul Rosensweig, The Katz Vgency, New "i ork, comments: " Vdver- 
tisers and agencies should re-evaluate their buys on 'spot carriers. 
These buys on network programs, where Inner- can secure a spol 
for one performance or as main as the) want, are of questionable 
value. The 'spot carrier" i- a hybrid form, a compromise between 

network and true spot, with none 
of the advantages of spol and all 
the disadvantages ol network. We 
11 hide a stud) of the two types here 
at Kat/. and the superiority of 
spot was demonstrated in its abil- 
ity to meet e\er\ important stand- 
ard for air advertising, in contrast 
^^L ^^k to the '-pot carrier". ITie-e -land- 

^k^^^^^^. ards. Saul -a\-. choice of co\ - 

^L ^ i erase, market-to-market flexibility 

m . V \ °l schedules and time -lot- and 

station selectivity. In addition. 
he sa\s. spot features a lower cost-per-1,000; spot advertisers have 
the advantage of personalized and localized handling ol merchandis- 
ing problems: and the\ have a free choice of commercial presenta- 
tion techniques, with either local or national name personalities 
giving endorsement to their product- it they de-ire. \ll these point- 
will he discussed more fully in a new Katz spot tv presentation. 




Things are hatching 

£^ in the 

%Dj WREN's 




SPONSOR 



26 January 195*3 



. . . or taxes 

They Both Pour 
Money Into TOPEKA 

.i in u look .it the Topeka 
markel and you 11 like what you find. 
Construction's ai an all time high 
. . . like the nt 000 state 

office building ju-t completed, oi th< 
110,000,000 expansion of Goodyear's 
alread) huge plant! Bustling busy 
ropeka has gained heavily in pnpul.i 
lion . - 126,000 now in r 
politan Vrea It's B4th best in con 
sumei spendable income, too! \n<l 
in the new Nielsen circulation 
me-, uci this: WREN 
pel < i in "' home - ■ 

single <1a\ I opeka i* uor I H 
M \\ l\(. . .mrl \\ Kl \ is the 



REP. BY JOHN E. PEARSON 




5C00 WATTS 
TOPEKA, KANSAS 



21 



Pat delivers 
in person . . . 



Not by mail. Pat Lattanzi never mails answers 
to questions. He takes them around himself— 
right aivay. Availabilities; market informa- 
tion; local tie-in ideas— never by mail, always 
in person. Why? Simply because Pat really 
wants to be of help. He's bought time himself 
and he knows how important good service can 
be. Plus ideas. Ideas supported by all the infor- 
mation regarding Burke-Stuart station rates 
and coverage; information that is absolutely 
accurate with never a misleading or exag- 
gerated claim. No wonder Pat Lattanzi is a 
candid camera fan. His hobby is making true- 
to-life pictures, pictures that clearly reflect 
human interest. Maybe that's one of the reasons 
why Pat is never at a loss for ideas— thoughts 
that are honest, human, and helpful. Why not 
put your questions to Pat? You can be sure 
he'll try his best for the answers that will help. 
Our phone is PL 1-4646. If Pat is away from 
his desk at the moment, ask for our President, 
Ted Oberfelder. He'll be glad to pinch-hit. 

BURKE-STUART CO ., INC. 

Radio- and " r JeteaiA.i&n Station R.epAedentatioei 
60 East 56 Street, New York 22, New York 
Chicago • Detroit • Los Angeles ■ San Francisco 

Representing, among others: WCFL, Chicago, Illinois, WAKR & 
WAKR-TV, Akron, Ohio, WIVY, Jacksonville, Florida. WINS. N.Y. 



22 



49th am 
Madison 



All-media evaluation study 
I just finished reading your All-Media 
Evaluation Study. I thought it was the 
most thought provoking and helpful 
picture of actual conditions in the me- 
dia field that I have seen. My com- 
pliments on this joh have been delayed 
only by the time it has taken me to 
learn of your study. 

As a space salesman, I was both 
pleased and disturbed that your study 
found as much confusion and lack of 
agreement as I have found in calling 
on agencies and advertisers across 
seven states, over several years. 

During this time, I have been con- 
ducting an informal survey. My pur- 
pose has been to develop answers to 
the question of advertising frequency. 

Result: I found that little was known 
about frequency. 

A reproduction of your memo to all 
the members of the advisory board ap- 
pears on page 140 of your study. "Im- 
portance of frequency in advertising" 
is the number one subject you sug- 
gested for additional comment. Have 
you developed or printed anything fur- 
ther on frequencv since vour study? 
William A. Rose 
The Wall Street Journal 

• SPONSOR has published several articles which 
touch upon the suhject of advertising frequency, 
although not specifically dealing with it. . . . Tin. 
subject deserves special attention and shall bo 
covered in a future SPONSOR article. 

More case histories requested 
Could it be that I could be of some 
help to vou? I definitely do not know 
your business, but perhaps an ob- 
servation from my point of view 
would be of some value. After ten 
a ears in the business. I consider my- 
self a somewhat typical sponsor sub- 
scriber insofar as small stations are 
concerned. 

I finnlv believe that damned near 
every person in radio who subscribes 
to your mag does so for one main 
reason. That reason is easily summed 
up in two words . . . SUCCESS 
STORIES. I don't know what propor- 
tion of vour subscriptions are sent to 
people in small stations, but it doesn't 
matter. We don't ask that you gear 
vour whole operation to us, just that 



SPONSOR • 26 JANUARY 1957 



you 



remembei wh) we're ta 



Most ,,i ii- are starved to. ideas 
ideas we can steal and use. Su< 
cees stories are the answer. W e don t 
care where thej come from; well 
adapt ill. in to "in own problems. 

Nil Sanders, operation* tnanai ei 
KFOX, Hollywood 



• Mtfaauaa mw *"l" jr - ■ '' 

,. ,i,,,. ( ill. leW l> r.»uii.l->.|. "I 

nil. appeared i» .1" •"• laawarj 



,1. Nl'ON-Oll 
I .,..1 r.ill.. 
..I ^'> l> 



1,,-r U.u.O -. Bad it neaeeaarj la »P»J ' 

broader edlteria Il«y. Bal r. .adex Sudan saa 

l„ .„r, il.rr.- -ill be .... blateriee -ill. aaaWa 
,„ ,. % . r , banc "i SPOIWOa. 

Farm broadcasting 

I wanl i" take this opportunit) to 

express mj personal apprecial as 

well as that of the National \-'» iation 
f Television and Radio Farm Direi 
in,, for the stor) which appeared in 
the Januarj 5 issue of your magazine 
in ilw T\ and Radio Newsmakers. 
You have always exhibited a most 
generous attitude toward the Farm 
Broadcasting Profession and for this 
we are deep!) appreciative. \- a 
matter of Fact, we Full) recognize thai 
it would not have been possible l"i 
our Association to gain its present 
l».»iii..n in the industry had il not been 
for folk- like you. 

Jack Timmons, president \ ITRFD 

Kit KH, Shreveport 

• SPONSOR i- |.r..u.l la hare balpad ika 
NVIKIH HBlm nallanal raeagnlUen a« pari >•. 
SPONSOR"! pollcj lo encourage ami promote 
-,.,. i.l broadeaal market* l">.l< through article- 
.ni.l market •ectiona. 

WICU revisited 

On behalf of our friends at WICU, 
Erie, I would I i k.*- t«. bring to your at- 
tention a brod) and two updatings ol 
data on pages 60 and 64 of your 
December 2 ( )th issue, wherein you 
refer i<> their highl) successful "Let- 
ters to Santa" promotion under the 
caption, RADIO STATIONS. 

\- to the error. WIC1 operates as 
Channel 12. and transmits good clear 
pictures along with sound. 

\, Erie's onl) \ HF television sta- 
tion and an affiliate of NBC and »B( 
i! delivers ver) substantial viewing 
audience- 1<> advertisers, who like what 
its sight, sound and action do to their 
sale-. 

Re the two updatings of figures on 
page (>4: 

The "Letters to Santa"" Promotion 
eventuall) brought in letters with 43 
different postmark- as compared to the 
39 you mention, and pulled over i. 1 ' 11 " 
letters which is better than the \^\)-,\- 
da) listed in \our item. 

Boh Hutton, promotion director 
F.Juanl Petty, Veui York 



SPONSOR 



26 jam Am 1951 



Handy Bookmark Series 







"-—an- n "w 

Product in kmds - but if 
6 " en 'n g 1 ' e fences , RE 

'•«*/,,„ .. 0r * Nation" 
■ Minute »,.,. . 



I Los Angel e 



Xe Prcs 



e "led 

'La. 



Teh 



n °lio. 



* Tim 
Vision 



es 



MGM 



Keep your place 
in Los Angeles 
with KTTV 



8<-A 



/«- 



TV 



23 



5 MILE: 

one of a series of paintings 

of Washington by William Walton 

commissioned by WTOP Television 

at Broadcast House, Washington, D. C. 

Operated by The Washington Post Broadcast Division 

Represented by CBS Television Spot Sales 



THE PRESIDENT'S MILE 

by William Walton. 

Ninth of a series of paintings of Washington 

commissioned by WTOP Television 

at Broadcast House, Washington, D. C. 

Operated by The Washington Post Broadcast Division 

Reprints of this series available on request. 



We Have A Discovery, Too, 

Admiral Byrd 




\<lmi...l Richard I . B rd is alleged 
i" have stated, Facetiously, thai he 
knew his discover] was the SOI III 
POLE, because Eskimos greeted him, 
"Glub! Glub You Ml!" Well, we 
have a discovei \ in the South, too! . . 
the disi o\ ei \ cila quarter-billion dol" 
lar Negro market in Memphis! Vrouse 
your sense "t adventure and explore 
potentials thru \\ 1)1 \. top-rated, Ne- 
gro Radio Station, in Memphis! 

Socio-llcoiioiiiif lt<>\ nlui ion 

In the industrial revolution of the 
South, Memphis has become a majoi 
center "I development and Negroes 
have become a vital factor in the pros- 
perity of the community. Umosl one- 
tenth «>f the entire Negro population 
of America resides in Memphis. In- 
ilustr\. now. uses this Negro labor on 

a |250 Million, annual, basis. \\ illi 
a quarter-billion dollar payroll, the 
earning power <>f the Memphis Negroes 
i- the highest, per capita, relative t" 
white, <>f am Negroes in the nation. 

\- Negro econom) ha- expanded, 
social consciousness lias increased, 
rhese colored citizens activel) par- 
ticipate in group-civic, and fraternal 
organizations. The) accept responsi- 
bility for le-s progressive members of 
their race and support welfare work 
for Negroes. \\ Dl \ nurtures most of 
these public relations promotions and 
fosters the racial ambition for com- 
munity recognition. 

W Dl \. also, encourages individual 
desire for social acceptance. In fact, 
W Dl \ lias been instrumental in artic- 
ulating this pent-up longing of the 

Memphis Negroes '"to be as g 1 as 

anyone else" .... and has imple- 
mented the sale ot a fantastic volume 
of goods to -alish their urge for pre- 
mium-grade foods. st\H-h clothing, 
and name-brand cosmetics. Now. at 



Kv IL'iroM \ \ : 1 1 K « - 1 

i i line, h hen Memphis Negi oes are 
earning more than al an) period in 
histoi ) . the) are leai ning through 
\\ I >l \. to a In ■■•■ extent, how to up- 

i i le theii standard ol li» ing. \\ Dl \ 
has sui i eeded in breaking old i us- 
toms and establishing new consumer 
buying habits. Negroes in the Mem- 
phis trade are are spending $250 mil- 
lion dollai - a \ eai on more and bettei 
consumei g Is! 

i * >•«» i if Motive 

I oreseeing this economii t rend, 
\\ Dl \ converte I, in 1948, from the 
i onventional t- |"- radio station, to in 
all-negro program center. Within one 
j eai . \\ I )l \ jumped from lasl to first 
position in over-all audience rating, 
and augmented it- annual gross dollar 
volume b) 600%! If you have a profit 
n otive in mind, take a mental expedi- 
tion to w Di \: 

Krai lion Patten 
\ll buying depends, first, on cover- 
age . . . then reaction to contai t. 
\\ Dl \ has coverage that is uni hal- 
lenged ... it i- the onl) 50,000 watl 

station in Memphis. \ddfd to -ii- 

I erior fai ilities, \\ Dl \ i reates a re- 
action pattern, which ma) be judged 
In the ta< i that W Dl \ has the largesl 
number of national advertisers in this 
radio field. 

Here's why. W Dl \ know- the psy- 
chological make-up of the Southern 
Negroes understands his evolving 
position. Therefore, W Dl \ customizes 
programming to meet the changing 
socio-economic needs, providing Ne- 
gro announcers, disc jockeys, per- 
formers, to establish rapport with 
listeners, through traditional type en- 
tertainment and commercials. 

Negro listeners respond to their own 
kind, as colored disc jockeys differ- 
entiate between "gospel" and "-(>irit- 
ual music . . . alternate rock-and-roll 
with bona fide blues . . . and validate 
the whole with a corresponding li n -■ ■. 
Audiences accept counsel, for stars 
comprehend the elemental philosophy, 
which i- second nature to the Negroes 
and function in an advisor) capacity, 
serving both Negroes and advertisers. 
Most important of all. perhaps, i- ac- 
ceptance ot new-, which Negro broad- 
casters slant to their audiences. I he\ 
include Negro church and social i 
I"he\ present regional and national 
new- in a simplicit) of style, suitable 
for a virtuall) non-reading public The 
al>ilit\ to reach i- \er\ low anions the 



Southern Negroes ili<-\ depend upon 
\\ Dl \ foi theii news, th< ii infoi 
lion, and ih>ii entertainment. W Dl \ 
reci ignizes these requirements . . , but, 
.it the same time displaj - a< uti 
ness of the new Btatus, takes i ogniz 
of the new desire i"i Bupei ioi si 
ards. 

Negro Spending 

i onsequently, Negroes in Memphis 
and surrounding trade area spend 
80' i ol theii in< ome on consumei 

I > i • •< 1 u> t-. sui h as t I-. druj 

line, and -"it goods. Vmong \\ Dl \ - 
nat ional ' lientele are: 

Hint- Plate I ihhIs . . ( 'ttrlt'r's 

Little Liver I'M* . . Ea«e . . 

Xrr'nl Xii.vtrrll House 

( 'effee . . Schiitz Beer. 
rhese and mam othei manufacturers, 
distributors, dealers, realize thai ordi- 
nal") media do not cannot real h 
tin- vasl Negro market. On the other 
hand, sales records convince them of 
the' power ol \\DI\- programming 
-i i u< tin'' and sales-produi live pei - 

-■'Malitie-. 

< Ii.iiHmI \\ ntvrs 

II you are interested in adventure, 
w ith a pi "lit moth e, prepare t" explore 
the Negro market in Memphis dis- 
covered b) \\ Dl \. \\ 1)1 \ sails in 
• halted waters. ^ ou can embark on 
the most profitable territory, available 
in the country. \\ DI \ has, already, 
developed a ro eptive audieni e . . . 
and it- initiative, programming, per- 
formam e, have marked a definite claim 
to this extensive and lucrative market. 

W ith \\ Dl \'- 50,000 watt i ovei i 
ii reaches 1 ,237,686 Negri 
I he \\ Dl \ Negro Staff adds commer- 
cial impai ti" tremendous i enetration. 
Market possibilities are fabulous. In- 
quire about them, immediatel) . 1 1 
ii- a note on youi letterhead, that we 
ma) make a spei ialized stud) of how 
\\ Dl \ ma) best serve the interest of 
your line. \-k. also, t"i a hound 
c »p) of, "I he Stoi ■ of WDIA!" 

\\ Dl \ i- re resented national!) 1>\ 
I I npany. 

J<<H\~Ff.!TER. Preside*! 




■ FERCi 



BERT FERCVSOS, Central Manager 



HAROLD WALKER, Commimal Slanaftr 




1; 



Y W^ 1 



'.». >> • 



\ 



FLORENCE, S. C. 




ONE MILLION WITH 
ONE BILLION 

You can now find the magical Milky Way 
in the Carolinas! Hundreds of thriving 
communities and towns cluster around 
Florence, making the market comparable in 
size to "key city" metropolitan areas. 

The Florence "milky way market" adds 
up to one million people with more than 
one billion effective buying income! 

Only VVB7W can give advertisers 
imduplicoted coverage of the rich "milky 
way market" . . . one million with 
one billion! 

Chart your sales system to include 
the solar of the milky way market . . . 
WBTW, Florence. 

Represented nationally by CBS Television Spot Sales 







Jefkkrson Standard Broadcasting Company 



*£. 



S RO N SOR 

20 JANUARY 1037 




THE Y&R MEDIA STRATEGY 

Three years of using all-media buying setup lia^ 
proved effective to the Number One tv-radio agencj 



I his week the Y&R media depart- 
ment, largest buyer of broadcast me- 
dia, -tart- its fourth year oi operating 
under the all-media buying system. 

This period lias been one of ureal 
growth, with attendant increase in the 
burden and complications <>f the de- 
partment's work. Since L953, the 
agenc) has virtuall) doubled the vol- 
ume of radio-tv billings, going from 
148 million in 1953 to $82 million in 

1956. Y&R's top executives estimate 
that air billings alone ma] exceed Hon 
million this J ear. 

When Y&R hr<t adopted the all- 
media system, the broadcast industry 
watched >\ ith mixed feelings, ("riti- 



By Evelyn Konrad 

<i-m- began pouring in even before the 
system had none into effect There 
were the skeptics at other major agen- 
cies who doubted that a system used 
for reasons of personnel shortages and 
economies in \er\ small agencies could 
be transferred to an agenc) with multi- 
million accounts without loss of client 
servicing. Media reps feared a loss of 
personal contact with buyers who'd 1 <■ 
involved in all. rather than in special- 
ized media. 

Now that the system has been in ef- 
fect for three years, sponsor decided 
to re\ isit 'see "The all-media buyer at 
Y&R,' 1 sponsor, 9 \uuu-t 1954) the 
agenc] and reappraise the method. 



Modifications and i hanges have 
curred since it- birth, but Y&R baa 
continued and expanded it- all-media 
buying operation as original!) con- 
ceived. 

"We've found that our all-media 
buying operation relates direct!) to the 
marketing revolution since the end of 
the war," says Pete Levathes, Y&R \.p. 
and media director. "It mak< - 
-ihle for each buyer to operate in 
depth on his accounts and t" make hi- 

media decisions based upon broad 
knowledge of the client- sales, di-tri- 
bution and marketing needs." 

Since the concept was hr-t intro- 
duced at Y&R, the all-media buying 



SPONSOR 



26 .1 \m \m 1951 



27 



All-media thinking begins at trainee and 

indoctrination level, when department recruits are rotated 

into various media services, then assigned to buyers 



sv stem has undergone several changes 
and improvements have been made as 
problems cropped up. The inevitable 
problem of each buyer maintaining 

(■(intact with station reps for avail- 
abilities, for instance, was solved b) 
the establishment of a "contact clear- 
ing house." the spot coordinating unit. 

Vnother problem in the earl) days 
of the system was that of reorienting 
the thinking of old time space buyers 
and timebuyers to turn them into all- 
media strategists. A continuous train- 
ing program for all levels of its media 
personnel was ^ \l! » solution. 

In order to evaluate its effectiveness. 
sponsor made a special tour through 
Y&R's 191-man media department in 
\cw York. This tour, set up 1>\ Le- 



vathes, comprised in-depth interviews 
with \ &R associate media directors, 
all-media huvers. their assistants and 
members of v arious new sen ice groups 
within the media department who 
channel information to the buyers. 

SPONSOR watched Y&R media huv- 
ers at work, followed through actual 
client problems from the discussion 
stage to the solution. From this inside- 
the-conference-room survev emerge scv - 
eral questions about the functioning 
and effectiveness of the Y&R approach 
to media huv ing : 

• How do the 26 all-media buyers 
in the New York office divide the bulk 
of nearly $200 million in total billings 
I etween them? 



• (Ian one man actually be an ex- 
pert in all media and still carrv 
through on all the contact and detail 
implicit in being an efficient media 
huv er? 

• What service- does a ^ \R client 
gain from this approach to media buv- 
ing? 

• \\ hat's it like to buv media in 
the No. One radio-tv agency in the 
countrv ? 

At the base of the answers to these 
questions is the fundamental philoso- 
phy that explains Y&R s switch to an 
all-media buying operation: 

"We want our buyers to run their 
accounts as if thev were investing their 
own business funds," said Levathes. 
"This attitude accounts for a different 
psychology among our buyers. \t ^1 &R 
media men are counsellors advising 
clients on the most efficient way dol- 
lars should be spent in advertising. 
Thev re not specialists in particular 
media, but rather they work in depth 




Detail work is kept to minim um by service divisions in media department. Mx>ve (r), buyer Warren Bahr coor- 
dinates with Kay Jones (center), Bpot availability head, and Kent Rodenberger Hi ^iKR traffic man for Time. Lac 






SPONSOR 



2(> .1 \M vtn 1957 




Rep contact i« important pan ol buyei - ">'ik. 

I tor) I -. leanne Pyle ol Forjoe, Dan Hydrick 

i.i Wi.ll. Norfolk, discuss availabilities with ; 

Training nevi all-media men it pari ol Y&H 
plan. Here W. Matthews, executive assistant to 
media direi toi r), talks to • Sweenej 




on accounts, with client advertising 
departments and salesmen. 

This point m| \ lew summai izes the 
level i'i service Y&H led- intent upon 
rendering i<> it- clients. I he agency 
wanted more strategists and media 
planners, rather than jusl detail men. 

""Our all-media buyers actually func- 
tion as media directors mi their par- 
ticular accounts," Levathes told SPON- 
SOR. " I*he) make tlir fundamental 
budget recommendation ami suggest 
the media required for ili«' client's 
varying marketing needs. We feel that 
thej could not fulfill this, limit most 
important function, successful]) if the) 
were to represent one or two, ratlin 

than all media within the agenC) it- 
self." 

How does this work out in actual 
practice? sponsor derived the follow- 
ing conclusions about the iv\l! buy- 
er's relationships within the agency, 
with the client and with members "I 
the radio-h industr) : 

• \- the "flow-chart" of buyei re- 
sponsibilities (see page 27) shows, the 

primar) job of the Y&R all-media 
liner i- in planning where and bow 
the client's media advertising funds 
are to he spent. In making these bud- 
gel recommendations, Y&R buyers 
draw upon information gathered from 
the account group, of which the) are 
members, as well a- upon the research 
and merchandising departments. 

• Y&R buyers have personal and 
continuous contact with the client ad 
manager, fhey're free t" discuss with 



him. eiih.r direct]) or through Y&R's 

Contact man within the aCCOUnl gTOUp, 

-m h problems a- media appropriations 
ami budget recommendations for gpe- 
i 1 1 1 < markets. 

• I lie ^ &R bu) ei can ill aw upon a 

9peciall) set-up "spot availabilit) unit" 

under l!a\ June- (formei sales mana- 

for k< .1 l.-l \ . Houston I for his 

spot radii, ami t\ information. Jones 

maintains continuous rep contact at a 

rale of 20 I" 25 rep \i-il- a day, and 

channels the resulting information in 
the various buyers whom it might 
concei n. 

■'\\ e in thi- unit do nothing hut 
-i "ill .'lit availabilities and rate infor- 
mation, -aid lone-, who's assisted 1>\ 
two uiil-. ""We follow through on sta- 
tion relations ami detail- ol time buy- 
ing, like arrangements for make-goods. 
We also gather competitive broadcast 
information." 

Here - how thi- unit, set up less than 
two years ago, operates on a day-by- 
da) basis: 

\ buyer might (nine t.. Jones with 
the following situation: One of hi- cli- 



ARTICLE IN BRIEF 



r 

Entering its fourth year, Y&R s all- 
media buying system has been stream- 
lined. Buyer's burden of detail work 
is taken over by new media services 
like spot availability unit. Here's how 
Y&R all-media buyers function on plan- 
ning level and how they serve clients. 



eiit-. with \ dollars to Bpend, want- to 
go into markets \ and I! al a spo ified 
frequency . He outlines his othei spe- 
■ iln requirements, w hi. h i ould in- 
voke age brackets, t \ j ■•• of program- 
ing, ami similar pertinent fa< I 

"'I have to make a recommendation 

lo the i ontacl man and the client on 

Thursda) morning," the buyer might 

tell Jones on \Imiila\ alien n. 

It's then U|p to Jones In -' OUl "Ut 

suitable availabilities in markets \ and 
B toi the buyei b) Wednesda) after- 
noon, so the Inner can include them in 
In- iei nmmendalii.il ..n I hur-das 

morning. 

"We also serve as a clearing house 
l.ii reps, -a\ - Jones. "I .nee. 

a rep might i all "r — t - • j » in w ith the 
information that a certain half-hour 
-\ ii< li> it>il him w ill open up in I U 
ln.it ami New ( >i lean- at I ertain - 
lied dale- iii iln- next few weeks. It's 
then up t" us in channel thi- informa- 
tion tu buyers who we know want to 

nil. those markets. Ihi- dot 
mean that the rep can't and d 
the buyers -tonal!) . But 
save hi- time and the line ..f the buy- 
ers b) routing the information al 
of time.'" 

The 2(> buyers on the fourth flooi 
^ &R"s New i" >>rk office, like tie 
S mi Fran* i- , Los 

I '■ h part of 

'int grou - - ' '•<! to the i 
they're servicing. \- members of I 

_ tps, the) -it in on all plan- 
ning me. tings the media 



SPONSOR 



2(> .i \\t un L957 



_,,, 



All-media buyers, assigned to account groups, 
plan clients' media budgets and strategy, draw upon 
media services to help in detailed carry-through 



department and counselling <m prob- 
lems related to media. 

"Right now I'lii writing plans for 
two products for the next fiscal year 
starting in \|>ril." Warren Bahr. one 
of the Y&R all-media men, told SPON- 
SOR. "In these plans I'll be statin" the 
objectives, the how's and why's of 
spending the client's dollars. Before 
starting on these plans. I attended 
man\ product group meetings with the 
account executive (we call him con- 
lad man), research, merchandising 
men. print copy and art men and 
lele\ ision-radio copy and art men." 



Bahr's final budget and media rec- 
ommendation will be based in part 
upon information he gathers from the 
research department representative in 
his product group I Who buys product 
units and where?) and the merchan- 
dising department man, who makes the 
forecast on sales based upon units sold 
in the year previous and other factors. 

'"Our budget recommendation is 
based upon the sales forecast and the 
proportion of each unit that's to be 
used for advertising,"' said Bahr. "We 
make our recommendation on budget 
and media at the same time as the copy 



for the campaign is being worked on." 
While the planning function is the 
one Y&R considers the buyer's most 
valuable contribution, he's actually re- 
-pnnsible, too, for (1) plans adjust- 
ments required while a campaign is in 
progress. l2i regular operational de- 
tail like checking estimates, station 
lineups, billings and (3) maintaining 
relations with media representatives. 

Bahr illustrated the "plans adjust- 
ment" function with a letter he'd re- 
ceived that morning from the ad man- 
ager of one of his clients. The client 
felt that his spot radio announcements 
were spread too thin in some markets, 
and he suggested a general redistribu- 
tion. 

"Basically, this means that I re- 
evaluate the campaign, and it might 
mean some shifting of schedules or a 



in iiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiii! minimi imiimi iiiiiiiiiiiiniii iiimiiii mini iiiiiiiiiiimimiiiiiiini iiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiui iimiiiiiiiiiiiii i iiiimiiiiiiiiim imiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiimiiimi inimiiiiiiii iiiimiiiiiiiimii^^H 



Y&R media teams handle near $200 million with 26 buyers in N » 



Account 



American Home Foods, Inc. 
i Chef Boy-Ar-Dee Quality 
Foods, Inc.; Dennison Div.) 

Beech Nut — Life Savers 
Beech Nut Cum 

Life Savers 

Bigelow-Sanford Carpet Co., Inc. 

Borden Company, The (All Bor- 
den: Cheese Division) 

Borden Company, The ( Borden 
Food Products Co.; Industrial 
Products Div.; Borden's Farm 
Prods. Div.; Special Prodts. I 

Boyle-Midway, Inc. 13-1 Oil; 
Plastic Wood) 

Bristol Aircraft 

Bristol-Myers Co. 
Bufferin 

Sal Hepatica & Vitalis 

Cluett-Peabody (Boys Wear; 
Dress Shirt-: Sportswear) 

Dictaphone Corp. 

Drackett Company (Drano; 
Windex; Dazy Mist I 

Drake Bakeries, Inc. (Drake's 
( lakes and ( jiokie- I 

Duff) Mott Company, Inc. 
i Mott's \pple Product-: 
Clapps; Sunsweet Prunes 
& Juices) 

Esterbrook Pen Company, The 

Ethyl Corporation 

Ford Motor < Y Y. liaison) 

four Roses Distillers ( !o. I I oui 
Roses Whiskies, Gin I 

( reneral < ligar < o. 

Roberl Hum- & \ an Dyke 

While Owl & Wm. Penn 
• igai ( orp. 



Buyer and assistant 

Russell Young, Adelaide Hat- 
ton & Eleanor Paulsen 



William Dollard, Marie Fitz- 

patrick 
Arthur Jones, James Scala 

Donald Foote, Mary King 

Russell Young, Adelaide Hat- 
ton & Eleanor Paulsen 

Robert Kowalski, Bertrand Hopt 



Arthur Jones, James Scala 

Joseph St. Georges, Joseph 
O'Brien 

Seymour Drantch, Dolores 
Kreisbuch & Jack Hagerty 
Robert Kowalski, Bertrand Hopt 

Frank Grady, John Warner & 
Clara Haber 

Donald Foote, Mary King 

William Dollard, Marie Fitz- 
patrick 

Arthur Jones, James Scala 

Russell Young, Adelaide Hat- 
ton & Eleanor Paulsen 



Joseph St. Georges, Joseph 

O'Brien 
Thomas Comerford, Marie 

Mooney 
Thomas Comerford, Marie 

Mooney 
Donald Foote, Mary King 



George Hoffman, Genevieve 

Hurley 
Thomas Viscardi, Joseph Raf- 

fetto 



Account 



General Electric Company 
Appliances 

Tv Receivers Division 
Housewares & Radio Receiver 
Div. 

General Foods Corp. 
All Products, Corporate 

Walter Baker Chocolate 

Baker Frosting Mixes 

Franklin Baker Coconut 

Birds Eye 

Calumet Baking Powder 
Certo & Sure Jell, Jiffy Jell 
D-Zerto Dessert 

Jell-0 Products 

Kernel Nuts 

La France, Go, Satina 

Log Cabin Syrup & Country 

Kitchen Syrup 
Mapel Del. Wigwam 
Minute Products 

Postum 

Sanka & Instant Sanka 

Swans Down Cake Flour 

Swans Down Cake Mixes 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., 
Inc., (Goodyear Tires; Life- 
guard Tubes: Institutional) 

Gulf Oil Corp. 

Henredon Furniture Industries 
International Silver Company 
I 1847 Rogers Bros.: Interna- 
tional Sterling: Stainless by 
International: Wm. Roger- 
Son: Anchor Rogers Sterling; 
Promotion Division i 



Buyer and assistant 



Arthur Meagher, George 

Tichenor & Richard Morse 
Arthur Jones, James Scala 
Vance Hicks, Eugene McCarthy 



Warren Bahr, Thomas McClin- 
tock & Robert Gleckler 

Warren Bahr, Thomas McClin- 
tock & Robert Gleckler 

John Henderson, Robert Foun- 
tain 

Warren Bahr, Thomas McClin- 
tock & Robert Gleckler 

Lorraine Ruggiero, Edith John- 
son 

Kay Brown, Ann Purtill 

Kay Brown, Ann Purtill 

Lorraine Ruggiero, Edith John- 
son 

William Dollard, Marie Fitz- 
patrick 

Kay Brown, Ann Purtill 

John Henderson, Robert Foun- 
tain 

Kay Brown, Ann Purtill 

Kay Brown, Ann Purtill 

John Henderson, Robert Foun- 
tain 

Warren Bahr, Thomas McClin- 
tock & Robert Gleckler 

John Henderson, Robert Foun- 
tain 

Warren Bahr, Thomas McClin- 
tock & Robert Gleckler 

Warren Bahr, Thomas McClin- 
tock & Robert Gleckler 

John Flournoy, Bette Ruth White 



Frank Grady, John Warner & 

Clara Haber 
Arthur Jones, James Scala 
George Hoffman, Genevieve 

Hurley 



iiiiini iiniiiim i . imiiiiiini . ■, . , !' , iii" 



iM'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimiiiiiiminii' i iiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii miiiimmiiiiiiiinii < 



recommendation foi an additional ap 
pi opi ial ion and more buj ing, said 
Bahr. "In thi- instance, aftei check* 
inj; out obje< lives, I ma) find that, 
since i In- emphasis in the < ampaign 
is in another medium, the current spot 
i ad ia i "\ ci age is adequate in t < - ■ ma of 
'in o\ >■! all objectives." 

The significant point .1 1 »• • 1 1 r 1 1 1 i — 
"plans adjustment' 1 procedure is the 
fad thai the ad^ ei tising manage] ol .1 
major brand addressed bis • j 1 n-i \ lo 
the buyer directly, and that the buyer 
himself is the ultimate source "I such 
media decisions. He, <>f course, re- 
ports to an associate media directoi 
assigned t.> the account The associate 
media director reviews all plans and 
works in a supervisor) capacity, with 
the buyers assigned t" In- accounts. 
1 Please turn t<> page 7 1 1 




£> 



k (see assignments below) 



Account 



i I lohnson ' Bab) IV. >.t- 
|)i\ ision : Surgical Dr< — 
Division 1 
. I tit.. Thomas J. 1 Soups 

inl ( ... I'. ' Kent < iga- 

- 
[iolii.ni Life [nsuram e Co 

Mi < iormack Lines, Inc. 

al Shawmul Mank of 
..n 

ial Sugar Refining < .... 
(Jack Frost; Vrbuckle) 

. Inc. 1 Greeting ( lards I 

I ape ( lorp. 1 Texi el 
ophane Tape; Bondex 
ldin^ Tape; IVxi-.l 1 

ial Products Corp., The 
idess & < oets) 

ros 1 Piel's Beer) 

Bros, In, . 

r & Gamble Company, 
■ (Cheer & Spic 'n Span I 



ogton Rami. Inc. i Electric 

wr ' 

Typewriter ( .... Inc. 

rixed Div. of Cluett- 

iIk)«I\ 

>>n< ("ornpain 

r Sewing Machine < 0. 

Spaulding & Bros., Inc. 

Inc. 

•• Magazine, Time. Inc. 
orporate 

its Illustrated Magazine 
ne Magazine 

lers Insurance Companies, 
- -\ Rubicam, Inc. 



Buyer and assistant 

Joseph St. Georges, Joseph 
O'Brien 



Thomas Comerford, Marie 
Mooney 

Warren Bahr, Thomas McClin- 

tock & Robert Gleckler 
John Flournoy, Bette Ruth White 
Arthur Jones, James Scala 
George Hoffman, Genevieve 

Hurley 
Arthur Jones, James Scala 

George Hoffman, Genevieve 

Hurley 
Joseph St. Georges, Joseph 

O'Brien 

Kay Brown, Ann Purtill 

Thomas Viscardi, Joseph Raf- 

fetto 
Arthur Jones, James Scala 

Florence Dart, Catherine 
Brostrom 

Charles Buccieri, Donald Proc- 
ter & Marcia Roberts 

Frank Grady, John Warner & 
Clara Haber 

Lorraine Ruggiero, Edith John- 
son 
Thomas Comerford, Marie 

Mooney 
John Flournoy, Bette Ruth White 
Donald Foote, Mary King 
Fronk Grady, John Warner & 

Clara Haber 
Frank Grady, John Warner & 

Clara Haber 
Joseph St. Georges, Joseph 

O Brien 
Warren Bahr, Thomas McClin- 

tock 4 Robert Gleckler 
George Hoffman, Genevieve 

Hurley 
W. E. Matthews 




/ 



Peter Levathes, v. p., heads 186-man department 



Executive assistant to Lcvothcs 

V Hilton I . "!'<:■ " \fat 
Associate directors: 

b rank ( oulter 

I . •■ ■ / flick 
James English, Jr. 
Georgi LeUhner 
bi/u ard Mni Donald 
< harles SA elton 

II > ■ r-. Sparks 
Assistant directors: 

Kirk Greiner 
Lloyd Harris 
Thomas Lynch 
Coordinator, spot tv-radio: 
Jr. 



:• 



Media office manager: 
Jan 

.1 : Cynth 
Media files, ■ I -i ta and information: 
I ■ ' ' ' 
Supervisor of operations: 
ard /'. t am iman 
.-lit : 
Willie 

' 
I .■• 
Publicati 

Johanna Rrinhardt 
- 
Budget control supervisor: 






'.,. mini 




I this we fight for [We fight for regular publication 

of spot tr and radio expenditures of companies comparable 

■ to figures mailable for all other major media. We believe 

thai main advertisers it ill fail to recognize the stature of 

the spot media until spot spending comes out in the open." 



An industry milestone: 

SPOT RADIO SPENDING BY PRODUCTS! 

Station Representatives Association releases industry's first summary 
of the types of advertisers using spot radio and what they're spending 



m or the first time in the history of 
radio, the industry is beginning to 
know exactly where its spot revenue 
is coming from. 

This week — thanks to the collective 
cllorts of the members of the Station 
Representatives Association — agencies, 
advertisers and the entire radio in- 
dustrj have their first statistical tabu- 
lation of the product groups which 
invest in the spot medium and a total 
dollar figure on the amounts invested. 

This crash through the silence bar- 
rier of spending concludes at least a 
decade of intensified search for the 
answer to how the industry could col- 
lect dollar data which would add 
further definition to the depth of spot 
radio and provide agencies and ad- 
vertisers with \ ital information. 

This new report — the second giant 
step toward revelation of complete dol- 
lar figures — covers the amounts spent 
b\ 31 different product categories in 
spot radio during the third quarter of 
1956. Based on compilations of the 
New York accounting firm of Price. 
Waterhouse & Co., the summary 
covers billings for the months of Jul\. 
\ugust and September. The first step 
taken 1>\ SUA: publication of monthly 
estimates, for the first time last year 
on total spot radio investments. The 
next logical step, third in the progres- 
sion, would be collection of spot spend- 
in- data by individual advertiser. 

In the third quarter period on which 
the product category spending figures 
are released, total billing reaches a 
high of $33,609,000 in spot radio. Of 
tlii- sum, the biggest single contribu- 
tion wa- made b\ clients in the food 
and grocer) product industries, some 
114,357. Second biggesl product 



group was tobacco and supplies, w ith 
a total of S4.906.914, followed b\ 
automotive, with $2,991,201, and drug 
products, with $2,856,765. Ale, beer 
and wine accounts added up to some 
>2.621.602. 

A complete report on third quarter 
spending appears in the chart on the 
opposite page, along with a compari- 
son of dollar investments for the same 
product groupings for spot television 
during the same quarter. Spot spend- 
ing in tv came out in the open at the 
instigation of the Television Bureau 
of Advertising, which in the past year 
has published a quarterly report on 
expenditures analyzed both as to prod- 
uct group and to individual adver- 
tisers. 

Despite this newest milestone in the 
history of radio, agencies and clients 
are still eager to get more detail. 
They're interested in knowing what 
tobacco companies, as a whole, are 
doing in spot radio. But, more urgent 
to them, they want to know specific- 
all\ what the Liggett & Myers" and P. 
Lorillards are spending. This is the 
type of information which could evolve 
from the initial product category com- 
pilation by SRA. 

Product class information will be 
released regularb after each quarter, 
according to Larry Webb, managing 
director of SRA. I rider his direction. 
and that of Frank Headley. president 
of SRA and of H-R Representatives, 
the member rep firms have set up a 
system which will enable subsequent 
reports to be developed in detail. 

It took a lot of work — and money 
to set up the system which forms the 
basis of the present SRA service: (1) 
monthl) total dollar estimates of spot 



radio spending and (2) spending by 
product categories quarterK . 

SRA is using the same basic prod- 
uct category list adopted by the Tele- 
vision Bureau of Advertising for its 
spot expenditure reports. There are a 
few minor differences, however. SRA 
has added new categories under " *mi»- 
cellaneous." omitting three TvB major 
categories: sporting goods, bicycles 
and toys; stationery and office equip- 
ment: and television, radio, phono- 
graph and musical instruments. 

Agency men and their clients are 
enthusiastic about this additional in- 
formation on the dimensions of spot 
radio. But they still look to the dav 
when more detail on spending of indi- 
vidual advertisers will be available. 

There are several possible ways of 
compiling such data. The most direct 
and complete would be getting radio 
stations themselves to open their 
books. Thus far. this has proved to be 
a point of no return for anyone who 
has tried to prv information from 
them. Another idea is to establish a 
central clearing bouse, where an out- 
side concern would sort confidential 
information from station billing fig- 
ures and come up with final totals. 
Still another concept, and one which 
has gained the most backing from ad- 
vertising agencies and advertisers, is 
the suggestion that the plan — whatever 
it is — be administered by Radio Ad- 
vertising Bureau. RAB. at this point, 
sees no feasible way of setting up and 
launching such a collection program. 

Whatever the technique used, buy- 
ers think that some day. somehow, 
they'll be able to peruse a listing and 
find out exactly what their competi- 
tion i> -pending in -pot radio. ^ 






SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 



Product category 


s P 


of r.idio 




Spot tv 


Listed alphabetically 


Dollar figure 


Rank 


of total 


Dollar figure 


Vgl il lllllllr 


$ 1,277,142 


9 


3.8 





Vie, beei . w ine 


2,621,502 


5 


7.8 


8,463,000 


Amusements, ruin tainmenl 


235,263 


20 


.7 




lutomol i\ e 


2,991,201 


3 


8.9 


1,827,000 


Building material, fixtures, |>.iini« 


201,654 


21 


.6 


T'Jl.i 


Clothing and ,iici — lories 


134,436 


25 


.4 


1,861,1 


1 infections ami soft <li inks 


907,493 


13 


2.7 


1,620,000 


Consumer Ben ices 


1,041,879 


10 


3.1 


2,494,000 


( oamel ics and toilel r iea 


1,814,886 


7 


5.4 


8,950,000 


Dental products, tooth paste, etc. 


302,481 


18 


.9 


2,742,000 


Drug products 


2,856,765 


4 


8.5 


:>.2'<",. i 


r ood ami grocer) produi ts 


5,814,357 


1 


17.3 


21,775,000 


Garden supplies and equipment 


100,827 


26 


.3 


38,000 


1 ■ isoline and lubricants 


1,949,322 


6 


5.8 


108,000 


Hotels, resorts, restaurants 


67,218 


30 


.2 


73,000 


Household cleaners, soaps, polishes, waxes 


1,041,879 


11 


3.1 


592, 


1 [ousehold appliances 


268,872 


19 


.8 


1,446,000 


Household Furnishings 


67,218 


28 


.2 


897, 


Hun-.!). i|<l laundrj products 


403,308 


15 


1.2 


1,284,000 


Household paper products 


100,827 


27 


.3 


1,016,000 


Household general 


369,699 


17 


1.1 


~>1 1. HI Ml 


NotlOnS 


33,609 


31 


.1 


162,000 


Pel products 


201,654 


22 


.6 


;: 1<m ion 


Publications 


403,308 


16 


1.2 


184, 


Sporting g I». bicycles, toys 








79,000 


Stationery, office equipmenl 








23,000 


television, radio, phonograph, 
musical instruments 











Tobacco products and supplies 


4,906,914 


2 


14.6 


7,82 >. 


Transportation and travel 


974,661 


12 


2.9 


542, 


\\ atches, jeweln, . cameras 


67,218 


29 


.2 


i.i.::. 


Other 










Trading stamps 








.11 Ml 


Miscellaneous produi ts 








ooo 


Miscellaneous stores 

Dairy and margarine products 




23 


.5 


; ; i 


168,045 


r inance and insurance 


168,045 


23 


.5 




Religious 


504,135 


14 


1.5 




Miscellaneous 


1,613,232 


8 


4.8 




Totals 


$33,609,000 






> 



SPONSOR 



2(> JAMJAR! 195' 



33 






SPOT TV SPARKS NEHI EXPANSION 

Successful franchise dealers in current markets attract new dealers in 

other markets. Nehi Corp., makers of Royal Crown, grows on this formula 



I In- soft drink empire known as 
Nehi Corporation has been fanning 
out for more than half a century. Its 
capital is where it always was — Colum- 
bus, Ga.. but it now numbers 437 pri- 
vately-financed bottlers throughout du- 
ll. S. Most of these are in the South- 
east and Southwest. Today, Nehi is 
in the process of consolidating its 
recent gains and is poised to improve 
its position in markets it now holds. 
Here is where spot television comes 
into the picture. 

"In a business that is built on ven- 
ture capital from individual bottlers," 
sa\s Bob Tannehill, Nehi's account su- 
peiivisor at Compton Advertising, "you 
can onlj attract new franchises by 
making your present ones successful."" 



Nehi tries to fulfill its objectives with 
a multi-million dollar air budget, in 
spot TV and the balance in spot radio. 

More than a year ago, Nehi Ad 
Manager Frank Gorman moved the ac- 
count from BBDO to Compton. It is a 
big product line of 41 beverage flavors 
including Nehi Chocolate Drink, Diet- 
Rite Cola. Par-T-Pak. and the popular 
Royal Crown Cola. National distribu- 
tion of this line is almost complete. 
Nehi and the Compton Agency are 
e\er on the alert to the possibility of 
adding key markets. 

1956 accomplishments suggest they 
are well on the way to this goal. De- 
spite a cold spring and summer in 
most parts of the nation ( no greater 
blight can hit the bottling industry I , 



Nehi sales advanced over the previous 
year. On the franchise front, 6 new 
bottlers joined the Nehi family. Among 
the most recent of these was a new 
plant in the major market of Denver. 
In the offing are a number of new 
metropolitan markets about to be 
opened. Also in the offing: a stepped 
up spot tv campaign for 1957 that will 
start earlier and last longer. 

Last year's tv campaign found Nehi 
beverages and Royal Crown cola ad- 
vertised in about 250 markets. Com- 
mercial copy was aimed squarely at 
the consumer. Nehi used radio in areas 
where tv 7 availabilities or coverage 
didn't meet Compton standards. 

What are these standards? Gene- 
vieve Schubert, Nehi's timebuyer at the 




Strategy for Nehi Corp. spot t\ campaign is planned by (1 to r) Bui) Tanne- 
hill. account supervisor at Compton Advertising; Roger Collier, assistant account 
executive, Compton and Frank Gorman, the Columbus. Ga.. firm's ad manager 






"Miss Royal Crown" portrayed by Runny Cooper is starred 
in llii- tv commercial titled Court Jester. It is one of two "spec- 
tacular" commercials produced by Nicholas Gibson of Compton 



Packaging lias recently been redesigned in a Nehi moderniza- 
tion program. Royal Crown Cola comes in both cans and bottles, 
is big siller in multi-package beverage line of 41 flavors in- 
cluding Nehi Chocolate Drink. Par-T-Pak and Diet-Rite Cola 



34 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 




"Mardi Cras" is title of 1 1 x i — one-minnte commercia] iluit li.nl < ,i-t « > f two stars and 20 dancers. It too »a- built amuml Miss R I rown 



agency, watches audience composition 
closely. Slu- uses - 11 "-. ID's and min- 
utes in prime nighttime hours. 

She aims for the whole famib at 

once (" whel their thir-t as a group. 
When Miss Schubert does use spot 
radio, she bins earl) morning, noon 
and later afternoon. 

"Ever) spot buj we make, says Ac- 
count Supervisor Tannehill, "is a care- 
fully considered purchase. "We've 
got to keep our bottlers happy." 

Apparent!) thej are keeping the 
bottlers bappy. A number of them 
have written to Nehi thanking them 
for the qualit) of their commercials. 
A lot of the franchise dealers are tying 
in to the Nehi spot campaign with 
campaigns of their own at the local 



level. I be) arc assisted in this b) co- 
op mone) from the Nehi Corp., t h. 
amount based on a careful!) developed 

formula. This iimnn goes to local 

t\. radio, newspapers and promotion. 
\!>out five of the larger bottlers, 
with substantia] advertising budgets ol 
their own, now hill with Compton be- 
cause the] feel it bettei coordinates 

ARTICLE IN BRIEF 

Nehi Corp. now has 437 franchise 
dealers in the U. S. It supports them 
with heavy spot tv advertising in 
about 250 markets. It assists them 
with their individual marketing prob- 
lems. In this way it keeps dealers 
selling and happy, attracts new ones. 



their local efforts with the parent com- 
panj s campaign. Several others are 
considering a similar step Hies* 
♦•II it»- accounts are watched over bj 
elius Braren, < ompton's market- 
ing man on Nehi-Royal < rown. Comp- 
ton cop) w rii' ire their commer- 
cials and ads; Compton's media de- 
partment make- the local time and 
spa< e bu) s. 

\- marketing man. Braren - ti 
divided about equal!) between trouble- 
shooting and promotion on a national 
-i ale. It a -..ft spot in - 
or a problem ari-<-- in a market. 
Braren i- packed off to the site of the 
trouble. There he'll -[.end a- much 
time with the bottler a- i- needed t<. 
analwe the situation. Then he n 

-.ecific recommendation t" Nehi 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 



35 



NEHI ontinued . . . 

Corp.; it ma) involve an) "I man) 
areas — pricing, media, packaging, pro- 
motion. Besides this, he follows 
through nn the planned cycles of pro- 
motion. To assist franchise dealers to 
tie in with the spot t\ campaign, 
Compton lets them know when \rlii 
announcements are on. 

Marketing at \ehi Corp. begins the 
da) a new franchise is signed. A field 
crew from Columbus, Ga., is run in to 
help set up the plant, get distribution 
under way, oversee the executive ma- 
chinery. And this emphasis on mar- 
keting has even rebounded to head- 
quarters. Several important changes 
and additions in the executive ranks 
have been made in the past \ear. 

Another impact of marketing is the 
complete package redesign of the Nchi 
line including the Royal Crown bottle 
and carton. The old red. black and 
yellow R.C. label has given way to a 
crisp new red and white one: the bot- 
tle itself has gone through a sort of 
classical streamlining. The new pack- 
aging is designed not only to attract 
the shopping housewife but to make 
that housewife proud to put the bottle 
down on her cocktail table when she 
entertains. The problems involved in 
this modernization program are con- 
siderable. This multi-brand line is 
also multi-package in order to compete 
in different markets. Royal Crown, 
for example, is bottled in quarts ( Pepsi 
and Cola Cola are in 26 oz. bottles), 
and in either 10 or 12 oz. bottles and 
cans ( depending on what the compe- 
tition is doing in the market). R. C. 
leads in sales among canned colas. 

It is Royal Crown that gets the full- 
est treatment in advertising. Last sum- 
mer, a brace of one-minute "spectacu- 
lar" commercials were produced for 
this cola. Titled "Mardi Gras" and 
"Court Jester." they were written un- 
der the supervision of Jake Bo\d. 
Compton copy group head, and pro- 
duced by .Nicholas Gibson of Comp- 
ton. "Mardi Gras" has 21 separate 
scenes and a mix involving six differ- 
ent sound tracks. It has a cast of 20 
dancers, and during the filming nearl) 
half a ton of confetti was used. "Court 
Jester" features a cast of 12. The star 
"I each commercial is Bunn) Cooper, 
"Mi-s Ko\al ( 'low ii." 

The commercials were shown during 
September and October. The) will see 
use again this year. ^ 






"They're all watching tv 
— except our customers" 

WT AC. Michigan, surprised Flint merchants \ 
the sales impact of a nighttime radio campaign 



ith 



■ lint, Mich., is a booming, industrial center with almost 
. •)'< t\ set saturation. Too often when a salesman attempted 
to sell nighttime radio to merchants of the city he was told: 
"they re all watching telexision." \nd this was the last word 
until WTAC tried a little experiment. 

Starting at 9:00 p.m. Saturday with a saturation schedule 
for Gross Point Inn, a drive-in restaurant, the station pitched 
three items. No one expected much, least of all the owner. He 
was willing to gamble, but not to hire extra help. After all. he 
reasoned. they're all watching television. 

Although the announcements said the drive-in would be open 
until 1:00 a.m.. a weary proprietor closed up at 11:00 p.m. — 
all out of food, exhausted and wondering if it was worth that 
much work. He chased 60 cars out of his driveway and many 
others were disappointed when they found the Inn closed. 

In quick succession, as the story spread, the station signed 
up a department store and sold 120 dozen pairs of children's 
training pants, almost 200 boys sport shirts, and 78 pairs of 
slacks. WTAC ran schedules for: a bar whose sole entertain- 
ment was an organist and packed it on an off night: Lint/. 
Bros. Trailer Lot. where with clever copy, almost 300 customers 
were attracted and $45,000 in actual business was written: a 
jewelry shop, a gift store, a construction company — all with re- 
sults that belied the hours when the announcements were aired. 

David Mendelsohn, manager of WTAC. says the station has 
"sold more deals to good merchants — livewires — than in the 
days before television. ' He suggested these three points as a 
key to nighttime selling. 1. Work with the account to see 
what will pull — then try to put a little more into the cop\ : 
2. Sell blanket packages that force an account to buy a quantit\ 
of announcements: 3. Forget tv — some people don't watch the 
flickering screen. You don't need a half-a-million people to 
sell 100 shirts. All you need is 100 customers who will 
listen to your story and buy your product. ^ 




Maternity shop had some terrific items, but the appeal could be only 
to a narrow segment of the audience. Phi] Goodman >>f Goodman's Col- 
lege Dorm displays one of the 136 maternirj -ml- -old in one Thursday 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 




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TV'S IMPACT ON 



AGAZINES 



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■ 



one-v -I.' .in 



mo* 

apreo 



American Magazine End? commit 
igazine ended lun iJ*' 
la eighty-year history yesterday ™ N 

»-hrn the August edition went on cloud ovr 

the newsstands. At the end it Pi°P'- 

had 2.550." ' ^WWibfits- An an- a '^ ' 

noun 

features 

Collier's 

Compan 

Cornor' 






op/- 



° n * 322- ******** 



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Ju>t because it has outstripped magazines in ad dollar 
volume, mu>t tv lake the blame for publishing failures? 



i 



- television tolling the death-knelL 
fur magazines? This is a question 
that lia» been raised 1>\ both layman 
ami media expert in the decade since 
t\ entered the communications arena. 
I be answer is thai t\ ma) bave one 
hand on tlir bell-rope. Bui the other 
band belongs to the publishing iiidii-- 
ir\ itself. The recenl demise of Imeri- 
i nn Magazine, Collier's and Human's 
Home Companion comes nearer t>> 
suicide than murdei . 

1 rtainl) i\ . which edged close t" 
- 1 ' i billion mark in advertis 
dollar volume during 1956, stands 
uain little friim their passing. CoU 
and " Oman's Home togethei shared 
onl\ $23^4 million ad revenue during 
the first 11 months of 1956. The 
chances of television inheriting tlii- 
are shght. If re-distributed at all. it 
probahl) will go :•■ "tln-r print media, 



.and possibl) i" i .» < I i « ». Tlii> i» tli»- gen- 
eral feeling within the advertising 
agencies. 

I M epl t" the ver) ) oung m li" have 
onl) recentl) ai quired t h •• i i ti r ~t graj 
flannel suil and a « J » — k in an ad a 
i j . tin- passing of the ( rowell-( olliei 

gazine famil) particularly ( <>lh- 
'■r's is \ iewed as a traged] . 
a sympatico between tin' long-estab- 
lished magazine and tin- veteran ad- 
man thai goes fai .!>■. ■;,.•!- than t! ■ 
between him and t\ . Ba< k in the 
..I even tin 1 '20's, he cul hi* teeth on 

_ i/iiif la) "Hi- and copy. H«- 
achieved prominence in hi< profession 
and (50,000 a veai on those f"iir- 
color double-trucks. His loyalties 

■ have been divided b) a shrewd 
sense of business, bul his first l"\.- re- 
mains the printed magazine ) 

\ look at the 'hart on the following 






First calculated year found tv's ad volume meager 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiii i Hiiiiiiiiii 

19 4 9 



Magazines 
Weeklies _ $245.4 

Women's.. si 28.6 

General, farm $118.5 

TOTAL .. $492.5 



Television 
Network $ 29.4 



Spot 
Local 



$ 9.2 
$ 19.2 



TOTAL .. $ 57.8 



=1111111 Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllll :. ! IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIK 



But here are comparisons for past three years 

|iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiil ilium iiiiiiiii mm iiiimi i hiiiiiiiiii iiiimiimiiiiiiim mini illuming 

19 5 4 



Magazines 
Weeklies $362.7 

Women's ... $151.9 
General, farm $153.3 



TOTAL 



7.9 



Television 
Network . $417.9 

Spot _ $205.2 

Local .. $180.5 

TOTAL $803.6 



fin mi nnimnnnnmnn miiiiiiiini n iiiimi 



Magazines 



19 5 5 



Weeklies .. $395.0 

Women's .. ....$160.0 

General, farm $168.5 

TOTAL ....$723.5 



Television 



Network . $520.0 

Spot ... ..$265.0 

Local __ ...$220.0 

TOTAL ... $1,005.0 



pinniimiininniiininn miiiimiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiii minim mi i mum in m mum mini inmimninniHiinii i s 



19 5 6 



Magazines 



.2 



Weeklies 

Women's .. 

Bus., farm, gen. $235.7 

TOTAL .. $723.6 



Television 



Network . $640.0 

Spot. $325.0 

Local .. $270.0 

TOTAL $1,235.0 



a n ii mi iminiiiiiim imiiiiiiiinim iiiiiiiiiiiiiim imiiminnimim limn mn mm mil iimiiiiiiiiimiiniimmi 

ALL DOLLAR FIGURES IN ABOVE CHARTS ARE IN MILLIONS 

SOURCES: 1949, 1954 and 1955 data prepared bj McCann Erlckion for Printer's Ink. 1956 
magazine flguri I'm L95I tl Bguret from T\ I! 



page will show that the magazine has 
not been deserted for tv. Although 
1954 was the year that saw tv overtake 
and pass the magazine in advertising 
revenue, it must also be noted that 
magazine take in ad dollars has 
showed a steady increase amounting to 
nearly 509? hi the years since 1949 
when tv got into the race. To lav the 
blame for publishing failures at tv's 
doorstep is unfair. But to call tv the 
catalyst that is changing the magazine 
concept — and it must change to sur- 
vive — is surely true. 

Bernard P. Gallagher, of New York 
City, is a man who has been close to 
publishing and its problems for a quar- 
ter century. He is a magazine and ad- 
vertising agency negotiator as well as 
president of World Wide Publications, 
Inc. and American Business Journals. 
He is publisher of The Gallagher Re- 
port which is circulated to 5,000 ad- 
vertising and publishing executives. 
In an interview with sponsor, he 
summed up tv's impact — good and bad 
— on the magazines. 

"On the bright side of the ledger." 
said Gallagher, "television has stepped 
up magazine revenue. This new, ex- 
pensive medium has increased adver- 
tising budgets and revised the thinking 
of the people who invest them. It has 
raised and enlarged their scope. The 
advertising price-tag seems less exorbi- 
tant than in pre-tv days. The client 
who becomes conditioned to plunking 
down $80,000 for 60 minutes of tv 
tends less to suffer nervous chills when 
presented with a single-insertion bill 
for $50,000 from Life or Saturday 
Evening Post. 

"Now for the negative side," Gal- 
lagher continued. "Television has 
made the media buyer more choosey. 
Where he previously spread his adver- 
tising budget over many magazines, 
be now is analyzing his buvs more 
carefully and limiting his budget to 
two or three major ones. For too 
long, too many publishers have felt 
that the advertiser has a responsibil- 
it\ to keep them alive." 

There is no such responsibility. No 
publisher, and — for that matter — no 
radio-tv station manager or network 
has the right to expect it. The opera- 
tion of any medium is a capital ven- 
ture for profit and not a case for sub- 
sidy- 

As Gallagher sees it. the major prob- 
lem of the publishing industry is that 
instead of fearing tv, magazines have 
been busy being afraid of each other. 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 



\\ In should magazines feai i\ ? 
I here are two majoi i easons : 

• I i It's hard f"i magazines t" < om- 

pete foi ad dollai b w ith .1 mass ■ 

(liiini like i\ mi the lone basis "I raw 
circulation numbers. \ magazine 
needs more than a million subscrib- 
ers i" wave before an advertisei who 
maj reach three times thai man) 
homes w ith a i\ show , 

1 2 1 Vele\ ision has changed the en- 
tertainment values .mil habits ■•! the 
Vmerican public, foday, foi example, 
there i- 1 • t obabl) more fi< tion being 
\ iewed than read. 

In amplif) ing point 1 1 < regarding 
mass circulation numbers competition, 
Television Bureau of Advertising has 
presented this comparison 01 the two 
media based on Neil-en and N KI)>: 

\l 10:15 a.m. (EST), 3.1 million 

homo are tuned to t\ which equals the 
combined circulations "I Time and 
Sewsweek. \t II a.m.. t\ equals the 

circulation of l.ooh at 1.1 million. \t 

noon. Ladies Home Journal slips be- 

hind, and t\ is ahead ol all hut tWO 

national magazines, the first of which 

Life is passed at 1 : l> p.m. \t 

7: to p.m.. t\ passes Readers' Digest 

1 1 1 million to 111. 1- million 1. \t Id 
p.m. I\ is watched in more than II! 
million homes. In this comparison, 

neither \ iewer--pet ->et nor reader- -per- 

cop) were counted. 

This 1>\ no means implies that maga- 
zine circulations have fallen o|T since 
i\. Actually, the reverse is true. Since 
the end of World War II. the circula- 
tion ot 30 top genera] consumer maga- 
zines increased 30^5 while the number 

of people in the COUntr) rose l' 1 ', . \n 
Alfred Politz Research, Inc. stud) foi 
Life -how- a higher percentage of thai 

periodical nets into t\ households than 

into non-t\ households. Another sur- 
ve) b) the same research organization 

sponsored In Look and tilled. "The 
Audience- of Nine Magazines" shows 
the same to he true for ever) one of 
the nine major publication- studied 
(including (he late Collier's and // Om- 
an s Home Companion < . 

It has been the elTort to build such 
mass circulations that is part of pub- 
listing's trouble. The expense of get- 
ting and holding subscribers with spe- 
cial oilers and renewals is tremendous. 
Paper and production costs have 
soared. The average profit in the pub- 
lishing industry, after taxes, is onl) 
about 2' L >',. Several years ago, Cos- 
mopolitan not off a ver) shak) finan- 
cial limb In deliberately cutting back 



I 



ARTICLE IN BRIEF 



From a standing start 10 years ago, tv 
has |umpcd tar ahead of magazines in 
ad revenue At the same time it has 
enlarged overall advertising budgets, 
and thus benefited publishing But tv s 
impact on audience habits has been so 
great, magazines may have to change. 

it- rin ill, il i"ii li "in about 3 million In 

I million. The) did this b) eliminat- 
ing all subset iptions ex< ept full-rates. 

I he 1 in illation tb.it u .1- added to ( oh 

lier'i ami Woman's Home when theii 
publishers suspended Imerican l/".*/ 
zine la-t Jul) found the pair with lit- 
tle lime left to enJ0) it. Now it i- a 

question how profitable Look will find 

tin- Subs* 1 iptions it IS taking <>\ ei 
from Colliei I and // Oman S Home. 

When tin- latter two suspended, <■<>!- 
tier's bad 1.2 million circulation and 

Woman's Home bad 1.1 million. Gal- 

laghei Btated frankly: "No compan) 
management wa- evei more blind. 

During the late III- and earl\ '50's 

when the era of t\ competition was 
developing, this management failed to 
invigorate their magazines. "Crowell 
management, Gallagher -aid. "over- 
looked a vital truism oi magazine pub- 
lishing. Magazines usuallj belong to 



.111 er.i W ben It - ...in-, the " 

zine (ad>- 10 survive, magazine* 

... ith tin tin.- Of fl '"//- 

an's Home Companion, he - lid 

"Growth of ts w ith numerous -•■■ 
pi ograms has gi aduall) redui ed the 
need (01 women's service magazines. 
. . . Signs have been apparent foi -i\ 
years " IK didn t respond. 

the top '- 11 magazines, 18 an- now 
iting in tin- nd. I In- ma) 1 
moie fatalities soon. I he magazine's 
problem, a< 1 ording to • lallaghei . is 
11 .. .1 drop in cin ulal ion but in 
readei ship, 

I hi- leads to point 1 2 1 of the 
\ iousl) -mentioned reasons win n 
zines must considei the impact of t\. 
Re iding 1- -till \ ital, but the r • • . 1 < 1 1 n l.- 
habit- have changed and u ha- played 
,1 p.ni in bringing 1b.1t about. The 
name "magazine" means "storehouse 
and this ha- always been the format of 
successful periodicals Bince Daniel De- 
foe began the first one. I he matei ial 
"stored" in magazines 1- ' 1 • informa- 
tion, and ' 2 1 entertainment. 

\ magazine is read alone, b) one 
person at a 1 ime. I \ ma) be v iewed 
b) the famil) group. Entertainment 
fall- neatl) into -roup participation bo 
it i- in this area that h has bad it- 
greatesl effect. People re, id more to- 

I Please mm i<> /.//_. 12 




Bernard P. Gallagher, agarine and advertising ■■■- 

the magazine business ha- been asleep while television with it- and 

hungrier men has been alert and nn the prowL Ten many publishers failed to 
invigorate their maga/ine- during Ial tnd early *50's when the era of 

i\ -et in. Gallagher publishes ' Report f<>r admen and publu 



SPONSOR 



2(> .1 \m\ry 1957 



39 




Sao Antone! 



r 




ABC adds KONO-TV... makes 

San Antonio the nation's 

newest 3-network market 



\"U there arc three in San Antonio! No longer is this major 
cit) .1 two-network market. VBC-TV - newesl primar) affiliate, 
K( )\( ) -TV . has filled out the network pit line in San Antone. 

San Vntonio is the 7 I >t market to !»»■ added t<» th<- \\U. I<|.-- 
vision Network in which it has a full-time exclusive affiliate. Nov 
75.6 per cent <>t the country's I \ homes can see \II< I \ pro- 
grams "live" a figure which will definitely erov in L957. 

That- wh\ we couldn't keep it under our Stetsons >i minute 



longer. San Antonio's in our corral ! 






TV'S IMPACT 

(Continued from page 39) 

da) for information and along lines of 
specific interest than for sheer enter- 
tainment. Magazine fiction is on the 
downgrade, largely replaced by the tv 
drama. 

Dr. Tibor Koeves, v.p. of Institute 
for Motivational Research and its ex- 
pert on communications, says: "Tv is 
not killing the magazines. The big 
magazines are getting bigger and the 
small ones smaller. Once in awhile one 
folds, but not from tv. 

"Americans watch tv but also read, 
though patterns ma) differ from pre- 



vious years. 1 hey are more interested 
in non-fiction than in pre-war vears for 
several reasons: I 1 I they feel a great- 
er responsibility: (2l they feel their 
personal lives are involved in big is- 
sues; (3) thev feel they're living in an 
era of dynamic change and don't want 
to be caught short. 

"In these areas," Dr. Koeves goes 
on, "tv offers some, but not over- 
whelming competition. The tempo of 
t\ is too fast for the viewer to com- 
prehend abstract issues clearly. Peo- 
ple read abstractions at a slower rate 
than fiction. On tv, the visual ele- 
ment constitutes distraction. People 




WHEC Rates FIRST 
with Rochester Listeners 

Out of 360 Quarter-Hours Mondays thru Fridays, 
In Competition with Five other Radio Stations 

WHEC RATES 275 FIRSTS and 10 Ties! 

Here's the Breakdown: 



WHEC 


Station 
B 


Station Stations 
C DE&F 


*FIRSTS in the Morning 115 





5 


*FIRSTS in the Afternoon 70 


50 






FIRSTS in the Evening 90 20 

(10 ties) (10 ties) 

'COMPLETE ROCHESTER PULSE REPORT OCTOBER 1956 

BUY WHERE THEY'RE LISTENING . ■ . ROCHESTER'S TOP-RATED STATION 

WHEC 



S.000 WATTS 



Representatives EVERET T McKINNEY. Inc. New YoiK. Chicago. LEE F.O'CONNEU Co.. Los Angeles. San Fiancisco 



watch mannerisms and background. 
Reading remains more conducive to 
concentration. 

"Magazines may lose their readers 
from a variety of reasons that have 
nothing to do with tv. Our motiva- 
tional explanation for the demise of 
(.oilier s is that people were unahle to 
define its personality sharply. It was 
undistinguished. It was a stranger to 
its readers." 

How do the advertisers and agencies 
view the tv-magazine picture since the 
passing of the Cro well-Collier famih ? 
Don Frost, advertising director for 
Bristol-Myers. sa\s: "We're al\\a\s ap- 
praising all media, hut no special job 
has been initiated because of the Col- 
lier's demise. Our own magazine ad- 
vertising expenditure has actually in- 
creased tremendouslv since tv. We'll 
continue to be in magazines for a 
long time." 

Pete Matthews, executive assistant to 
Y&R's media director, sees Collier's 
ad budgets going into other maga- 
zines — and directh competitive ones — 
rather than into other media. "Usual- 
ly accounts with big broadcast bud- 
gets," he says, "wouldn't require 
money released by one publication for 
their broadcast schedule and would 
hardly do a major re-evaluation just 
because a single magazine is out." But 
in some cases, he does feel, magazine 
thinking may be undergoing a change. 
Among some clients there is a fear 
that the Crowell-Collier disaster may 
be starting a trend. 

The head of an agency media de- 
partment raised this question: If tv 
didn't kill radio, why should it kill 
magazines? "There's an enormous re- 
silience in all advertising media." he 
said. "In the early days of only 63 tv 
markets, we did find magazines suffer- 
ing in those markets. But I think 
they've bounced back." 

Terry Cunningham, advertising di- 
rector for Sylvania. says an adman's 
major consideration is: How much 
does it cost to reach a consumer with 
an effective message'.'' In this, maga- 
zines are not yet prohibitive, though 
tv sometimes is for the smaller adver- 
tiser. As far as his company is con- 
cerned, Cunningham says, "We still 
regard magazines a vital part of a na- 
tional advertising program. 

What kind of magazines will these 
be and how will they survive? The 
immediate solution to survival, accord- 
ing to Callagher. is a raise in adver- 
tising rates. Ip till now, tbe\ have 



42 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 



I ivn afraid to i aise theii i ales on an) 
thing Imi circulation increases. I verj 
other industi \ has i aised its pi ii es to 
keep in line w iili i ising produi 1 1 . . r 1 

costs. \ magazine page i ate ii - ■ 

based mi added cin ulal ion is often 
i .mi elled "Hi \>\ the coal "I thai circu 
I. in. in | > 1 1 « — the li^iiiu.' production costs. 

" Advertisers, agem ies and pub- 
lishers have witnessed .1 sad but effei 
tive demonstration "I the cost squeeze 
facing magazines, 1 says Gallagher. 
" riming i- r i | >•• for much-needed a< 
lion. \ll signs point to that. 

"Look foi publishers both con- 
Burner and trade to tr) to gel .ihr.nl 
of their costs l>\ announcing new ad 
rale increases." I \ move recommended 
bj Gallagher in his Report in October). 
"These %-v ill be cost-of-publishing in- 
creases with no comparable increases 
in circulation guarantees. 

Gallagher regards such rate raises 
as a sensible, constructive move, and 
does not think either advertisers oi 
agencies \\ill quarrel with such action. 

He also feels advertisers and agen- 
cies will show more tolerance for the 
concept ol spreading ad dollars ovei 
a number of publications. '"It ma) onlj 



be tempoi ary, hi bul the id* 1 

..1 1 ..in •iii i atin "ii urn- oi two ma 
zines is due foi .1 setbai k. Ii 
real is tii .111 itude foi agent ies » hose 
future prosperity must inevitabl) de- 
1 1 n. I on the existence "I profitable 
izinet 

So ' lallaghei \ iews the ' rowell- 
( olliei I"— .1- the publishing industry - 
gain 1 ■ r « » v ided the) leai n and profit 
from 1 < mistakes. 

"* I In- magazine business has been 
asleep," he told sponsor, "while t\ has 
been alert." In I C, foi example, top 
men were old, and getting older. "1 \ 
ecutives were talking to themselves. 
Ilje magazines lost contact with adver- 
tisers .i<»\ readers. 

"Meanwhile," he went on, "televi- 
sion u iih ii ■ j oungei and hung] iei 
men was on the prowl." 

What i- the future "I magazine ad- 
vertising in the t\ era? As one adman 
I hi it, '"I here is plent) of advertising 
to support them. Moreover, the maga- 
zines are naturals foi 1 ei tain prod- 
ucts." I hese products are: liquor 
(which air media won't take); class 
products -iirh a~ high fashion, travel, 
jewelry ; institutional and financial 



tain personal i\|»- j ■ r < <■ I 
ip 1- \t present, ih<- magazine 

tort ol "ex< lush it\ in the 
an 1 "i color. Bul 1 1 1 i — ma) I"- short- 
lived .1- telei ision moves into more 
and more ■ 0I01 programing, and 
mii iser§ ]»•. ome more interested in the 
oloi i\. 
\- f"i the kind of magazine thai 
will compete with radio and iv foi to- 
morrow's advertising dollar, GaUaghei 
foresees ih<- "specialized publication 
ili.ii will have a use value 01 appeal to 
spi 1 iIm interests. " I he masa 1 in illa- 
tion magazine," he says, "is on the 
ua\ dow n. Printed fii rion « ill I" - 
lift largel) to the pocketbooks which 
alread) have made inroad- into news- 
-land -ah-- ..i those magazines thai 
are lai gel) fi< tion. Bul f"i those 
izines thai modernize to 1 atei to 
the new public appetite foi specialized 
reading the) will bring their adver- 
tising with them. Man) are doing it 
now women's service books thai have 
broadened their scope, how-to and out- 
door magazines. \nd. of course, th< - 
phenomena] publishing success which 
thrives not onl) along with television, 
hut on television '// Guide. ^ 




Have you seen the figures behind the word for ^b^ 
Coming: February 13th at the Waldorf-Astoria, New York- 
February 15th at the Hotel Sherman, Chicago 



SPONSOR • 26 JANUARY 1957 



43 




Only market place off its kind. Gives programing profile of every 
tv and radio station in the United States and Canada. 
Published each March. Advertising forms close mid February 



H A O I O AND ULIVUION 



^ buyers' guide 

to station programing 



:: 



f'i 



If you were a timebuyer asked to make up a list of 60 farm stations 
how would you go about it 7 If i t were your job to bui Id lists of 
stations featuring farm programing, or sport shows, or negro, news 
of Latin American programing, homemaker shows or other special appeal 
programing where would you turn ? 

If you were asked to make up a list of tv stations on one day's 
notice and needed film and slide requirements of each station; if you 
had to know about likely homemaker shows, farm programs, sportscasts. 
feature film availabilities - what would you do? 

The busy timebuyer, account executive, and ad manager turn to the 
Buyers' Guide to Station Programing . It works wonders for him. It's 
the only tool enabling him to quickly, accurately and expertly sort 
out the 3,500-plus radio and tv stations of the U.S. and Canada by 
their program characteristics. 

The 1957 BUYERS' GUIDE is as basic as your rate card. It's the only 
source of its kind. Your ad in BUYERS' GUIDE, near the programing 
analysis of your own station, will benefit from a year 'round exposure 
before the largest concentration of advertiser-agency readership in 
the trade paper field. BUYERS' GUIDE goes to the full SPONSOR reader 
list of 13.500 circulation. 

Send your reservation in right away. Use the attached order form, 
or wire collect for choice position. Regular rates and frequency 
discounts apply. Advertising deadline is 15 February. Regards. 

Sincerely, 



klpert / 



Arnold Al 



BOLDFACE LISTING WITHOUT COST 




Along with your ad in the 1957 
BUYERS' GUIDE your station 
will be listed in boldface in 
the master directory. 



SPONSOR SERVICES INC 



*0 EAST 49' 



ST NEW YORK 



1957 BUYERS' GUIDE ADVERTISING ORDER FORM 



Please reserve following space in the 
1957 BUYERS' GUIDE TO STATION PROGRAMING 

□ full pagt . 



$450 



□ half page .... $265 

horizontal 7 r . ", 



□ ttvo-third pay . $330 

□ one-third pay . SI 80 

vertical .'•,/;"" deep 
■ tal (matter directory only) 



I understand my ad entitles me to boldface listing of my 
station in the master directory at no extra cost. 

NOTE TO CONTRACT ADVERTISERS mr«ct nttt 1 unci 

PALI 1 v T- 

□ I prefer placement in Master Directory 

□ I prefer placement in category list 



Firm 

City 

Name 



Zone. 



State 



< ATEGORY 
LISTINGS 



RADIO 

Chili 

Clauieal Music 

Fnrr- 

Country and 

I ' MIC 
Foreign Language 
Latin American 

Popular Mtuic 



TUEVISION 



■ on* 
I yipealt 
Sportt 




TV 



Capsule case histories of successful 
local and regional television campaigns 



GROCERY STORES 

SPONSOR: Independent Grocers Mliance 

Capsule case history: In order to promote the wide 
variety of products handled by grocery stores, this sponsor 
wanted a television campaign which would appeal to all 
segments of the tv audience. To achieve this end the In- 
dependent Grocers Alliance utilized a multi-program line- 
up on the Champaign, 111., tv station. WCIA. The organiza- 
tion has credited this program line-up with causing a 
19 1 / />'/' sales increase in its 95 outlets in the east-central 
Illinois area. Four programs of varying types were selected 
to appeal to a maximum audience. IGA reaches the night- 
time audience through two programs — Public Defender, on 
Thursdays at 9:30 p.m. and a 15-minute newscast, aired 
Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m. Happy Home, on Monday-through- 
Friday, is IGA's daytime housewives' special. Midivest 
Matinee, designed for children, has boosted sales of milk 
and ice cream. The commercials on these programs run 
the gamut from low pressure institutional plugs to strong 
promotion of IGA brands. The $60,000 tv appropriation is 
shared equally among the organization's 95 retail outlets. 

WCIA, Champaign, 111. PROGRAM: Various 



RADIO-PHONOGRAPHS 

SPONSOR: J. A. Walsh & Co. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: The appeal of a music-and-news 
video show. KTRK-TV's new program Soundtrack, was 
explored recently in a campaign run by J. A. Walsh & Co., 
Houston's RCA distributor. Applying the concepts of radio 
to television, Soundtrack enables its audience to enjoy tele- 
vision in the busy morning hours from 7:00-9:00 a.m. 
without having to sit in front of the set. As a test item, 
J. A. Walsh bought 12 one-minute announcements on 
Soundtrack during the first week in December. The com- 
mercials advertised an RCA radio-phonograph priced at 
$29.95. Since this was a test campaign, the distributor 
purposely did not inform its dealers of the commercial 
broadcasts and no other advertising was used. Dean R. 
Benton, sales manager for the RCA Victor division of J. A. 
Walsh, reported that the 12 announcements moved well 
over a hundred of the radio-phonographs in a period of 
two weeks. He went on to say that the sales were clearly 
a direct result of the spots run on Soundtrack. This $240 
campaign led the sponsor to sign for 13 additional weeks. 



KTRK-TV, Houston, Texas 



PROGRAM: Soundtrack 



CHRISTMAS TREES 



SPONSOR: Christmas Tree Land 



FOOD & GROCERY RETAILERS 



AGENCY: Direct SPONSOR: Park 'N Shop 



AGENCY: Crawford Advertising 



Capsule case history: The use of live evergreens for 
Christmas trees is a well-established tradition which must 
present formidable competition to retailers who attempt 
to sell a different type of Christmas tree. With the aid 
of television advertising, however, Chicago's Christmas 
Tree Land was highly successful in selling a tree which was 
not only different but also far more expensive. Over a 
period of two weeks, Christmas Tree Land ran commercials 
on WBKB for the Starlight Tree, a permanent metallic 
Christmas tree that revolves on a musical base. The ad- 
vertising consisted of a series of 14 one-minute live partici- 
pating announcements spread among three daily tv shows. 
The Starlight Tree retailed at $129.50 per tree and during 
the two-week advertising period 5,066 trees were sold for a 
total dollar volume of approximately $650,000. As the 
Christmas Tree Land firm had only geared its 1956 pro- 
duction for a total seasonal sale of 5,000 trees, the number 
of sales during the two-week period was a tv advertising 
coup. The cost of the 14 announcements was $2,000. 



Capsule case history: Had you spotted a pajama-clad 
citizen toting a watermelon on a Charlotte street one night 
last summer, you wouldn't have had to worry about hallu- 
cinations. Residents of the Charlotte area were induced to 
play the "pajama game*' through a novel tv offer made by 
Park 'N Shop. This sponsor began advertising on WBTV 
with The Harvesters, a 15-minute program aired at 10:00 
p.m. which features gospel singers. On the first pro- 
gram, 31 July, watermelons were offered at 10c 4 each, 
5<* if the viewer appeared in pajamas. Customers flocked 
to the Park "N Shop, thousands wearing pajamas, and 
nearly two trailer-truck loads of watermelons were sold less 
than two hours after the show went off the air. In addition, 
Gladiola Biscuits, a product new to this market, were of- 
fered at 5£ a can and 15 cases were sold less than 5 minutes 
after the show ended. The two-week period following this 
show brought a 40% sales increase and since the first show, 
the business increase averaged more than $1,000 per day 
for a five-week period. Cost for the first two weeks — $560. 



WBKB, Chicago, 111. 



PROGRAM: Announcements WBTV, Charlotte, NC 



PROGRAM: The Han esters 



46 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 



'iX 



dctSwob is Yo 



.) 



; 

w 



) 








lVlan and boy, VVTARand WTAR-TV the most valuable assets you buy when 

have been navigating the air-waves of you advertise on Tidewater Virginia's 

Tidewater Virginia since 1923, when dominant VHF Station. 

WTAR Radio went on the air. Naturally, there can never be a Television 

WTAR-TV's "Air-Date" was April Station hereabouts with the length of pn 

2nd. 1950. WTAR-TV's almost seven less EXPERIENCE that WTAR- TV 

years of telecasting experience is one of gives you. 

BASIC FACTS on WTAR-TV 

Channel 3 . . . Maximum Power . . . Maximum Tower . . . CBS Network 

Estimated Sets in area (Dec. 1, 1956) 418.016 

Population in area 1.767.900* 

.NOHOIK 

PY ^<\ Families in area 457,700* 

Effective Buying Power $2,407,998,000.00* 

('From Sales Management's Survey ol Buying Pooer. May 10. 1956) 





(Based on Measured Contour Map by Jansky & Bailey) 

5 of Virginia's Busiest Cities are 
within WTAR-TV's Grade A Signal 



\yTAH-TV 



CHANNEL 3. NORFOLK. VIRGINIA 

Business Office and Studio-720 Boush Street. Norfolk. Va . Tel MAdison 5-6711 
REPRESENTATIVE Edward Petry & Company. Inc 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 



47 



SPONSOR ASKS 



How much do you rely on motivational research 

for the content of radio and tv copy 5 




Arthur Be I Li ire, vice pres. in charge of 

tv copy, Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn, 

\ rw York 

No research of any kind can be mea- 
sured in inches or pints or pounds. 
When a copywriter creates a televi- 
sion or radio commercial, he is calling 
upon a rich mixture of facts and ex- 
perience. While motivational research 
— along with all the other kinds — has 
helped contribute to said facts and ex- 



'rich mixture 




of facts and 
experience" 



perience, it is bordering on the im- 
moral to ask him to isolate any por- 
tion of his mental process for the sake 
of laboratory analysis. 

Motivational research is relatively 
new to the advertising research picture; 
but nobody has welcomed it more than 
the copywriter. Without a doubt, as 
rapidly as it can be soundly developed 
and broadened, it will enrich more and 
more the copywriter's basic under- 
standing of the audience he is con- 
stantly in touch with. For motivational 
research, if it can be viewed as an en- 
titv for a moment, does not attempt to 
rate a commercial by score or to pro- 
mote memory games on sales points. 
It simply tries to find out more about 
why consumers act as they do. And 
anything that even tries to do that is 
doing the copywriter a service. 

To answer the question more direct- 
ly, motivational research is only begin- 



ning to make concrete contributions to 
the copywriter in the form of informa- 
tion gathered in directed depth inter- 
views, non-directed depth interviews, 
group interviews and projective tech- 
niques. 

More importantly, facts thus learned 
often make more sense when integrated 
with information from other types of 
research. It is a slow process. It can 
be an expensive process. It is a worth- 
while process. 



Alberta Hays, l > re president and ropy 

group head, food accounts. Mc(.ann-Erick- 

son, Inc., New York 

Motivational research can and does aid 
the radio or tv copywriter in two 
broad ways: ill By pointing the di- 
rection the copv appeal should take, 
and I 2 I in so doing, saving the writer 



"a woman does 
not mean what 
she thinks" 



a great deal of creative exploratory 
time: time that can be spent in con- 
centration on a given appeal. 

Illustrating this first point — that is. 
"direction of the appeal"' — it has been 
shown that in the area of "taste, a 
woman does not necessarily mean what 
she thinks she means when she says 
she does or does not like a particular 
taste. 

With Kippers, for example, women 
object because they were "too salty'" 




or "too strong." Actually, study of 
data revealed that women associated 
Kippers with "foreign dishes" and 
"smelly docks." They just did not like 
the picture that Kippers brought to 
their minds. Copywriters were di- 
rected to associate Kippers with typi- 
cal "American dishes." and the result- 
ing sales increase supported these 
findings. 

Bv narrowing the area in which a 
writers creative imagination works, 
motivational research enables him to 
spend his time thinking deeper, as it 
were, instead of wider, reducing the 
varietv of appeals he has to explore. 

Not all motivational research is 
helpful, of course. Sometimes it has 
been found that there are no "deep 
findings." Sometimes the research 
findings are too complex to be practi- 
cal for a writer. There may simply be 
too much information to fit into one 
spot radio or tv commercial. Once in 
awhile the findings are exactly oppo- 
site, too basic and abstract to be of 
a in help. 

These difficulties can be overcome 
by close cooperation between creative 
people and research people. The high- 
ly competitive nature of today's market 
demands it. 



Joe McDonough, radio-to group head, 
Cunningham & if alsh. Inc.. New York 

Norman Fronk. a man who under- 
stands motivations and still loxes them, 
once made this profound comment: 
"Motivational research is a crutch, but 
not for walking. It is for beating cli- 
ents over the head with. 

Now MR should not be belabored 



4S 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 




this way, nor used tin- v\a\. loda\ - 
motivational research has a verj defi- 
nite place. Thai place is in the back, 
not the front of a writer's mind. Ml! 
should l>f read, digested, and then for- 
gotten. It belongs in the subconscious, 
a part of a writer's intuition. Iii> per- 
ception, his empathy. \ls<>. it helps 
a\oid |iitlalls which were meant to be 
fallen into bj certain overabundant 
types we mighl classify as "head- 
beaters." 

In contrast, consider P>ill Shakes- 
peare, one of the most successful do-it- 
yourself practitioners ol motivational 
research. We could all do worse than 



"I I is HM)', 
right ... 17', 
of the time" 



to emulate his success. However, to 
do so, we must also emulate his meth- 
ods. Bill used MR to supplj the broad 
stroke-. Radio-tv writers should use 
motivational research in the same way, 
to suppl) the broad aspects of why 
people buj or to coin a well-known 
phrase, the big picture. 

After you have digested the aston- 
ishing news that women feel guilt\ 
about wasting scotch tape, or making 
instant coffee I especially when they 
feel it is inferior to percolated I ; or 
that men justify buying Cadillacs on 
the ground that they save money on 
gas — we say. "Push it in the back of 
\ our mind and let it soak in. But if 
it gets too far up front, look out ! It 
may confuse you about the real rea- 
sons people give for buying I or the 
arguments they can accept or admit 
for buying) ." 

Who, for example, would like to 
write commercials admitting that men 
hate to shave because this symbolically 
represents emasculation? A fascinat- 
ing problem. Would \ ou say, "Walk, 
don't run. and get not three but one. 
of the worlds dullest blades?" 

Yes, you can overdo a good thing, 
and "How are you fixed for blades?" 
mav not have any MR behind it. but 
it gives the motivational writer a 
pretty good run for his money. 

In conclusion, a good thing for all 
writers to remember: "Motivational 
research is 100' < right . . . 17' < of 
the time." ^ 




ONE WILL DO/ 



One station — WBNS Radio — drops sweet- 
spending Columbus and Central Ohio right 
in your lap. WBNS delivers the most listeners 
. . . twice as many as the next biggest station. 
The most and also the best. With 20 top Pulse- 
rated shows, WBNS puts push behind your 
sales program. To sell Central Ohio . . . buy 
WBNS Radio. 



CBS FOR CENTRAL OHIO 

Ask John Blair 

The number one Pulse station 
covering 1,573,820 people with 
2 Billion Dollars to spend. 



mtamfai 



radio 

COLUMBUS, OHIO 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 



49 



Radio Baltimore 

WEAP 



After only 8 weeks* is now 




in the Oct.-Dec, 1956 



HOOPER RADIO AUDIENCE INDEX 



in total rated time periods 



*On November 10, 1956, WCAO programmed 
full-time independent with the same proven 24- 
hours-a-day formula originated and used by 
WMPS, the number one station in Memphis in 
Hooper, Metro Pulse, Area Pulse, Nielsen, Hooper 
Car Radio, and Hooper Business Establishment 
surveys. 

This successful radio programming is also being 
used by Radio Boston WCOP and Radio Chicago 
WJJD with the same magnetic audience attrac- 
tion in those markets. No gimmicks, no giveaways, 
no promotions, just solid programming for solid 
listeners who reall y listen ! 



Keep your eye on these other Plough, Inc., Stations: 

Radio Memphis II Radio Boston I Radio Chicago 
WMPS WCOP WJJD 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY RADIO-TV REPRESENTATIVES. INC. 



50 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 



A weekly listing of changes 

in the advertising and broadcast fields 



NEW AND RENEW 



NEW ON TELEVISION NETWORKS 



SPONSOR 

American Home Products, NY 

Bauer & Black. Chi 

Bauer & Black, Chi 

Blue |ay, Chi 

Bon Ami, NY 

Helene Curtis, Chi 

Ford Motor, Dearborn, Mich 

Maybellinc, Chi 

Mutual of Omaha, Omaha 

Nestle, White Plains, NY 

Nestle, White Plains, NY 

Nestle, White Plains, NY 



STATIONS 



AGENCY 

Y&R, NY 
Burnett, Chi 

Burnett, Chi 

Burnett, Chi 

R&R, NY 

William H. Weiss 

JWT, Detroit 

Cordon Best, Chi CBS 165 

Bozell & Jacobs, Omaha CBS 87 

Mc-E, NY CBS 76 



Pittsburgh Plate Class, Pittsburgh 
Ralston Purina, St. Louis 
Yardley of London, NY 




Houston, NY 
Mc-E, NY 
Maxon, Detroit 
Cardner, St. Louis 
Ayer, NY 



NBC 118 
CBS 75 
CBS 77 
NBC 89 
ABC 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

Arthur Codfrey; alt W 8-8:30 pm; 9 Jan; 52 wks 
Circus Time; th 8-9 pm; 21 Feb; 1 partic per wk 
Captain Kangaroo; alt Sa 9:35-9:40 am; 2 Feb; 6 wks 
Afternoon Film Festival; 3-4:30 pm; 1 Apr; 1 partic per wk 
Circus Time; Th 8-9 pm; 24 Jan; 1 partic per wk 
Cale Storm Show; alt Sa 9-9:30 pm; 12 Jan; 19 wks 

Love Lucy; M 9-9:30 pm; 4, 18 Mar only 
Presidential Inaugural Ball, M 11:15-12 m; 21 Jan only 
Arthur Codfrey Time; Tu 10:30-10:45 am; 8 Jan; 13 wks 
Valiant Lady; alt Th 12-12:15 pm; 10 Jan; 52 wks 
Blondie; alt F 8-8:30 pm; 11 Jan-20 Sept 
Carry Moore; alt Th 10-10:15 am; 10 Jan; 52 wks 
Carry Moore; alt F 11-11:15 am; 11 (an; 13 wks 
Big Story; F 9:30-10 pm; 8 Mar-21 Feb, 1958 
Famous Film Festival; Sa. 7:30-9 pm; 23 Feb; 1 partic per wk 



RENEWED ON TELEVISION NETWORKS 

SPONSOR AGENCY STATIONS 



American Tobacco, NY SSC&B, NY 

Mercury Division — Ford, Dearborn, Mich K&E, NY _ 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



NBC 89 Big Story; F 9:30-10 pm; 1 Mar-14 Feb, 1958 

CBS 198 Ed Sullivan; Su 8-9 pm; 30 Dec, 1956; 52 wks 



BROADCAST INDUSTRY EXECUTIVES 



NAME 

Charles R. Abry 

Cene Autry 

Tom Chauncey _ 
John Cooley 
Robert E. Davis 

Leon Dolnick 

Ted Dorf _ 

Bob Flanigan 

Byron E. French 

Alan Ciellerup 

Howard Hammond 

Stuart Hepburn _ 

Henry Hickman 

Joseph F. Hladky 

George Inghram 

Lew Jeffrey 

John J. Kelly 

Robert S. Kieve 

Jody Klahre 

Jackson Launer 

Al LeVine 

Nat Liebeskind 

Cregg Lincoln 

James V. Malloy 

Joe Miller 
Robert M. Ryan 

James Schroeder 

Adolph L. Seton 

Wendall Siler 

Crace M. Spanihel 

Don Stewart 

Val Thomas _. 

Lawrence Turet 

Cuy Vaughan 

Sam Whitacre 
Norman W. Williams 
Eugene C. Wyatt 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



ABC-TV, NY. nat sis mgr NBC-TV, NY, eastern sis mgr 

KOOL, KOOL-TV, Phoenix, Ariz, pres _ Same, chairman board 

KOOL, KOOL-TV, Phoenix, Ariz, exec vp & gen mgr Same, pres & gen mgr 

WCAY, Silver Spring, Md, news staff Same, dir promotion-public relations 



KVAN-AM, Vancouver, Wash, sis mgr 
WITI-TV, Milwaukee, Wis, promotion dir 
WCAY, Silver Spring, Md 
WOV, NY, asst to gen mgr 



Ottaway Newspapers-Radio Inc. Endicott, NY, exec vp 

Printers Ink, media rep _. 

KIMA-AM, Yakima, Wash, radio eng 

WCAY, Silver Spring, Md, commercial mgr 

WFBR, Baltimore, asst program dir _ _ 

Cazette Co, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, vp & sec 

WISN-TV, Milwaukee, acct exec _ 

KMTV, Omaha, production mgr 

Collier's Magazine, NY, advtng sis 

.U.S. Information Agency, Washing, DC, special assistant 
to deputy dir 



KIMA-AM, Yakima, Wash, sis mgr 
Same, acct exec 
-Same, commercial mgr 
Storer Broadcasting, NY, sis 
Same, chairman board 
RCA Recorded Program Services, NY, sis rep — southwest 

territory 
KBAS-TV, Ephrata, Wash, chief eng 
KNOX, Fort Worth, vp & gen mgr 
Same, operations mgr 
Same, pres & gen mgr 
WISN, Milwaukee, radio sis mgr 
Same, program mgr 
ABC Tv Net, NY, acct exec 
WBBF, Rochester, NY, vp & gen mgr 



WCPO-TV, Cin, producer 

Sportlite, Inc, Chi, head 

Times Television, NY, gen mgr 

Crosley Broadcasting, NY, sis 

Bill Sturm Studio, NY 

KFMB. San Diego, local sis mgr 
KING-TV. Seattle, news editor ... 
KSEM-AM, Moses Lake, Wash, mgr 

ABC. NY, asst dir press information 

WRAD, Radford, Va, gen mgr 



..KGW-TV, Portland, Ore. asst to promotion mgr 

WLW-C, Columbus, Ohio, production mgr 

_.Same, also Kling Film, Chi, dir — syndicated film div 

Sterling Television, NY, member board 

WLW-C, Columbus, Ohio, sis mgr 
. ...WJAR-TV, Providence, Rl, acct exec 
Same, gen sis mgr 

KOMO-TV, Seattle, sis promotion mgr 

KBAS-TV, Ephrata, Wash, sis mgr 

Same, mgr on-the-air-promotion 

WDBJ-TV, Roanoke, Va, acct exec 

KTHT, Houston, asst to mgr 



FC&B, Houston, r-tv timebuyer 

KRAM, Las Vegas, gen sis mgr KSDO, San Diego, acct exec 

.WGAY, Silver Spring, Md, dir promotion-public relations Same, sis 

Weir Associates, NY & Miami, producer-director WITI-TV, Milwaukee, Wis, promotion dir 

Charlotte Observer, Charlotte, NC, feature advtng mgr James S. Ayers Co, Charlotte, NC, office mgr 

Republican State Central Committee, Wash, publicity dir KOMO-TV, Seattle, acct exec 

KMTV, Omaha, dir , Same, production mgr 

Midsate. Inc, Dickson, Tenn, pres ABC Tv Net, NY, nat program sis mgr 



ADVERTISING AGENCY PERSONNEL CHANGES 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



William A. Bates 
Mortimer Berkowitz, Jr 

Hazel N. Bey 

Ernie Brant . 

Jack M. Bristow 

Al Camhi 

Brooke Carroll 

Daniel J. Connolly 

Edward J. Corbett 

Scott Costello 

Thomas R. Cox 

Chester F. Craft 

Charles V. Davis 

John Doherty 

Irvin S. Dolk 



BBDO. NY. specialist — automotive products 

BBDO, NY, acct exec 

Same, office mgr 

Carroll Advtng, San Antonio, acct exec, mktng dir 

Same, office mgr 



Congoleum Nairn, Kearny, NJ, dir sis training 

Woman's Home Companion, NY, ad mgr 

Robert S. Risman, Buffalo 

Thomas F. Conroy, San Antonio 

...BBDO, Cleve, acct super 

- Sears Roebuck. NY. Chi, mail order copywriter, sis mgr Lloyd S. Howard. NY, gen mgr, asst to pres 

Thomas F. Conroy. San Antonio Carroll Advtng, San Antonio, pres, gen mgr 

Lewin, Williams & Saylor, NY, sec & asst treas _ _ Same, treas 

Ceyer, Detroit, vp Same, also creative dir 

Chirurg Co, Boston, acct exec Same, vp, gen mgr 

_ Y&R. NY, acct exec . Same, vp 

McCarty Co, Chi, gen mgr __ Zimmer, Keller & Calvert. Detroit, creative staff 

Barnes Chase. LA. office mgr Hixson & Jorgensen. LA. food & package goods acct group 

Ted Bates, NY, acct exec Same, also asst vp 

Lamport, Fox, Prell & Dolk, South Bend, Ind, sec-treas Same, vp 

Lawrence D. Dunham DFS, SF, acct exec Same, also vp 

Ken R. Dyke Y&R, NY, vp Same, vp-lnternational div 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 



51 




NEW AND RENEW 



ADVERTISING AGENCY PERSONNEL CHANGES 



continued 



Beaven Ennis 
Elinor Fahrenholz 
R. Allen Gardner 

David | Gillespie 
Estellc Cindorf 
Sylvia Granick 
Carl Cylfe 
Lewis H Happ 
William R. Hesse 

Judson H. Irish 

David Kaiglcr . 
Wray D. Kennedy 
Winston W. Kirchert 
Irving Smith Kogan 
Thomas W. Lapham 
John R. Markey . 
Ted Menderson 
Dwayne L. Moore 
Roger Moore 
Douglas I Murphey 
Leonard Newsteder 
Thomas M. Oddy 
Betty O'Hara 
Jackson L. Parker 



William Patten 
Richard Penn 
Walter T. Pollock 
Carl F. Prell 
Phi His Ro.uk 
Robert Rothschild 
E. Lowell Sanders 
Thomas R. Santacroce 

Charles W. Schiess 

Alan Sidnam 

Howard Stapf 

Torrey Stearns 

Richard H. Stinnette 
Locke W. Turner 
Edgar B. Van Winkle _ 
William F. Vinicombe 
Sidney Matthew Weiss 
Hillard W. Welch 



Compton, NY, media dept Same, asst acct exec 

.._ Cunningham & Walsh, Chi, writer-producer Same, r-tv dir 

Monsanto Chemical Co, St. Louis, asst dir advtng-consumer 

products div Y&R, NY, acct exec 

K&E, Detroit, vp Same, office mgr & a director 

Thomas F. Conroy. San Antonio Carroll Advtng, San Antonio, media dir 

Rowc & Wyman, Cin Ted Menderson Co, Cin, media dir 

Leo Burnett, Chi Cunningham & Walsh. Chi. media dir 

— Ccyer. NY. senior space buyer Same, media dir 

B&B. NY, vp, acct super Same, senior vp 

Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, NY, vp & copy chief Same, senior vp. member exec committee 

WPFH, Wilmington, Del, gen mgr W. S. Roberts. Phila, vp, acct exec 

Lcwin. Williams & Saylor, NY, vp Same, sec & member bd 

Ted Bates, NY, media group super Same, also asst vp 

.), M. Hickerson, NY, public relations dir Hicks & Creist. NY, public relations dir 

Y&R. NY. asso copy super Same, vp & asst to pres 

Barnes Chase, SF, mgr & new bus dir Hixson & Jorgensen, LA, food & package goods acct group 

Rowe & Wyman, Cin, vp Ted Menderson Co, Cin, pres 

Ted Bates, NY, acct exec Same, also vp 

- _.WLW-T, Cin Ted Menderson Co. Cin, acct exec 

Y&R. NY. acct exec Same, vp 

Lewin, Williams & Saylor, Newark, N), vp & gen mgr Same, also member bd 

Beauty Counselors of Canada. Ltd. office mgr K&E. Montreal, office mgr 

DFS, HY, copy dept Same, also vp 

International Packings Corp, Bristol. NH. ad mgr & public 

relations dir . — ____ Chirurg Co, Boston, media dir 

DFS, SF, acct exec Same, also vp 

Zerbe-Penn, Puerto Rico Y&R, NY, NY mgr-lnternational div 

Lewin, Williams & Saylor, NY, senior vp Same, exec vp 

Lamport, Fox, Prell & Dolk, South Bend, Ind, vp Same, pres 

Mayor JoseDh Mills, Warick, Rl, exec sec Bo Bernstein, Providence, Rl, nat-regional r-tv timebuyer 

Shivell Hall, NY, acct exec Mahoney & Howard, NY, vp & acct super 

Manhattan Soap Co, NY, dir sis & merch _ BBDO. NY, specialist — drug mktng 

Ruppert Brewery, NY, vd & gen sis mgr Compton, SF, vp chg west coast operations 

St. Georges & Keyes, NY, asst treasurer Same, treasurer 

B&B, NY, vp Same, exec vp 

Lewin, Williams & Saylor. NY, personnel & traffic mgr Paris & Peart, NY, mgr traffic dept 

....St. Ceorges & Keyes, NY, public relations dir Same, vp chg public relations & publicity 

California Fashions Pub. NY, eastern ad mgr Mahoney & Howard, NY, vp chg merch & promotion 

BBDO, LA, media dir __ Same, admin acct exec 

Y&R, NY, acct exec __ Same, vp 

...C & C Super Corp. advtng mgr _ .Weiss & Celler. NY. acct exec 

Lewin, Williams & Saylor, NY, exec vp & treas Same, pres 

Chirurg Co, Boston, acct exec & chairman industrial plans bd Same, super technical accts 






SPONSOR PERSONNEL CHANGES 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



John L. Burns 



Booz. Allen & Hamilton, senior partner & vice-chairman 

exec committee - - 

Harry H. Caswell W. F. Young, Inc. gen mgr & treasurer ..._ 

Earl A. Clason Pillsbury Mills, mgr grocery products div 

Frank M. Folsom RCA, pres .... 

Alfred M. Cottscho Ceneral Cigar Co, lab research 

Russell Holm — 

Charles H. Kitchell Lever Brothers, copy dept „ 

David C. Krimendahl Stokely-Van Camp, dist sis mgr — east central region 

W. F. McMahon _ ; Thomas |. Lipton, asst gen sis mgr ..... 

E. L. McMenamy Thomas j. Lipton, gen field super 

S. M. Medaris Stokely-Van Camp, sis mgr — east central region _ 

0. ). Nickel Thomas |. Lipton, asst advtng dir 

Robert J. Piggott Ralston Purina Co, advtng & sis promo mgr — Ralston div. 

William H. Rehm Stokely-Van Camp, asst advtng mgr 

Ralph M. Watts ..Stokely-Van Camp, merch mgr 

Elmer L. Weber Durkee Famous Foods, gen sis mgr — packaged products div 

jack P. White WJR, Detroit, news editor 

Wilbur F. Young III W. F. Young, Inc. asst gen mgr ._ 



NEW AFFILIATION 



RCA, pres 

Same, chairman board 

Same, also vp 

Same, chairman exec committee board 

Same, asst dir devel 

Stokely-Van Camp, market research mgr 

Same, mgr copy dept-promotion services div 

Same, sis mgr-east central region 

Same, gen sis mgr 

Same, asst gen sis mgr 

Same, sis mgr — private label & institutional dept 

Same, gen advtng mgr 

Pet Milk Co, advtng mgr 

Same, advtng mgr 

Same, advtng & merch mgr 

Miami Margarine Co. dir sis & advtng 

Oldsmobile Division, dir public relations 

Same, gen mgr & treasurer 



NEW FIRMS, NEW OFFICES (Change of address) 

The Advertiser Service Dept of ARB, NY, has new headquarters at 341 

Madison Ave 
Benton & Bowles, NY, will move to 666 Fifth Ave in November, 1957 
Carroll Advertising, Inc., San Antonio, Texas, is new agency with offices 

in the Insurance Bldg 
Cary-Hill Inc., Kansas City, Mo. is now located at 316 VFW Bldg 
Hcadley-Reed. Atlanta, has moved to 800 Peachtree St Bldg, Suite 673 



Don Kemper Co.. Inc.. Dayton. Ohio, now has a NY office in the Empire 
State Bldg, 57th floor 

The Liftman Co. NY, new advertising, merchandising & public relations 
organization, has opened offices at 18 W 56th St 

Ted Menderson, Cm, new advertising & public relations agency, has of- 
fices in the Rookwood Bldg. 1077 Celestial St 

Adam Young Inc., NY. is now located at 3 E 54th St 

Young Television Corp, NY, is now located at 3 E 54th St 



STATION CHANGES 



KAIM, Honolulu, is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broadcasting System 
KBAK-TV, Bakersfield, Cal, has joined the CBS Television Pacific Net 
KBAS-TV, Ephrata. Wash, will go on the air approximately 1 Feb 
KDAY, Santa Monica. Cal, has appointed )ohn E. Pearson Co reps for 

Pacific Northwest area & Dallas 
KERO-TV, Bakersfield. Cal, has been bought by Wrather-Alvarez Broad- 
casting. Inc pending FCC approval 
KCEN Tulare County. Cal, is new radio station serving Tulare, Kings, 

Fresno & Kern counties 
KLLA, Leesville. La, is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broadcasting 

System 
KMRS, Morris, Minn, is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broadcasting 

System 
KOB. KOB-TV, Albuquerque, NM, have been bought by KSTP, Inc, 

Minncapolis-St. Paul, pending FCC approval 
KRSN, Los Alamos, NM, is now an affiliate of ABC Radio Net 
KUEN, Wenatchee, Wash, is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broad- 
casting System 
KWBU, Corpus Christi, Texas, has changed its call letters to KATR 
WBLR, Batcsburg. SC, is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broadcasting 
System 



WCOV radio, Montgomery, has appointed Adam Young. Inc natl reps, 
effective 1 Feb 

WCOV-TV. Montgomery, has appointed Young Television natl reps, 
effective 1 Feb 

WCYN, Cynthiana, Ky. is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broadcasting 
System 

WFBM-AM-TV. Indianapolis, has been purchased by Time Inc, pending 
FCC approval 

WIBX, Utica, NY, has appointed Meeker Co natl reps, effective 1 Feb 

WIN-T, Waterloo. Ind. is now officially designated as a Fort Wayne 
station 

WKNB-TV. West Hartford, Conn, has changed its call letters to WNBC 

WOOD-AM-TV, Crand Rapids, has been purchased by Time Inc, pending 
FCC approval 

WSKI, Montpelier, Vt, is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broadcasting 
System 

WTCN-AM-TV, Minneapolis, has been purchased by Time Inc. pending 
FCC approval 

vVWVR. Terre Haute, Ind, is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broad- 
casting System 

WWXL, Manchester, Ky. is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broad- 
casting System 






SPONSOR 



2(> .1 \M AHY 19"), 



$ $ $ 

* $ $ 

$ $ 



$ 



$ 



$ 



$ 



$ $ 



$ 



$ 



$ 



$ $ 

$ $ 

$ $ $ 



HOW MUCH 



SHOULD A STATION INVEST 
IN TRADE PAPER ADVERTISING? 



Station managers tell u< that they seldom get a straight 
answer to this oft-asked question. 

Yet todays strict insistence on economy in every phase 
of station operation demands that the question be 
answered. 

Here is what we say when someone asks, "Mow much 
should mv tv I or radio) station put into trade paper 
advertising? 1 ' 

For three out of four stations the answer i-. "not a 
red cent." 

When yon advertise in a t\ radio trade publication, 
yon want to attract national business. You're pin- 
pointing your message to account executives, ad man- 
agers, timebuyers. And you must have the ingredients 
that help you and your rep convert favorable impres- 
sions into sales. 



promotion dollars for local use u 1 1 1 «- - - sou have — 
I 1 ) A national representative who will he stimu- 
lated and helped by your trade publication adver- 
tising. (2) A market story strong enough to con- 
vince national and regional buyers that your station 
is logical. (3) A station story that warrants con- 
sideration. 

Frequency, network, and power aren't the whole an- 
swer, though they help. A few 250- watt independents 
have invested as much as 50% of their national spol 
income in trade advertising and have achieved out- 
standing result-. 

As we mentioned earlier, three out of four stations 
have no business using national trade paper -pace 
If you're the one-out-of-four that should. SPONSOR 
recommends, on the basis of industry analysis, thai 
you invest 5% of your 1957 national spot income in 



With few exception-, we advise that you reserve your thi> pin-pointed form of advertising. 



ON YOUR 

DESK 

EVERY 

FRIDAY 



THE WEEKLY 



IAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



d 



in New York, Dallas, Denver— and points west! 



WANT PRIME TIME from coast to coast? 
With film, it's easy! Scheduling is a breeze. 
No star worries— no dangers of "slips" or 
fluffs, either. What's more, you can rehearse 



to your heart's content, film your show, 
edit and pre-test for maximum effective- 
ness. Yes, you make time and save money 
. . . when you USE EASTMAN FILM. 



For complete information write to Motion Picture Film Department 
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, Rochester 4, N. Y. 



East Coast Division 

342 Madison Ave. 

New York 17, N. Y. 



Midwest Division 

1 30 East Randolph Drive 

Chicago 1 , III. 



West Coast Division 

6706 Santa Monica Blvd. 

Hollywood 38, Calif. 



or W. J. GERMAN, Inc. 

Agents for the sale and distribution of Eastman Professional 
Motion Picture Films, Fort Lee, N. J.; Chicago, III.; Hollywood, Calif- 



Shoot it IN COLOR . . . You'll be glad you did! 



Er 



National and regional spot buys 
in work now or recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

Corn Products Refining Co., New "> <>rk City, is launching a 13- 
week (est in Peoria and Kansas City through ('.. L. Miller agency, 
same city. Product is Karo Frosting Mix, which was test marketed 
with tv in the same cities under another name and is now returning 
with a schedule of eight announcements weekly. li\e and filmed 
minutes. Bu\er: Francis Delaney. 

Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick, N. J., will shortly supplement 
its network tv with a schedule of one-minute participations in a 
group of selected major market areas for one of its newer surgical 
dressing items. Agency: Young & Rubicam. New York Cit\. Buy- 
er: Kirk Greiner. 

Revlon, New York City, for its new Baby Silicare Powder, returns 
to the same 10 test markets it used for Baby Silicare Lotion next 
week for a 13-week campaign of nighttime minutes. Agency: Dowd, 
Redfield & Johnstone, New York. Buyer: Carol Diem. 

The Bon Ami Co., New York City, through Ruthrauff & R\an. 
same city, is going into at least 30 tv markets to advertise its Jet 
Spray Bon Ami. Schedule will embrace both daytime and night- 
time, and minutes, 20's and 10's will be used. The commercials will 
be live and on film. Bu\ing is half completed. Buver: Marx 
Dowling. 

Stephen F. Whitman & Son, Inc., Philadelphia, has bought night- 
time tv during prime hours for approximately two weeks prior to St. 
Valentine's Day for its Whitmans Chocolate. Sixty markets will be 
used for the IDs, with an average of four per market the first week 
and six to eight per market the Monday, Tuesdav and Wednesday 
before 14 February in the second week. Buying has been com- 
pleted. Buyer: Jeanne Nolan. Agency: N. \^ . Aver. New York City. 



Fabron, Inc., New \ork City, is adding announcements in a few 
markets after a successful six-week tv test for its new Tipette nail 
polish during the pre-Christmas period. New agency is Hoffman- 
Manning, same city. Pattern: Minutes and 30"s, primarily during 
the week and in daytime slots. Frequent) : Six to 10 per market 
weekly. Buver: E. Dale. 



' I 1 



RADIO BUYS 

Lever Bros., New York City, for its Silver Dust Blue, begin- a 
schedule in 80 markets 11 Februar\ with a pattern of four "flights 
totaling 24 to 26 weeks on the air throughout the year. SSC&B, 
\ew York City, is buying packages ranging from seven to 20 an- 



Spot buys continued. 



JOE 

FLOYD 

SAYS 

DRAW 
YOUR 
OWN 




18 



17 



16- 



•15 



14- 



13 



CONCLUSION 




12* 



10* 



2. 

KELO'S new 1,032-ft. tower 
gives one-station coverage 
of a whole vast regional 
market — plus the added 
impact of a Floyd-operated 
station! KELO rates fit this 

multi-market into any 
campaign budget! 




SIOUX FALLS, S. D. 

One of the Midwest's Leading Radio 
Stations Affiliated with NBC 

JOE FLOYD, President 
Represented by H-R 



56 



nouncements weekly to reach women during the daytime hours every 
day of the week. This is the product's biggest spot radio push thus 
far. Buyer: Ira Gonsier. 

Ceneral Motors Acceptance Corporation, New York City, is 
another example of an advertiser in 1957 formulating strategy and 
selecting stations months in advance. GMAC is currently con- 
sidering availabilities for late spring and summer in over 200 
markets where the company has branch offices. Final decisions on 
buying will be made in the middle of March. The pattern will be 
similar to its successful campaign in past years: one station in each 
market broadcasting one minute live public service announcements 
for the motorist. In line with this, man) stations will have private 
lines to police patrols in key areas. An average of 20 bulletins will 
be flashed each weekend, during heaviest traffic hours. Basic themes 
for the motorist are safe driving, car care and traffic information. 
Only 20 seconds will advertise GMAC. The company has found 
that this type of announcement produces best results for its dealers 
because it concentrates on listeners while they are driving and gives 
them the information they need to hear. Buver: Rena Mever. 
Agency: Campbell-Ewald. New York City. 

U. S. Tobacco Co., New York City, for its Bruton Snuff, is adding 
seven markets to its current radio lineup of 45 for an earlv Februan 
start. Pattern: "quickies"' at the average saturation rate of 40 
weekly for a full year. Agency: C. J. LaRoche. same city. Buyer: 
Doris Gould. 

RADIO & TV BUYS 

Boyle- Midway, New York City, for its Aeroshave. is placing sched- 
ules in a limited number of markets to supplement its coverage from 
five network shows. Tv pattern: prime times. Radio: early morn- 
ing and evening sports show adjacencies. February kickoff will 
continue throughout the vear. Agency: Geyer, same city. Buyer: 
Ed Richardson. 

Corn Products Refining Co., New York City, for its Nu-Soft fab- 
ric softener, starts an 11-week drive next week in scattered areas. 18 
tv and two radio markets. Aim: to reach women during the daytime 
hours and promote Nu-Soft for towels and children's apparel. Spot 
schedule will be a sustaining effort until the client decides future 
plans. Product now has limited distribution, but may go national. 
Agenc\ : Mc Cann-Erickson. New York. Buyer: Jay Schoenfeld. 

National Board of Fire Underwriters, New York City, is buying 
20-second announcements for a 13-week drive which starts 4 March. 
In radio, 115 cities with an average frequency of 15 weekl) : in tv. 
the top 10 markets with three commercials per week. Copy is 
aimed at both men and women, and promotes several types of house- 
hold insurance in behalf of the Board's 220 member capital stock 
companies and their agents. Buying is incomplete. Agency: J. M. 
Mathes. New York. Buver: Edna Cathcart. 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 



PCMNSVll/AMiAS 3rd TV MA0&T 



on 



WJAC-TV 

delivers it 
to you! 




In 20 counties out of this 41-county coverage 
WJAC-TV serves 80 to 100% of TV homes! 



With over a million TV homes in its coverage area, WJAC-TV has a solid claim 
on Pennsylvania's 3rd TV Market — and up-to-the-minute NCS figures point 
up what tremendous appeal WJAC-TV has for this responsive market. It 
reaches into 63% of the TV homes in this rich and prosperous area — and 
over half a million viewer homes follow WJAC-TV three or more days a week. 
That's a mighty potent punch to put behind your product — a selling force you 
need if you really want Southwestern Pennsylvania. 



JOHNSTOWN- ALT00NA TV AUDIENCE 

(Cambria and Blair Counties) 

The latest A.R.B. study (Nov., 1956) shows . . . out of 
112 quarter-hour rating periods from 7:00 to 11:00 P. M. . . . 

WJAC-TV leads in 105 periods 
Station B leads in 7 periods 



Of the top 25 night time shows 
... 1 on Station B! 



24 are on WJAC-TV 



SERVING MILLIONS FROM 

TOPTHEALLEGHENIES 




WANTED 



Are You the Sales Manager 
SPONSOR Needs in the 
Midwest? 



SPONSOR is looking for a Sales 
Manager in the Midwest with a 
strong sales record. This is a key 
sales area, with headquarters in 
Chicago, and requires a top- 
notch man who is looking for an 
exceptional opportunity and is 
willing to work for it. You'll be 
calling on top station executives 
in 10 states. There's plenty of 
prestige, sales advantages, and 
interesting activity to this assign- 
ment — plenty of travel, too. If 
you're the man. you'll have a 
proven sales record, some knowl- 
edge of station operation, a repu- 
tation for square dealing, and a 
deep down desire to improve 
your financial position. Please 
rush full details. 

BOX 261 

SPONSOR, 40 E. 49 

NEW YORK 17 



58 




News and Idea 

WRAP-UP 






ADVERTISERS 

Members of the Eastern division 
of the Association of National Ad- 
vertisers will scan the current tv 
and radio picture in a one-day 
tv-radio workshop at the Plaza 
Hotel, New York, 14 February. 

The tour of the two media will be 
guided by six specialists from the 
agency field. 

The guides and their subjects: 

Sherwood Dodge, of FCB: Pre- 
testing the tv commercial. 
Mary McKenna, of WNEW, N. Y.: 
Is Radio Still a Good Buy? 

Bob Foreman, of BBDO: Compar- 
ing the Cost and Effectiveness of Film 
vs. Live Commercials. 

Sam Thurm, Lever Bros, media: 
Case History of Our Own Experience 
with Color Tv. 

Linnea Nelson: When Spots Be- 
come Available, Who Gets Them? 

C. Terence Clyne, McCann-Erick- 
son: Are Costs of Tv Network Pro- 
grams Coming Down? 

General Foods has caught up with 
the trend toward elevating the 
marketing director's role to top 
management level. 

Robert H. Bennett has been named 
head of marketing for the corporation. 
He also becomes a member of the com- 
pany president's council. 

Under his newly assigned authority, 
Bennett will have reporting to him the 
vice-presidents in charge of sales and 
consumer relations and advertising. 
That included Edwin W. Ebel, who 
has the title of v.p., advertising and 
consumer relations. 

Bennett moves up from general man- 
ager of the Jell-0 Division. He's been 



a corporate v.p. since 



1952. 



Helene Curtis has thought up a 
new method of getting extra mile- 
age out of a star-name. 

Ray Bolger, star of the Curtis- spon- 
sored Washington Square show on 
Sunday afternoons on NBC-TV, is 
offering viewers his personal check for 



5(!c for trying the sponsor's Spray Net. 
Curtis is also set to introduce a new 
cream deodorant plus a new formula 
for Stopette Spra\ . 

U. S. Steel will start its third annual 
Kitchen Call promotion of steel kitch- 
en cabinets and built-ins on 8 May . . . 
Ralston Purina will use spot tv and 
radio as well as .\BC-T\ "s Big Story 
show to introduce its new Purina Dog 
Chow starting 1 March . . . Interna- 
tional Shoe's Poll Parrot brand is 
looking for spot availabilities for tv. 
Schedule will start in the middle of 
March in 110 markets. 

Promotion idea used by Falstaff 
Brewing in connection with its State 
Trooper tv film series — the beer com- 
pany named all its employees honorary 
state troopers and sent them personal- 
ized certificates . . . P&G's Gleem 
Toothpaste is offering a consumer 
premium to promote its ABC-TV 
series, The Life and Legend of 
Wyatt Earp. It's a kit of the Bunt- 
line Special (long-barrelled revolver) 
used prominently on the show. Premi- 
um is available for both flaps from the 
Gleem carton, plus 50^ . . . Johnson 
& Johnson will use its tv shows to 
promote a national scholarship contest 
for youngsters 17 and under. Insur- 
ance policies for their education will 
be awarded to 49 winners, amount of 
total award is 875,000. 

AGENCIES 

J. Walter Thompson is audition- 
ing a half-hour tv show starring 
Gordon McRae for a house ac- 
count. 

If the client l>u\s the show, JWT 
will have a total of three and a half 
hours of house-produced shows weekly. 

Other shows it produces are Lux 
Theatre. Medical Horizons (Ciba), 
Kraft Theatre and the Ernie Foul 
Show (night-time l . 

Here's another merger: Charles L. 
Kumrill Co., Rochester, N. Y., has 
bought Baldwin. Bowers & Strachan, 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 



l!iilT;ilo. The purchase will bring in 
;m additional $3 million-plus in gross 
billings to Rumrill. 

Baldwin, Bowers & Strachan will 
keep its corporate entftj and company 
name and will function as a division 
of Rumrill. 



New agency appointments: Cun- 
ningham & Walsh will handle all ad- 
vertising for Colgate's lirisk Tooth- 
paste with hillings of about S3 million 
... J. A. Wright & Co. has appointed 
Charles W. Hoyt Co. to handle adver- 
tising for its Silver Cream effective 1 
February. 

The U. S. Army Recruiting Ser- 
vice ad contract is open for bids. 
Award will be made 1 July. DFS has 
held the contract since October 1952 
. . . Harold Ober Associates, liter- 
ary agency, has announced the ap- 
pointment of Mr. and Mrs. Milton E. 
Krents to act as exclusive radio-tv 
agents for their clients. 

NETWORKS 

Zig-zagging of program sponsor- 
ships at the tv networks continues. 

At CBS-TV Ceneral Electric is mov- 
ing out and Revlon is moving in as 
sponsor of the Ticentieth Century Fox 
Hour seen alternate Wednesdays from 
10 to 11 p.m. Starting date looks like 
6 February. General Mills is bowing 
out of The Giant Step at the end of 
February. P&G reported wanting out 
of Her Jeannie and definitely out of 
The Brothers in March. 

At NBC-TV — Quaker Oats is seeking 
relief on Caesar's Hour and wants to 
cut back to alternate weeks. Purex and 
Seidel reported preparing to drop the 
Big Surprise in the Spring. General 
Foods reported readv to drop Hiram 
Holiday and looking for an alternate 
week berth elsewhere on the network. 



Latest network tv buys: 

• ABC-TV— Philip Morris will 
sponsor the Mike Wallace interview 
show debuting 28 April. Sunday 10- 
10:30 p.m. Agency is N. W. Aver. 

• CBS-TV — Johnson & Johnson has 
bought alternate weeks of the Heckle 
and Jeckle Shoiv (Sundav 1-1:30 p.m.) 
To sell Band-Aid Stars 'n Strips to 
kids. 

Walt Disney and ABC have just 
signed a $9 million pact covering 



TWHICH^M 


^TV STATION^ 


^DOMINATES 


^ SOPiTu a 


^^ ^^ ^^^ r 




THE ^^ ■ \ 
SOUTH BEND^^H ^^ 


cfcf ■"* -^1 


fcnr 


^^^^T ARB 


ELKHART ^^ 
TELEVISION ^^ 


y 


^^ RATINGS 


AUDIENCE ^V 


• 


^NOV.15-NOV.21 


RANK 


PROGRAM 


WSBT-TV 


STATION "A" 


STATION "B" 


1. 


What's My Line? 


51.5 






2. 


1 Love Lucy 


49.3 






3. 


Ed Sullivan Show 


47.2 






4. 


NCAA-N. D. Football 




44.5 




5. 


I've Got A Secret 


44.3 






6. 


Red Skelton Show 


41.2 






7. 


Climax 


39.5 






8. 


$64,000 Question 


39.4 






9. 


Jack Benny 


37.7 






10. 


Your Hit Parade 




36.5 




11. 


Perry Como Show 




36.1 




12. 


The Millionaire 


35.5 






13. 


Playhouse 90 


35.1 






14. 


Lassie 


34.5 






15. 


The Line-Up 


34.5 






16. 


Jackie Gleason Show 


34.4 






17. 


December Bride 


34.3 






18. 


Robin Hood 


34.0 






19. 


Alfred Hitchcock Presents 33.3 






20. 


Gunsmoke 


33.0 






21. 


Chevy Show— Bob Hope 




32.9 




22. 


U. S. Steel Hour 


32.8 






23. 


People Are Funny 




31.5 




24. 


Loretta Young Show 




31.5 




25. 


$64,000 Challenge 


31.3 








41 OF THE 50 TOP-RATED SHOWS ARE 
CARRIED BY WSBT-TV! 

There's no doubt about it— WSBT-TV dominates the South 
Bend television picture. One audience study after another 
proves this. You just don't cover South Bend unless you use 
WSBT-TV! Write for detailed market data. 

PAUL H. RAYMER CO., INC.. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



WSBT 



TV 




CBS... A CBS BASIC 

OPTIONAL STATION 



SOUTH 


BEND, 


IND. 


CHANNEL 


34 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 



59 



tv programing for the '."ST-'oS 
season. 

Here arc the highlights ol the deal: 

• \ new non-cartoon, hall-hour 
series titled Zorro. The adventure 
series is slated for nighttime showing 
and i> hased mi Johnston McCulley's 
masked hero of earl) California days. 

• Twenty-six new Disneyland shows. 

• 65 hours of new material for 
Mickey Mouse (Jul) which will be 
i nt to a half-hour daily. 



NBC's education television project 
>vill he carried by all 25 of the 
non-commercial educational tv 
stations throughout the country. 

The five educational programs will 
he fed live from New York on week- 
days from 6:30 to 7 p.m. Starting date 
is tentatively set for 11 March. 

Local loops to connect the education- 
al stations with NBC lines will he sup- 
plied hy the Educational Television 
and Radio Center at Ann Arbor. 



North American Philips Co. has 
signed to sponsor a five minute Mon- 
day-Wednesday-Friday sports show on 
CBS Radio starting 18 March in behalf 
of Norelco Electric Shavers . . . NBC- 
TV used Ampex magnetic video tape 
to record the President's oath-taking 
ceremony during the Inauguration 
broadcasts. 



ASSOCIATIONS 

Another step ahead in film quality 
improvement was made by the film 
committee of NARTB which just ap- 
proved the development of a station 
manual giving information on opera- 
tional techniques, equipment mainte- 
nance practices and performance cri- 
teria . . . League of Advertising 
Agencies has established its First 
Annual "Outstanding Advertising" 
Awards and is currently accepting en- 
tries. Awards are limited to League 
members and will be in five categories 
including tv and radio campaigns. 



Is the tv pitchman vanishing? 

G. Richard Shafto, chairman of the 
N \liBT Code Review Board, says they 
are. He notes the Board's monitoring 



reports show a steady decline in the 
pitch and also in program-length com- 
mercials. 

Shafto also reports that the Board 
has received over 1.700 letters of com- 
plaint about advertising from viewers, 
and that each complaint giving neces- 
sar\ details was checked out. 



In a 1 0-year report of its stew- 
ardship, the Four A"s committee 
on Interchange of Opinion on 
Objectionable Advertising high- 
lighted these facts: 

• About 1.800 complaints involv- 
ing 395 agencies had been reported. 

• Of the 1,600 classifiable com- 
p'aints 371 were on drug and phar- 
maceutical ads; 130 on clothing; 128 
on appliances; 123 foods; 106 tobac- 
co, etc. 

• Third of the complaints con- 
cerned misleading ads; one-fourth, sug- 
gestive copy and the rest of a miscel- 
laneous nature. 

• Two-thirds of the complaints were 
directed at newspaper and magazine 
ads and the other third was spread 
loosely among radio, tv, outdoor 
and whatnot advertising. 



New York mayor Robert Wag- 
ner doesn't think Hollywood has 
any chance of wxesting away tv 
production leadership from the 
east this year. 

His prediction is that New York 
will be a bigger hub of activity than 
ever. 

Speaking to a joint meeting of the 
RTES and AWRT, Mayor Wagner 
foresaw the expansion of the broad- 
cast industry in New York and he 
backed up his crystal balling with a 
pledge of full cooperation and aid to 
keep radio and tv going strong in his 



city. 



^ 



John D. Keating, president and gen- 
eral manager of KONA-TV. Honolulu, 
has been elected 1957 president of the 
Hawaiian Association of Radio and 
Television Broadcasters. . . . Henrv 
Schacte. v. p. of Lever Brothers, has 
been elected treasurer of the Ass'n 
of National Advertisers. . . . Film Pro- 
ducers Association of New York is 
now issuing a monthly newsletter out- 
lining industry highlights. First edi- 
tion (January I is just out. 



RADIO STATIONS 

WOK v.p. Robert Leder and KLIF 
president Gordon McLendon have 
switched from swapping argu- 
ments to swapping time. 

Leder and McLendon. who were re- 
cently on opposite sides in a hot de- 
bate about contests-giveaways as rating 
hypos, have just worked out an ar- 
rangement whereby the New York sta- 
tion will advertise its shows and per- 
sonalities on the Dallas station and 
\ ice versa. 

Object is for KLIF to attract the at- 
tention of national clients while WOR 
can beam sales messages to Southwest- 
ern advertisers having New York dis- 
tribution. 

The campaigns will start in both 
markets on 21 Januarv and will last 
a month. Class A time one-minute an- 
nouncements will be used. 



Current idea-at-work at WCAU is 
a way to translate ratings into a 
common denominator — sports. 

The Philadelphia station is sending 
ad agencies a brochure that uses pic- 
tures of sporting events to illustrate 
the impact of various ratings. Rating 
range of 3.0 to 5.9 is used. 

Here s the way it works: 

The brochure shows an aerial photo 
of an overflow stadium at an Army- 
Navv game with the following cap- 
tion. "A 4.8 rating means 110.000 
people — the equivalent of a "sell-out" 
Army-Navy game at Municipal Stadi- 
um. Philadelphia." 

For a 3.0 rating. Yankee Stadium 
iammed to the rafters for a final 
World Series game is pictured. 



Another Philadelphia station. WP- 

EN, has inaugurated a sort of book- 
of- the -month -club promotion idea. 
Doubledav best sellers are being sent 
to agencv timebuvers and advertisers 
at the rate of one a month for the next 
six months. . . . KCRV. Caruthersville. 
Mo., has been getting fan mail from 
timebuyers on its newly designed rate 
card. Card in easy-to-file 9" by 4" size 
includes rates, coverage map. operat- 
ing hours, phone and county. 
WlBG's new Top 0' The Morning 
show represents a radical departure 
from its past programing of 21 years 
standing. The 6 to 10 a.m. slot no 



60 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 



This is the Southeastern j 

New England Market ... 810,700 Homes! 




WJAR-TV Channel 10 

Reaches More of These Homes 
Every Day Than Any Other 
Television Station* 




wjar-tv 



CHANNEL 




Represented by 
WEED Television 



PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND 

A service of The Outlet Company 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 



61 



®HMHWM©n[Linr2r 



built the AUTOMOBILE 

. . . and 

TV 




Detroit saw its first 
automobiles in 1896, 
thanks to the vision of 
CJiarles B. King and 
Henry Ford. 



The horseless carriage, with its promise of new 
pleasure and convenience for millions, created a faith that 
fathered one of America's most important industries. 

WWJ-TV, with its consistent leadership and emphasis on 
quality, has given Detroiters another well-founded faith — 
faith that dialing Channel 4 provides the finest in television 
entertainment, complete and objective news coverage, out- 
standing community service features ... all in good 
taste, always. 

Seeing is believing to the great WWJ-TV audience — 
a priceless advantage to every advertiser. 




ASSOCIATE am.Fm station wwj 

■^ f.r%t .« M.ch.got, • owned 4 opuoffd bj !*• Drfrtvl Not 
Nolionol (tepreicnlO'i*ei M«S, G'iffin, WoodwO'd, Inc. 



longer carries shows for selected audi- 
ences I mainly religious) and the time 
is now open for and attracting nation- 
al advertisers. . . . More local sta- 
tions reporting record sales in "56 
include WFBR, Baltimore, with over- 
all volume up 37'V . and KLZ, Denver, 
hitting the highest mark in both na- 
tional and local sales. 

TV STATIONS 

Westinghouse Broadcasting Co. 
will sponsor an industry-wide con- 
ference on local service program- 
ing in Boston for three days, start- 
ing 27 February. 

The conference will be attended by 
75 representatives of radio and tv sta- 
tions. The group was selected to rep- 
resent a cross-section of broadcasters 
— large and small stations, independent 
and network affiliated, and from North, 
South. East and West. 

Plans are being supervised by Rich- 
ard M. Pack, WBC v.p. in charge of 
programing, and William J. Kaland, 
national program manager. J. B. Con- 
ley, special assistant to the president, 
is coordinator. 

Among the subjects to be taken up 
are: award winning shows, news- 
paper and trade paper critics views, 
how to use commercial research for 
public service, serious music, different 
approaches, showmanship, news, free 
films and tapes, spot announcements, 
and religious programs. 



"Many A Heart Is Happy" is the 
title of KWTV's brochure describing 
its major public service project that 
brought Oklahomans an intimate, on- 
the-spot report of their servicemen and 
women stationed in Europe. The Okla- 
homa Citv Station sent its news direc- 
tor Bruce Palmer to cover 16,000 
miles and 92 military installations in 
Europe to film interviews with Okla- 
homans serving in the Armed Forces. 
He brought back over 15,000 feet of 
film which was edited into 13 half- 
hour programs. A total of 716 service- 
men were interviewed, representing 75 
of the state's 77 counties. 



Local tv programing notes: WDBJ- 
TY. Roanoke. Va.. reports sales suc- 






62 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 




wF it's not good music, Ed Murphy 
**~^ won't use it. The Ed Murphy shows, 
four times daily on WSYR, have a distinc- 
tive quality all their own, because they're 
produced by a specialist in musicianship and 
showmanship. Ed Murphy has spent 21 
years working with the top recording stars 
of our time, in radio and the theater. He's 
the best in his line in Syracuse radio, be- 
cause like all WSYR's featured performers, 
he knows what he's doing and likes doing it. 
In short, he's a real pro! 

NBC Affiliate 



BEST COVERAGE 
OF A REALLY 
BIG MARKET 





The WSYR coverage area has a 
population over 1.5 million — 
annual buying power in excess 
of 52.2 billion. 



5 KW • 570 KC 



SYRACUSE, N 



Repreien/eo* Naiionatly by HENRY I. CHRISTAt CO., INC 



Rose-Bowl Winner! 







^M WAFB-TV Wins 6th Nationa 
Merchandise Award in 2 years. 



(Qxir 




WAFB-TV's Promotion Department did it again . . won a trip to the 1957 
Rose Bowl for doing the best promotion job in the nation on the "Frank 
Leahy Show." Six times in 19 months, WAFB-TV has finished in the money 
in promotion contests . . . four "firsts", one "second", one "top four". 



Here is the record: 




m 



1957 Rose Bowl trip offered 
by "Frank Leahy Show":. 
WAFB-TV WON IT! 



"The Millionaire" offered 
$1,000 for best promotion. 
WAFB-TV WON IT! 



Screen Gems national pro- 
gram promotion contest. 
WAFB-TV WON IT! 



H 2 

m. 



Show" promotion con- 
WAFB-TV WON DOU- 
IRST PRIZE! 



(( 



m 



0i 



1956 Billboard promotion 
contest. WAFB-TV's only 
entry WON SECOND PRIZE! 



1956 "Frank Leahy" con- 
test. WAFB-TV WAS IN 
TOP FOUR". 



RATING WINNER, TOO! 

The latest available ARB gives WAFB-TV 7 out of the 10 top programs 

in the market. 



c 

B 
S 



WAFB - TV 

affiliated with WAFB, AM-FM 
Reps: Blair Television Associates 



A 
B 
C 



'First In TV in Baton Rouge' 



cess from its newl\ inaugurated early 
morning barn dance type show — 50% 
sold after just two weeks on the air. . . . 
Bridge made a successful tv debut, re- 
centl) winning critical acclaim from 
Time Magazine, when WOR-TV. New 
York, telecast the closing hour of the 
International Bridge Tournament. 

Tv Applications: Between 14 Janu- 
ary and 19 January one station took 
to the air. and one received a con- 
struction permit. 

New station on the air was KONO- 
TV, Channel 12. San Antonio, tower 
485 feet above average terrain, 316 
kw visual, owned by Mission Telecast- 
ing Corp., ABC-TV affiliation. 

Construction permit went to Carroll 
R. Hauser (KHUM) for Channel 13, 
Eureka. Calif., permit allows 3.98 kw 
visual. 

REPS 

Richard O'Connell is urging all 
his stations to flat-rate their rate 
cards when offering packages, and 
eliminate the frequency discount. 

O'Connell sa\ s this makes life easier 
for timebuyers and estimators and 
cuts down on billing time for the sta- 
tions. 

NBC Spot Sales sold Tex and Jinx 
McCrary's "New York Close-Up" 
on four radio stations to Slender- 
ella Systems, Inc.. Stamford, 
Conn. 

The contract calls for broadcast of 
the 10-minute program three times per 
week on radio stations WRC\ . Phila- 
delphia: \\M \H. Chicago: KOA, Den- 
ver, and KSD. St. Louis. 

Slenderella. which has an exclusi\it\ 
option for the show 7 in 35 other radio 
markets, also contracted for the 12:05- 
12:30 a.m. segment three times weekly 
of the '"Tex and Jinx" Show on 
\\ RCA, New York. 

"New York Close-Up" consists of 
highlights of the celebrity Interviews 
which are broadcast Monday through 
Frida\ on \\ RC \. from 10:35 p.m. to 
12:30 a.m. 

The contract was placed through 
Management Associates of Stamford, 
Conn. 

The Katz Agency has a new calen- 



64 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 




-V-.-V"^ : 











r 

j mm 



A NEW 




Now in Houston television acquires a new 
flexibility ... a soundtrack for modern 
living . . . under the genial guidance of 
Houston's long time favorite Ted Nabors! 
The 7 to 9 morning audiences listen and watch 
what they've missed on TV and Radio — 
maximum music and minimum talk with the 
best in pop records, latest news, weather 
information and time service . . . all on KTRK-TY's 
* SOUNDTRACK! 



CONCEPT IN BROADCASTING 



^SOUNDTRACK, backed by written testimonial 
proof from satisfied clients has done an 
outstanding job of salesmanship. Another 
unquestionable indication that KTRK-TV's 
better showmanship, better shows, mean better 
results. For your next buy ... for your 
best buv . . . buv KTRK-TV and, ask about 
* SOUNDTRACK ... the program that 
gets results. 



KTRK-TV 

Channel 13 

The Chronicle Station 

P. O. Box 12 

Houston 1, Texas 



iational Representatives: 

W'f- Hollingbery Company, 

500 Fifth Avenue, 

New York 36, New York 



"copyrighted feature 
of KTRK-TV 




Houston Consolidated Television Co. 
General Manager, Willard E. Walbridge 
Commercial Manager, Bill Bennett 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 



65 



_ 



<lar for rapid calculation of ex- 
piration and renewal dates. It is 
eas) to see at a glance when a 13-20- 
39-52 week cycle ends. The calendar 
is available to both clients and non- 
clients. 

H-K Representatives, Inc.. and H-R 
Television, Inc., opens a new branch 
office Miami 1 February, with Alex 
Campbell, Jr. head salesman . . . CBS 
Television Spot Sales appointed new- 
account executives: James E. Conlev 
and Fred L. Nettere in New York; 
George W. Faust in Chicago . . . The 
K.ii/ Agency executives honored at 
New York's Barberry Room, Morris S. 
Kellner, radio sales manager, for his 
25 years with the firm. 

COMMERCIALS 

Look for talent contracts on film 
commercials to get more compli- 
cated. Here are two upcoming trends 
to watch: 

• Some talent agents are starting to 
ask for contracts with a six months 
time limit on run of the commercial. 



We Want 

WIVES 

Housewives buy the 
products radio advertisers 
sell and that's why we fea- 
ture the standards of today 
and yesterday. 

No rock and roll, no 
rhythm and blues, no hill- 
billy, no progressive jazz- 
just the music most people 
like to listen to most of 
the time. 

To reach the housewife you sell, 
buy 



WJHP 



AM 
FM 



Jacksonville, Florida 



lime limit contracts are usually sub- 
ject to re-negotiation at the end of the 
half-year period and are designed to 
protect the agent's client from get- 
ting too identified with one product. 
• West Coast talent 1 in particular 
motion picture character players and 
starlets who are now rushing into the 
commercials field I is beginning to ask 
for advance payments on guaranteed 
residuals. 

The biggest year yet for employ- 
ment of announcers and actors in 
commercials is seen by Rex Coston, 
radio production manager at Ogilvy, 
Benson & Mather. Coston predicts a 
20Vf increase over 56. 



FILM 

Question of how much money ad- 
vertisers are willing to pay for 
syndicated film has been agitating 
film producers in recent weeks. 

John Mitchell, Screen Gems sales 
v.p., stated at a recent press confer- 
ence that a production nut of around 
$25,000 per episode is about tops. A 
number of distributors queried by 
sponsor roughly agreed though some 
said another $5-10.000 might be worth 
the gamble under certain circum- 
stances. 

Guild Films disagrees and says its 
sales of Capt. David Grief prove its 
point. The first 39 episodes of the 
Jack London stories have been budg- 
eted at nearly $50,000 per. according 
to Guild. 

Jack Cole, Guild sales v.p., reports 
that Capt. David Grief has been sold 
in virtually every major tv market out- 
side of the eastern U.S. 



Weekend exposure for top feature 
films is one of the keys to getting 
maximum audience. 

Three weekend periods appear to be 
best: Friday and Saturday nights and 
Sunday afternoons; the first two pe- 
riods are good because people can stay 
up late and the latter period because 
of audience availability. 

Bristol-Myers, biggest user of fully- 
sponsored features, has so far bought 
only Friday and Saturday nights in 
six markets; Colgate bought Friday 
night in Los Angeles. 

An example of Sunday afternoon au- 



WANTED 



Are You the Sales Manager 
SPONSOR Needs in the 
Midwest? 

SPONSOR is looking for a Sales 
Manager in the Midwest with a 
strong sales record. This is a key 
sales area, with headquarters in 
Chicago, and requires a top- 
notch man who is looking for an 
exceptional opportunity and is 
willing to work for it. You'll be 
calling on top station executives 
in 10 states. There's plenty of 
prestige, sales advantages, and 
interesting activity to this assign- 
ment — plentv of travel, too. If 
you're the man. you'll have a 
proven sales record, some knowl- 
edge of station operation, a repu- 
tation for square dealing, and a 
deep down desire to improve 
your financial position. Please 
rush full details. 

BOX 261 

SPONSOR, 40 E. 49 

NEW YORK 17 






66 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 



diences comes from \\ SB-TV. Atlanta. 
which inaugurated its MGM features 
on 6 January (12:15-2:30 p.m.). A 
special ARB telephone coincidental 
for the show \C.ommamt Decision) 
^.i\e the station a 27.4 rating and an 
82% share of audience. 



Though syndicated film news isn't 
usually looked on as top-flight 
dramatic fare, it has its moments. 

Case in point: CBS Newsfilm's spe- 
cial 15-minute production of "Hun- 
gary in Revolt." filmed in the midst 
of the fighting. The show, narrated l>\ 
Doug Edwards, was sent to subscrib- 
ers in addition to the regular service. 

Howard Kany. CBS Newsfilm man- 
ager, reported that man) stations 
showed the program in prime time 
and. in a number of cases, pre-empted 
commercial time. It was used. Kany 
said, both as an independent program 
segment and the nucleus for half-hour 
programs. 

MCA TV's newest syndicated show, 
State Trooper, is going over big 
with beer concerns. 

The show was original!) sold to 
Falstaff Brewing in 71 markets. Then 
C. Schmidt & Sons. Philadelphia brew- 
er, picked up the tab in five markets. 

Recent sales include Schlitz Brewing 
on WNBQ. Chicago; Hamm Brewing 
on KSTP-TV. Minneapolis: Catling 
Brewing of Cleveland. 

Other recent sales include the Coca 
Cola bottler for North Dakota and 
Kroger on WKRC-TV, Cincinnati. 
KTTV, Los Angeles, is syndicating 
Frontier Doctor after acquiring rights 



$ft€/ People 



Listen 



3IRMINGHAM 

THE Voice OF ALABAMA 



John Bloir & Co 



in the three west coast states. . . . CBS 
Tv Film Sales reports that Assign- 
ment Foreign Legion, which will soon 
be seen in the I ,S., was rated first or 
second among commercial tv shows 
in the London area during the last 
two weeks of December. 



Daytime stripping, a growing factor 
in I . S. tv film programing, has been 
exported to South America by F&G. 
Following a test in Mexico City. I'&C 
ordered five half-hour Ziv shows for 
stripping in two Venezuela markets . . . 
Canadian sales recentU made include 
a six-station regional deal of Life with 
Elizabeth b\ Guild to Sterling Drug via 
D-F-S and a sale to CBC of Brave 
Eagle I dubbed in French I by S. W. 
Caldwell. The latter show appeared on 
CBS TV and will also run in Italy and 
the I nited Kingdom. 

RESEARCH 

The Canadian Institute for Moti- 
vational Research has just been 
established. 

The new Institute will be directed 
and staffed by Canadians, but will be 
associated with the parent organiza- 
tion: The Institute for Motivational 
Research at Croton-on-Hudson. New 
York, which is directed by Dr. Ernest 
Dichter. 

Officers of the Canadian Institute 
include: 

Ralph F. Bowden. president. Bow- 
den is also president of Trans-Canada 
Marketing Studies. 

James F. Hickling. first v. p. and 
director of technical operations. He 
is a prominent Toronto industrial psy- 
chologist. 

John C. Robertson, v. p. in charge 
of administration. 



Advertising effectiveness can be 
scientifically measured and pre- 
dicted, a cosmic rav physicist told 
the N. Y. chapter of the American 
Marketing Ass n. 

The scientist. Dr. Marcello Vidale. 
now working for the management con- 
sultant. Arthur D. Little. Inc.. said to 
AMA members 21 January that studies 
suggest: 111 there is a point beyond 
which advertising is ineffective and 
i 2 l sales of a product that is not ad- 
vertised decline in a mathematically 
predictable manner. ^ 



STOCK MARKET 

Following stocks in air media and 
related fields will be listed each issue 
with quotations for Tuesday this week 
and Tuesday the week before. Quota- 
tions supplied by Merrill Lynch, 
Pierce, Fenner and Beane. 



\ rw 


York Stock Exchange 






In'-. 


Tues. 


Net 


Stock 


l.'.Jan. 


22 Jan. 


< hange 


AB-PT 


22% 


23 


+ % 


AT&T 


176% 


174V 4 


-2% 


Avco 


6% 


m 


+ % 


CBS "A" 


32% 


30 


-2% 


Columbia Pic. 


18% 


18% 


- % 


1 .new 3 


21 


20 


-1 


Paramount 


28% 


29% 


+ Vi 


RCA 


33% 


32% 


- % 


Storer 


26% 


26V 2 


+ % 


20th-Fox 


24% 


24% 


+ Vh 


Warner Bros. 


28 


27% 


- % 


Westinghouse 


55 


:>t's 


- 7 /s 


American Stock 


Exchange 




Vllied Artists 


3% 


3% 


+ Vi 


( &( '. Super 


1 


1 




DuMont Labs. 


5 


5% 


+ 3 A 


Guild Films 


3% 


3% 


+ % 


\T\ 


8% 


8% 


- % 



We Want 

WIVES 

Housewives buy the 
products radio advertisers 
sell and that's why we fea- 
ture the standards of today 

and yesterday. 

No rock and roll, no 
rhythm and blues, no hill- 
billy, no progressive jazz — 
just the music most people 
like to listen to most of 
the time. 

To reach the housewife you sell, 
buy 



WJHP 



AM 
FM 



Jacksonville, Florida 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 



67 



RIGHT I 











STARTLING PROOF: You get 76,701 more TV homes when 
you buy WFBG-TV, Altoona, in combination with Pittsburgh. 
In this area — day and night, seven days a week — WFBG-TV 
delivers average 'audiences 30.1% greater than Johnstown; 
71.4% more quarter-hour firsts. Ask BLAIR-TV for the proof: 
ARB, November 1956; ARB Altoona Coverage Study, 
March 1956. 

OHLY BASIC CBS-TV STATIOH SERVIHG THE AREA 




ON 




WFBG-TV 

ALTOONA, PENNSYLVANIA 

Channel 10 

ABC-TV • NBC-TV 

Represented by BLAIR-TV 

operated by: Radio and Television Div. / Triangle Publications, Inc. / 46th & Market Sts., Philadelphia 39, Pa. 

WFIL-AM • FM iTV, Philadelphia, Pa./ WNBF-AM • FM • TV Binghamton, N. Y. 

WHGB-AM,Harrisburg, Pa. / WFBG-AM • TV, Altoona, Pa. / WNHC-AM • FM • TV, New Haven-Hartford, Conn. 

National Sales Office, 4 8 5 Lexington Avenue, New York 17, New York 






SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY- 1957 



What's happening in U. S. Government 
lliat affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



26 January 'l'ln- filial report of the Senate Commerce Committee's last year hearings on 

Copyright 1957 I I • 1 »I. r ■ • .• • • 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. ,V <'Olll(l Wllldup a < ni/.Y4|ll ll I <ll dlSSenting opinions. 

To avoid that as much as possible committee counsel Nick Zapple summoned special 
counsel Kenneth Cox back from the westcoast for co-authorship of the report. 

Because the hearings roamed over almost every facet of tv, it will be a major triumph 
for Zapple and Cox if they can draw up a report on which the majority of the committee 
can see eye-to-eye. 

What is anticipated is this: there'll he not only a majority and a minority opinion hut 
dozens of "splinter" opinions on various topics noted in the final wrap-up. 

Of course, all this has meant one delay after another in getting out an acceptable docu- 
ment. 



The Senate Commerce Committee is no more set in terms of party control 
than any other Senate group these days. 

The 49-47 division makes the balance sort of skittish in view of the announced de- 
termination by Republicans to take over organization of the upper chamber if they can 
gain a single vote. 

The event to watch on this score is the Senatorial election in Texas to name a succes- 
sor to Price Daniel. If the choice turns out ardently pro-Eisenhower, then the vote of Vice 
President Nixon will upset the applecart and accord all Senate chairmanships to Repub- 
licans. 



What makes the foregoing delicate balance important to the broadcasting in- 
dustry, and especially to the networks is this: 

Sen. John Bricker (R., Ohio), stands ready to take over the reins of the Senate Com- 
merce Committee at the drop of a Democratic seat (which could also be brought about by 
a member's death). 

And Bricker's pet peeve are the networks and his pet goal is have the networks brought 
under the authority of the FCC. 

So long as Sen. Warren Magnuson (D., Wash.) occupies the Commerce Committee chair 
the chances of approval for Bricker's objective are very, very dim. 

But should Bricker hold the gavel again it would mean another royal roasting for 
the networks under the public spotlight. 

The networks have reason also to be a little concerned about the FCC's special 
network study committee, headed by Dean Roscoe Barrow. 

Hints of dissatisfaction with some network practices have already leaked out of the 
study committee. Again, it is less a matter of concrete action than of adverse publicity. 
The commissioners are not necessarily going to agree with the findings, but the Barrow re- 
port will gain wide publicity. 

With the report not due until 30 June, the FCC is expected to be less candid than last 
year, if and when called meanwhile before Congressional committees. It will prefer with- 
holding comment until Barrow has made his report. 

This tactic could well have a boomerang effect, since the FCC will quite likely prefer to 
ignore many of the Barrow recommendations. 

SPONSOR • 26 JANUARY 1957 69 




New High-Capacity TP-7 Slide Projector. Dual drums hold a total 
of 36 slides. For top performance in color and monochrome. 



REMARKABLE NEW FEATURES ASSURE 




MECHANICAL VERSATILITY 

"Free wheeling" principle, with simple lever release (A), permits either 
drum to be twirled for easy inspection and slide changing. Slides 
move smoothly and lock securely in show position. Each drum can be 
operated independently of the other. 




PREVIEW CONVENIENCE 

All slides are illuminated for easy viewing making it 
easy for projectionist to preview them. Last-minute 
changes can be made before they reach the 
"show" position. 



You told us what you wanted . . . we listened, 

designed, field tested . . . with the resul 



DESIGNED 

THE WAY 

YOU WANT IT! 



This new professional slide 
projector excels in performance 
and operating convenience! 



Recognizing the increasing importance of slides in 
programming at every television station, RCA 
resolved to do something about the projection 
equipment. 

SURVEY OF USERS— At the outset, a survey 
was made among users of film-slide equipment to 
find out what was wanted most. 

NEW DESIGN PROJECTOR— The result is a 
truly professional projector for television use that 
is exactly tailored to your needs . . . with so many 
operating advantages it's a pleasure to use ! It has 
an ideal capacity of 36 slides— large enough for 
handling 99% of all station needs, yet just right 
for ultra flexibility. 



SUCCESSFUL FIELD TEST-The TP-7 Slide 
Projector has been field tested in actual day-to-day 
service at a busy television station — WBTV, 
Charlotte, N.C. So successful was this trial run, 
the station people did not want to part with the 
projector when the test was completed ! 

"OPERATION VIRTUALLY FLAWLESS"- 
According to Thomas E. Howard, WBTV Vice 
President and Managing Director of Engineering 
and General Services, "During the testing period, 
the TP-7's operation was virtually flawless. An 
estimated 12,000 slides were run, 170 slides per day 
on-air, 60 slides in previews and rehearsals." 




Write for illustrated brochure containing complete information 
In Canada: RCA VICTOR Company Limited, Montreal. 

RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 

Broadcast and Television Equipment Camden, N. J, 



OPERATIONAL CONVENIENCE AND FLEXIBILITY 




QUICK LAMP CHANGE 

Use lamp to failure — reserve lamp instantly slides into place. High- 
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UNITIZED CONSTRUCTION 

Designed for ease of operation and servicing. Drums, 
drum-covers and optical assemblies are easily re- 
moved for cleaning and maintenance. 



A roundup of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



26 JANUARY 

Copyright 1957 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INO. 



One of the aftermaths of this season's weakness in network tv programing is 
showing up at General Foods: 

John E. Brady is out as director of advertising services. 

Brady's tv functions are being split between Edwin Ebel, who personally will look after 
program and talent buying, and Clem Hathaway, former SSCB account executive, who will 
coordinate the media buying. 

Brady had reported to Ebel (whose title remains v. p. in charge of advertising and con- 
sumer relations.) 



McCann-Erickson's new consultant arrangement with Morton Downey brings an 
influential representative of the northern block of Coca-Cola stockholders into the 
agency's fold. 

After his singing days, Downey became a goodwill ambassador for Coca-Cola; more- 
over, he bought into the company and set up shop as a bottler. 

His function now is to advise McCann-Erickson on sales promotion and merchandising, 
also make public relations appearances. 



Arturo Toscanini's passing last week had some Kudner oldtimers remember- 
ing The Episode of the 40 Missing Musicians. The story goes like this: 

While General Motors was sponsoring the maestro, a top Detroit official noticed during 
a studio visit that the orchestra had onlv 56 men — whereas the contract stipulated 96. 

NBC explained to the dubious scout that Toscanini was playing an all Beethoven-Mozart 
program in which the louder and brassier sections of the orchestra weren't necessary. 

Toscanini really patched it all up nicely the next week in his own way, however: He 
played Wagner with 112 musicians. 



As you might suspect, most reps hail from the space-selling and agency fields — 

areas where the powers of persuasion get a fine sharpening. A few, though, came via a more 
oblique route (including one whose FBI training undoubtedly is a handy thing in these days 
of conflicting rating and coverage claims). Here are some of the major reps and their 
origin : 



Lew Avery ad agency 

Sterling Beeson station manager 

John Blair ad agency 

Joe Bloom talent agent 

George Boiling station manager 

Henry Christal space salesman 

Max Everett., space salesman 

Helen Gill public relations 

Arthur Gordon printing trade 

Lloyd Griffin ad agency 

John Harrington . ad agency 

George Hollingbery space salesman 

Frank Headlev FBI special agent 

William Knodel space salesman 

Robert Meeker ad agency 

James McConnell ad agency 



Joe McGillvra space salesman 

Richard O'Connell space salesman 

Ted Oberfelder station manager 

John Pearson announcer 

Preston Peters space salesman 

Edward Petrv ad agency 

William Rambeau space salesman 

Paul Raymer ad agency 

Stephen Rintoul transcriptions 

David Simmons .. station sales 

Peggv Stone station relations 

Lloyd Venard .. station salesman 

Ed Voynow transcriptions 

Wythe Walker station sales 

Joe Weed __ space salesman 

Russel Woodward ad agency 



72 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 





KCMO-TV 



KPHO-TV 
WOW-TV 



. . . Over KCMO-TV with AAGAA's film classics, and Trendex 
shows Channel 5's complete dominance in Kansas City: 

Jan. 2 Jan. 4 Jan. 6 Jan. 7 Jan. 9 

KCMO-TV 24.1 23.1 34.5 28.5 23.4 

Station B 2.3 3.7 2.1 1.9 2.3 

Station C 7.5 15.4 5.1 7.4 9.7 

above ratings represent full two-hour period 10:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. 

Kansas City channel 5 

Syracuse channel 8 

Phoenix channel 5 



Omaha channel 6 



Joe Hartenbower, General Mgr. 
Sid Tremble, Commercial Mgr. 
Represented nationally by Katz Agency 

KCMO-TV . . . one of Mere- 
dith's Big 4 . . . all-family stations. 



® 



SPONSOR • 26 JANUARY 195"; 



73 



WMAR-TV 
LEADERSHIP 
IN BALTIMORE'S 

3-STATION MARKET 

• 

station share of sets in use 
6 P.M. to midnight 

Sunday 57.3 

Monday 49.4 

Tuesday 36.1 

Wednesday 43.1 

Thursday 44.8 

Friday 40.9 

Saturday 46.8 

choice availibilities 
Amos 'n Andy 6 to 6:30 P.M. 

Monday 15.8 

Tuesday 16.7 

Wednesday 15.8 

Thursday 17.4 

Friday 13.6 

Cumulative Rating . .. 28.7 

Racket Squad* 6:30 to 6:55 P.M. 

Monday 14.5 

Tuesday 19.9 

Wednesday , 15.5 

Thursday 17.9 

Friday 17.0 

Cumulative Rating 30.4 

Ratings taken from the December ARB Report 

"Currently running in the profitable 6:30 to 
6:55 P.M. segment are the following: WATER- 
FRONT, Monday; PUBLIC DEFENDER, Tuesday 
and Thursday; CITY DETECTIVE, Wednesday; 
FEDERAL MEN, Friday. 



WMAR-TV 

• • • * r 

CHANNEL 



SUNPAPERS TELEVISION, BALTIMORE, M0. 

TELEVISION AFFILIATE OF THE 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Represented b v THE KATZ AGENCY, Inc. 

New York. Detroit. Kansas City, San Francisco, 

Chicago, Atlanta, Dallas, Los Angeles 



Y&R MEDIA STRATEGY 

[Continued from page 31) 

Y&R's seven associate media direc- 
tors also have other duties beyond su- 
pervision of the media work done on 
their accounts. Each one is an expert 
in a specialized field and can be called 
upon by other members of the media 
department for help in those special- 
ties. For instance, Everett Erlick is 
the "business" expert. This means that 
he checks orders, acceptances and con- 
tracts for consistent policy before they 
get to Y&R's legal department. Frank 
Coulter is the spot radio-tv expert. 
Henry Sparks advises on magazines, 
Ed MacDonald on newspapers, Tom 
Skelton on outdoor, Jim English on 
network broadcast and George Leith- 
ner on miscellaneous and special 
media. 

"These men are all associate media 
directors with all-media responsibili- 
ties on their accounts," says William 
(Pete) Matthews, executive assistant 
to Levathes. "But at the same time, 
their specialized backgrounds and ex- 
perience can be drawn upon by the 
entire department." 

Since the all-media buying system 
has spread the decision-making power 
from the very top executive in the 
media department down to the buyers 
themselves, a Y&R media buyer can be 
deeply involved in network buys and 
negotiations, depending upon his cli- 
ent's needs. 

Joe St. Georges, for instance, works 
on five accounts that happen to be 
relatively light in spot activity, but 
have four network television shows. 



—^==3^1 




1 


:=== 1 MARRIAGE 




1 




LICENSf. 


FmS 


1 


\ 




18? <L 






^ A^. 






^B^^^' 






^^v 






ff 


'"H>loil^ 




cj^'e 






Pobir>>or7 



We Want 

WIVES 

Housewives buy the 
products radio advertisers 
sell and that's why we fea- 
ture the standards of today 
and yesterday. 

No rock and roll, no 
rhythm and blues, no hill- 
billy, no progressive jazz — 
just the music most people 
like, to listen to most of 
the time. 

To reach the housewife you sell, 
buy 



" — but KRIZ Phoenix says I have a 
money-back guarantee!" 



WJHP 



AM 
FM 



Jacksonville, Florida 






THERE'S ONLY ONE LEADER... 

KMLF-TV4 MONTANA 

THE CONTINENTAL DIVIDE STATION . BUTTE 






Sl'ONSOK 



26 JANUARY 1957 



*'\\ lifii it comes in Bcouting out net- 
work availabilities, we work verj 

closclv with ilic l\ -radio programing 
department," St. Georges told si>on- 
SOR, "There's a member from that de- 
partment in our account group, and 
he's the one I'd work with on a net- 
work problem.' 

Here's how a network t\ bu) might 
c\ ohe: 

Last summer, one ol St. Georges' 
product groups was discu--im: night- 
time network t\ availabilities for a cli- 
ent. St. Georges scouted out ever} 
potential opening on the three net- 
works at the time and examined each 
one for I 1 I suitabilit) of the time pe- 
iiod and potential audience. (2l sta- 
tion clearances and 1 3) cost. 

"I'd have a voice in whether a show 
is desirable," he added. "But this de- 
cision would be made in conjunction 
with the programing department. In 
some cases, like Robin flood, for in- 
stance, the programing department 
bu\s the property, and we place it in 
the best time slot we can find. Of 
course, network salesmen cover not 
onlv the buyer on the account, but the 
associate media directors and the top 
media executive as well. " 

Account assignments are made b\ 
Levathes and Matthews according to 
work load, not according to media or 
dollar volume. However, a buyer 
might be responsible for as much as 
$15 million or more in billings, if his 
accounts are heaw in network t\. An- 
other bu\er might be responsible for 
$3-4 million on accounts mainly in 
spot and hence requiring more detail 
work. 

Since there are 191 people in the 
media department alone, the adminis- 
trative detail and supervision i- vir- 
tually as heavy as it might be at the 
head of a medium-sized agency. This 
administrative function as well as liai- 
son with i \R's branch offices is the 
responsibility of Matthews. He's also 
the man in charge of Y&Rs media 
training program. 

"We alwaxs have men in training in 
our department," be explained. "Righl 
now we have a \ oung man in from our 
Chicago office, who's going through 
the agencv departments. He hasn t 
been at work in Chicago yet, but in a 
few week>. he'll be <ioing hack." 

Eugene Sweeney, the Chicago 



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SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 



75 



We Wanl 

WIVES 

Housewives buy the 
products radio advertisers 
sell and that's why we fea- 
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and yesterday. 

No rock and roll, no 
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just the music most people 
like to listen to most of 
the time. 

To reach the housewife you sell, 
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trainee, had worked in agencies for six 
years before being hired by Y&R. 
Four of those years were in media for 
smaller agencies. The indoctrination 
period in New York will take two 
weeks, since he has already had experi- 
ence as a buyer. 

"The branch offices like to send peo- 
ple to us to keep up to our operating 
standards," says Matthews. "And we 
like it because it gives the agency a 
greater sense of unity. "I'm actually 
on the phone with our four U.S. 
branch offices at least once a day. We 
provide a good deal of information 
services for them, and help them on 
network negotiations." 

Beyond the trainee program for peo- 
ple from the branch offices, Matthews 
also has a continuous training pro- 
gram for people who'll eventually be- 
come all-media buyers in Y&R's New 
York office. These young men, gener- 
ally recruited from graduate business 
schools like Columbia or Harvard, are 
scheduled for a training period of nine 
months to a year. 

"Lately, however, we've been need- 
ing assistant buyers so often, that the 
trainees have gone through their pro- 
gram in six months only," said Mat- 
thews. "Our training program in- 
volves three levels : ( 1 ) operation 
training which is done by the super- 
visors of media service units like con- 
tracts, estimating, forwarding while 
the people are on the job, (2) recruit- 
ment and training for young men in 
from schools or other agency depart- 
ments or other businesses and (3) 
training for our existing buying 
groups." 

At the time of sponsor's visit, four 
trainees were going through Y&R's me- 
dia department. In addition to the 
young man from Chicago, the other 
three trainees are being rotated on 
specific jobs during their nine-months 
training period. These three have the 
following background: one is a recent 
Harvard Business School graduate, one 
was an insurance analvst. the third 




formerly a newspaper space salesman. 
During the first two months of their 
training, they're rotated in specific 
jobs covering statistical work, estimat- 
ing and fill-in on any kind of help the 
buyers might need. After two months, 
they're expected to know the buyer's 
tools, rates, discounts. They are then 
assigned to one buyer a month to do 
junior assisting. 

"We try to have each work for four 
buyers in four months to get him more 
deeply into different accounts and me- 
dia schemes," Matthews explained. 
"During the next six months he mav 
be assigned to one or two buyers for 
three-month periods. By that point, 
as the need arises, he can be an assist- 
ant buyer." 

This training program has given the 
agency an opportunity to indoctrinate 
future buyers in the all-media system 
right from the start and to avoid a 
painful transition from media speciali- 
zation to "account thinking." 

Another phase of training is the 
three series of discussion meetings for 
assistant buyers, for buyers and for 
associate directors to exchange infor- 
mation. 

"The discussions for associate di- 
rectors and the supervisory staff are 
not formalized, but meetings of buy- 
ers and assistant buyers are on a 
schedule. The 27 assistant buyers are 
divided into five groups which cover 
five different subjects in each series — 
one on each of the major media. The 
subjects might be 'How to set up sta- 
tistical documentation,' or 'The steps 
in evaluating and picking announce- 
ments,' or 'The analysis of audience 
research in publications,' or 'Nature 
and preparation of broadcast con- 
tracts'." 

These discussion series, which run 
for five weeks at a time, are scheduled 
about three or four times a year. Each 
group meets once a week, generally 
Thursday mornings between 9:15 and 
10:00 a.m. 

"The same plan applies to biners. 
but the subjects are generally different. 
People bring up their own problems 
and experience in these seminars. 
\\ e're planning to have several run- 
throughs on the Nielsen Coverage 
Service No. 2, for instance." Matthews 
said. 

The buver discussions are usually 



SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 1957 




o 



< 
in 



in 

hi 

s 

e 




cost per thousand is 
44°o lower than its 
closest rival. 



M 



delivers 5.1 average 
between 8 and 5. No 
ratings below 4.4 
Pulse: Sept.-Oct. '56 




covers what counts! 
j 800,000 people in half 
millivolt contour. 
550,000 of them are 
in Franklin County . . . 
the home county. 



I 



Columbus, Ohio 

the station with 
a personality. 



(Jde-fkeAfote-We 
<ml eaU FoWoe 



led bj associate media directors 
who arc particular!) versed in .< certain 
subject. For instance, Jim English 
who's recent!) been brought into the 
media department as an associate di- 
rector from | n <\ inii^ work in research 
will Ir.id ilic Nielsen seminars. Erlick 
would handle discussions "I network 
contracts. ( !oulter nr Jones might lead 
the spot radio ami t\ seminars. Henry 
Sparks might discuss magazines. The 
last seminal in eaeh series is urncralK 
conducted either li\ Matthew- or 

I.e\ athes. 

"We also keep our buyers in New 
York ami in our branch offices up to 
date on new media developments 
through memos and through our bi- 
weekly publication. Media Miscellany ," 
said Matthews. "This year we're hop- 
ing to brin» out Media Miscellany 
once a week and to have a listing of 
rate increases in a separate bulletin. 

Summing up, Levathes said: "We've 
found that the all-media system makes 
it possible for our buyers to service 
their accounts most creatively. We 
don't have any print or radio or tv 
advocates. Each buyer's thinking be- 
gins with his accounts needs. They re 
able to have closer contact with other 
departments within the agency and to 
work more closely with the advertising 
and sales staffs of our clients." 

^ oung \ Kubicam has been satisfied 
with the success of the all-media oper- 
ation. The agency has found that its 
buyers have greater stature in the busi- 
ness than the media buyers of some 
other agencies because they're able to 
make budget and major media deci- 
sions. This increased stature has be- 
come apparent in those instances when 
buyers have left Y&R to go to other 
agencies. ("They're usually hired on 
an associate or media director level 
1>\ other agencies," one \ &R media 
executive told sponsor, i 

Since Y&R first went to an all-media 
buying set-up. a number of other ma- 
jor agencies have also considered the 
change. Leo Burnett and Bryan Hou-- 
ton. for instance, actually do have 
similar t\ pes of media departments. 
C>re\ \d\ertising was the most recent 
convert to this method of operation, 
instituted at Grey by Dr. Larry Deck- 
inger, v.p. in charge of media and 
research i See sponsor 15 December 
1956). ^ 



We Want 

WIVES 



Housewives buy the 
products radio advertisers 
sell and that's why we fea- 
ture the standards of today 
and yesterday. 

No rock and roll, no 
rhythm and blues, no hill- 
billy, no progressive jazz — 
just the music most people 
like to listen to most of 
the time. 

To reach the housewife you sell, 
buy 



WJHP 



AM 
FM 



Jacksonville, Florida 



Has Rochester 
by the Ears ! ) 




MELODIOUS MUSIC 



ABC NETWORK FEATURES 



TOPFLIGHT HOURLY NEWS 



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GET FACTS AND FIGURES 

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SPONSOR 



26 JANUARY 195' 




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James Fenimore Cooper's all- 
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Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 



Robert D. Levitt has been elected presi 
dent and a director of California Xationa 
Productions, NBC subsidiary. Levitt be 
came operating head of California Nation 
al last Fall with the title of vice presi 
dent-general manager. On his election to 
the presidency, he emphasized California 
National's position as the NBC film pro- 
ducing arm. Levitt came to California 
National as general manager in July 1956. Before that he was 
director of national sales at Screen Gems. He served as a vice 
president and a director of the Hearst Publishing Co. from 
1951 to 1955 and prior to that was a director of the Hearst Promo- 
tion Enterprises. From 1946 to 1947 he was eastern director 
of advertising, promotion and publicity for Selznick Productions. 
Before that he was associated with the New York Journal-American. 

Thomas R. Santacroce has been named 
vice president in charge of West Coast 
operations for Compton Advertising, Inc. 
He has served as vice president and gen- 
eral sales manager of the Ruppert Brew- 
ery in New York for the past two and a 
half years. He has also been associated 
with Biow and Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample 
in New York. In announcing Santacroce's 

appointment. Barton A. Cummings, Compton president, said that it 
"Marks another step in our continuing expansion program. Our aim 
is to provide a complete Pacific Coast service on a local as well 
as a national basis." Santacroce will make his headquarters in 
San Francisco. Norman E. Mork, v.p. and manager of the San Fran- 
cisco office, along with Waldo H. Hunt, v.p. and manager of the 
Los Angeles office, will continue to operate in those capacities. 

Stephen B. Labunski has been appointed 
a vice president of the Storz Stations, ac- 
cording to an announcement made by Todd 
Storz, president. Labunski joined the 
Storz Stations two and a half years ago. 
He has served as a member of the sales 
staff of WHB. Storz's Kansas City flagship 
station, and was appointed general mana- 
ger of WDGY. Minneapolis-St. Paul, when 
the Storz organization took over operation on that station in Febru- 
ary of last vear. Labunski is credited with guiding the station from 
a low position to the top rating spot in the Twin Cities. The num- 
ber one rating is based on January Trendex daytime figures. La- 
bunski is the fourth Storz Station manager to be named a v.p. 
Others are: Virgil Sharpe, KOWH. Omaha: George W. Armstrong, 
Will'.. Kansas City; and Fred Berthelson. WTIX. New Orleans. 





1 



M'nXsuK 



26 JANUARY 1957 



IN INLAND CALIFORNIA (and western nevadai 




RAD I O 










In this mountain-ringed market, the Beelinc serves an area with 
more than 2 v a million people who have more than $3*2 billion 
in spendable income. (Sales Management's 1956 Copyrighted 
Survey ) 

Beeline Radio delivers this rich market in the form of loyal 
listeners. And, by using all live stations, you reach them at a very 
low cost per thousand. 



lULcCAodkcJUq &ficadccL&ixt*q Cot*tf?o>u>if 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA • Paul H. Raymer Co., National Representative 




SPONSOR • 26 JANUARY 1957 



79 



SPONSOR 



Radio's rising rates 

A large number of radio stations, especially the strong 
independents, have upped rates once or more during the past 
few years. In 1957 agencies and advertisers can look for a 
large-scale acceleration of this trend. The trend will encom- 
pass network stations and independents as well as networks. 

Does this mean that radio will be priced high in 1957? 
Far from it. Radio stations and networks, which are just re- 
covering from a mass inferiority complex brought on by the 
early years of television, have been reluctant to ask anything 
near a proper price for their time and talent. While this re- 
luctance is fast fading, it will take several years at least for 
the 3,000 stations and networks of the U. S. to approach a 
rate norm commensurate with the value of the medium. In 
the meantime buyers can enjoy bargain rates. 

There is danger in the present situation both from the sell- 
ers' and buyers' viewpoints. We warn stations to keep their 
perspective during a year when radio is coming back strong 
in the esteem of the sponsor; specifically we warn stations 
not to go all out as they upgrade the rate card. We warn the 
advertiser to act fast and take advantage of radio's bargain 
opportunities; specifically to latch onto good time slots. 

Air advertising offends fewer people 

Radio and television broadcasters and advertisers can take 
a lot of pride in the report recently released that radio-tv ad- 
vertising copy over the past 10 years has been the cause of 
far fewer complaints than all other media. A. E. Tatham, of 
Tatham-Laird, and chairman of the American Association of 
Advertising Agencies' committee on improvement of adver- 
tising content, reports that newspapers and magazines ac- 
counted for two-thirds of the offenses while one-third is at- 
tributed to all other media including radio and television. 

It's good, for a change, to be able to cite a formal report 
that shows radio and television in a more favorable light. 
More importantly, it shows that broadcasters and advertis- 
ers are measuring up to their responsibilities in American 
community life. 



THIS WE FIGHT FOR: Close adherence to 
the codes of tlie N ART B by stations and 
sponsors alike. We fight for the highest stand- 
ards oj truthfulness and good taste in television 
and radio commercials. 







80 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

No turnover: A WW DC, Washing- 
ton, release reports its d.j., Fred Fiske, 
received a call from a listener asking 
permission to unglue the dial of one of 
her eight radio sets. Her teenage chil- 
dren had glued them all to 1260 
1 \\ \\ D< :'s dial position I . Sou there't 
a truly sticky story. 

Control: In a recent CBS Playhouse 
90 script, sponsor Ronson wrote out 
all the matches and wrote in cigarette 
lighters. Let's hope the light never 
failed. 

Job wanted: From The V. Y. Tunes 
-ADVERTISING: Brooks Brothers 
wardrobe: Ivy graduate. 26; agency 
experience: $5,500. What, no creivcut! 

Lid-flipping: \ John B. Stetson Co. 
survey revealed that doctors tend to 
wear hats like other doctors and news- 
papermen like other newspapermen, 
but "advertising men defy bracket- 
ing. Maybe the reason is careless hat- 
check girls in Madison Ave. eateries. 

New product: Weber Waukesha 
Brewing Co. of Waukesha. W is., is 
introducing a beverage called "Sassy." 
It is beer with a cola flavor. We can 
see that tv copy note: "Sassy, the 
pause that is driest." 

Analysis: Dr. Ernest Dichter. of the 
Institute for Motivational Research, 
had this to say about the executive 
type: "The born executive has the 
compulsion to be a father-chieftain." 
Like Copy Chief and Father Time- 
buyer? 

Couch-bound: Tv scripter Paddy 
Chayefskv is planning a television se- 
ries on psychiatric cases. They could 
call it Head Medic. 



Fr< 



The A. Y. 



Help wanted: 

7'/>/?es: 

Advertising Agencj 
GIRL FRIDAY 
They always get married ! . . . 
With a promise like that, they'll quick- 
ly fill the job! 

Borscht circuit: TV Guide reports 
Phil Carey's fan mail included a fan 
letter addressed to: "The 77th Bagel 
Lancers." Wonder if this teas the same 
fan who wrote to Lox \ ideo Theatre? 



SI'l)\M)H 



26 JANUARY 1957 






GARY COOPER 
ALONG CAME JONES' 





GINGER ROGERS 
THE GROOM WORE SPURS' 




JAMES STFWART 
ITS A WONDERFUL LIFE" 
TAB HUNTER GREGORY PICK 

"ISLAND OF DESIRE" "M»N W™ * MILLI0N " ^> <C" 

there are MORE good movies > 

INGRID BERGMAN 
"STRANGERS" 

ON ^fu** 

AVAILABLE NOW-MINUTE PARTICIPATIONS 1 " 

No flapper costumes— Model A Fords— Derby 

Hats- Knee-Length Skirts! KIRK D0UGLAS 

"THE CHAMPION" 

Feature films on KWK-TV in St. Louis star 

'4 

currently popular names in recent productions. 

These are just a few of the more than 

300 features now being programmed from 

United Artists and other packages. *^ ^ 



SHELLEY WINTERS 
"HE RAN ALL THE WAY" 



FRED MacMURRAY 
"BORDERLINE" 





(^ 



TOP PROGRAMS 
OF TWO NETWORKS 




DANA ANDREWS 
"A WALK IN THE SUN" 



RORY CALHOUN 
"ROGUE RIVER" 



Represented Nationally by 
The KATZ Agency, Inc 



THE LEADER IN ST. LOUIS TELEVISION 




CD 





SERVING THE GREAT 
ST. LOUIS MARKET 



Ok 








those 



THE FARMER'S DAUGHTER. Loretta 
Young, Joseph Cctten, Ethel Barry- 
more, Charles Birjdord and David 
Wayne in a delightful comedy pro- 
duced by Dore Senary— released by 
David O. Selznick. 



STRANGER ON THE PROWl. P . 

Muni, Joon Lorring and the serin 
tionol child aclor, Vittorio Monuntil 
in a gripping melodrama of a boyl 
growing love for a murderer wt-l 
protects him. [Na 



MAGNIFICENT 
MOVIES 





now on 



NOTORIOUS. Cary Grant, Ingrid Berg- 
man and Claude Rains in Ben Hecht's 
famous story directed by Alfred Hitch- 
cock. A Selznick release. 



GUEST WIFE. Claudette Colbert 01 
Don Ameche in a sophisticated coi 
edy about a gorgeous wife with 01 
husband too manyl 



KMBC-TV 

Channel 9 in Kansas City 



The most tremendous array of first-run 
feature movies ever programmed in Kansas 
City! 

Every night of the new year, a big new title 
hand-picked from all-time box-office smashes 
(including the powerhouse David 0. Selz- 
nick), from a fabulous collection of award 
winners, and from late-release features still 
playing theatrically. 

And all of these MAGNIFICENT MOVIES 
are slotted at a convenient time for family 
viewing, 10:15 p.m. every weeknight. They 
are indisputably the best, and the earliest, 
feature movies on television in Kansas Citv! 





COURT MARTIAL Dovid Niven and 
Margaret Leighfon in Anthony As- 
quith's study in suspense— a tense, 
exciting drama. 



MAN WITH A MILLION. Gregory Pe> 
in Mark Twain's hilarious comedy 
a down-and-outer who picks up 
million bucks, a million babes and 
million laughs! 




ISLAND OF DESIRE. Tab Hunter and 
gorgeous Linda Darnell in an emotion- 
swept drama— a fight to the finish for 
the only girl on a tropical island. 



STAIRCASE. George Brer 

Dorothy McGuire and Ethel Barrymo 
in the Dore Schory production of 
Selznick mystery-thriller that is c 
all-time classic. 




See Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. for availabilities. 

the SWING is to KMBC'TV 

Kansas City's Most Popular and Most Powerful TV Station 
Basic ABC-TV Affiliate 




Pi-'.ters. Griffin. 
Woodward, ■« 



DON DAVIS. President 

JOHN T. SCHILLING. Executive Vice el 

CEORCE HICCINS. Vice President ai I 

Sales Manager 
MORI CREINER. Manager. KMBC-TV 
DICK SMITH. Manager. KMBC-KF I 



R o, it's KMBC ^ Kansas City— KFRM^vr the State of Kai 



40* a copy • 910 « *••» 




20.2% Drug 

Dominance 

Market figures prove families living in 
WXEX-TV Grade B area spend 20.2% more 
on drugs* than families in Grade B area 
of any other Richmond market TV station 



Amount Spent on Drugs by Grade B Area Families 



Percentage 



WXEX-TV 
Station B 
Station C 



$12,205,000 



$10,130,000 



$10,155,000 



ioo% 



83% 



83.3% 



♦Cosmetics, toiletries, hair preparations, packaged medications 
Source: Sidney Hollander Associates 



WXEX-TV 



NBC BASIC — CHANNEL 8 irvm o. At«.o«, vie. p™. 



Tom Tlnsley, President 

National Representatives: Select S.ation Representatives in New YorW. Philadelphia, Baltimore. Washington. 



NCS -■ 2 MUDDLED 
BY DIFFERING 
INTERPRETATIONS 



Buyer and sella com- 
munication i- confused 
in varying interpreta- 
tions f NCS#2 1a 
both agencj and rep 

Page 23 



Dan River weaves 
spot television 
into the ad budget 

Page 26 

The story behind 
McCann-Erickson' 
change of address 

Page 28 

SPECIAL SECTIOh 
The tv film 
story: 1957 

Page 31 



Forjoe & Co. in Chicago. Seattle, San Francisco, los Angeles, Dallas. Atlanta. 







Not since the 
earliest settlers... 





Now... on our NTH* tower 

Soon ... in our all-new, most modern building. 

Maximum power on Channel 5. 



One third of the population of Wisconsin . . . and 
containing the Wonderful Fox River Valley cities, the 
Greater Green Bay metro zone, the Sheboygan- 
Manitowoc and Oshkosh-Fond du Lac zones. 

$1,039,841,400 retail sales 

214,669 TV sets 




Basic ABC, plus CBS, 

plus 

strong local programming 



Ask HEADLEY-REED 

to show you the new WFRV-TV 
Fact Book; or wire us. Choice 
availabilities at this moment. 



NEAREST TO HEAVEN". Highest antenna 
in Wisconsin and in 5 state area. 1165 ft. 
above average terrain. 

.«//'/ W////s*$fo>/A 




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Green Bay, Wisconsin 



JL- 




in IOWA: 



NEW A R B 
REPORT! 



KRNT-TV AGAIN 

Sweeps Ratings! 






16 



OUT OF TOP 



20 



9 out of top 10 Multi-Weekly Shows* 323 FIRSTS in 
7 out of top 10 Once-A-Week Shows* 476 Quarter Hours 






MULTI-WEEKLY m. 

RtT. 

* 1 . Russ Van Dyke News 1 0:00 P.M. 40.6 

* 2. Al Couppee Sports 10:20 P.M. 28.2 

* 3. Paul Rhoades News 6:00 P.M. 17.0 

* 4. Bill Riley's Rascals 5:20 P.M. 16.2 

* 5. Captain Kangaroo 8:00 A.M. 15.9 

* 6. Guiding Light 11:45A.M. 14.0 

7. Comedy Time 4.00 P.M. 13.3 

* 8. Cartoon Club 5:00 P.M. 13.2 

* 9. Garry Moore 9:00A.M. 13.1 

*10. Our Miss Brooks 1:00 P.M. 12.8 



ONCE-A-WEEK 

* 1. Ed Sullivan 55.8 

* 2. I Love Lucy 53.2 

* 3. 564,000 Question 51.3 

* 4, What's My Line 46.2 

* 5. $64,000 Challenge 41.0 

* 6. RedSkelton 39.9 

7. Lawrence Welk 39.4 

* 8. Lassie 39.0 

8. Perry Como 39.0 

10. WyattEarp 38.7 



Katz Has The Facts On That- 
Very Highly Audience Rated, 
Sales Results Premeditated, 
CBS Affiliated 

Station in Des Moines! 



ES TELEVISIO 




Channel 8 in Iowa 






SPONSOR 



2 FEBRUARY 1957 






2 February 1957 • Vol. 11, No. 5 



SPONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

The NCS —1 coverage muddle 

23 Buyer-seller communication is breaking down over varied agency inter- 
pretations of NCS#2. Here are the problems posed to stations and reps 

Dan River weaves spot rv into ad budget 

26 How a 75-year-old manufacturing firm revised media thinking to pioneer 
the use of tv for selling soft-goods with a campaign in 10 markets 

What's behind McCann-Erickson's big move? 

28 McCann-Erickson's rapid expansion dictated the move to larger quarters 
and a streamlining of media and tv radio programing operations 

FILM FOR TV: 1957 

Film's evergrowing supply 

32 A broad look at recent and future trends in the film distribution 
business, which vsill hit an estimated $120 million in 1957 

How advertisers use syndicated film 

34 Capsule case histories of important regional advertisers using syndi- 
cated film and an outline of the strategy involved in this choice 

Outlook for feature film 

36 Unique programing problems are presented by feature films. Here's 
how stations and advertisers are attempting to solve some of them 

What's available in tv film? 

38 Presented here is a cross-section of available syndicated and feature 
film, including practically all the important series and packages 






FEATURES 

16 Agency Ad Libs 

54 Agency Profile 

20 49th and Madison 

57 New and Renew 

62 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

5 Newsmaker of the Week 

78 Reps at Work 

52 Sponsor Asks 



72 Sponsor Hears 
9 Sponsor-Scope 
80 Sponsor Speaks 
60 Spot Buys 
80 Ten Second Spots 
14 Timebuyers at Work 
76 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 
69 Washington Week 



In Next Week's Issue 

Are agencies underplaying radio? 

The head of a radio network contends the medium suffers from neglect 
within agency tv-radio departments suggests splitting up departments 



Editor and President 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

Vice-President-General Manag 

Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

Miles David 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Senior Editors 

Alfred J. Jaffe 
Evelyn Konrad 
Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Assistant Editors 

Joan W. Holland 
Jack Lindrup 
Betty Van Arsdel 

Contributing Editors 

Bob Foreman 
Joe Csida 

Art Editor 

Phil Franznick 

Production Editor 

Erwin Ephron 

Photographer 

Lester Cole 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Advertising Director 

Arnold Alpert 

New York Manager 

Charles W. Godwin 

Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 
Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 
Promotion Manager 

Mort Winthrop 
Production Manager 

Jean L. Engel 
Advertising Staff 

Marilyn Krameisen 
Georqe Becker 

Administrative Coordinator 

Catherine Scott Rose 
Circulation Department 

Beryl Bynoe 

Emily Cutillo 

June Kelly 

Accounting Department 

Laura Oken 
Laura Datre 
Readers' Service 

Betty Rosenfeld 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive. Editorial, 
Circulation and Advertising Offices' 40 E 
49th St. i49th & Madison) New York 17. 
N. Y. Telephone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. 
Chicago Office: 161 E. Crand Ave. Phone: 
Superior 7-9863. Los Angeles Office: 6087 
Sunset Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4- 
8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave.. 
Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: United 
States $10 a year. Canada and foreign 
$11. Single copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. 
Address all correspondence to 40 E. 49th 
St.. N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. 
Published weekly by SPONSOR Publications 
Inc. Entered as second class matter on 
the 29 January 1948 at the Baltimore 
postoffice under the Act of 3 March 1879. 

Copyright 1957 

Sponsor Publications Inc. 




WOC TV 




^XMwuu 



Proved In 648,330 Pieces of Program 

J r"> 

M.iil received hv this Station During 

J 

(■> full Yens ol Telecasting . . . 



MISSOURI 



ILLINOIS 

■ 



TOP FIGURE each county - Number Pieces of PROGRAM Mail Received during 1955 . 
2nd FIGURE each county - Number of Pieces of PROGRAM Mail per 1,000 Homes. 



I his Fabulous response . . . 

91'. of it to local live telecasts 

. . . beg. in in 1950. That year 

. . WOC;- 1 \"s hrs. Full year on 

the air . . . 33,845 pieces of 
program mail were received; 
this mail tame from 23 Iowa- 
Illinois counties — 237 cities 
and towns. 
By 1955, this response jumped 
to 1(9,215 pieces of program 
mail received during a 12- 
month period; it came from 39 
Iowa-Illinois counties — 513 
cities and towns in these counties. 
Accompanying map shows 
breakdown of this 1955 pro- 
gram mail, proving WOC- TV's 
"Good Picture" area. 
WOC-TV Viewers are respon- 
sive. They respond to WOC-TV 
telecasts by mail. More import- 
ant, they respond to advertising 
on WOC-TV by purchases at 
retail outlets. We have a million 
success stories to prove it (well, 
almost a million). Let your 
nearest Peters, Griffin, Wood- 
ward representative give you 
the facts. Or call us direct. 




WOC-TV 39-COUJMTY COVERAGE DATA - 



Population 

Families 

Retail Sales 

Effective Buying Income 


• 
• 

• 
• 


1,568,500 

i84,800 

SI, 926,588,000 

S2,582,388,000 


Source 


• 


1956 Survey of Buying Income 
( Sales Management ) 


Number TV Homes 
Source 


• 
• 


317,902 

Advertising Research 

Foundation 




WOC-TV Owned and Operated by Central Broadcasting Company, 

Davenport, Iowa 



The Quint-Cities Station — 
Davenport and Bettendorf 
in Iowa; Rock Island, Mo- 
line and East Moline in 
Illinois 




Col B. J Palmer, president 
Ernest C Sanders, resident monoger 
Mark Wodlinger, resident sales managt 
PETERS, GRIFFIN. WOODWARD, INC 
Exclusive Notional Representative 






398,500 Home Radios . . . 164,225 Car Radios 
2 Popular Radio Stations at 1 Low Rate! 






* FLASH 



STATION 
COVERAGE 



Atfiiiitu 




WBRE and WSCR are top 
rated NBC affiliates. Either 
station is the "buy" in their 
individual areas . . . but, for 
the National or Regional 
advertiser they become the 
only 2-station combination 
to consider when planning 
your radio advertising to 
reach Pennsylvania's double 
"L" market. 









w. J <~-- ; -' 



2 



of the week 



The news: This month marks the 2Sth anniversary oj Edward 
Petry & Co., the first firm to organize as an exclusive representative 
for radio stations. The company now represents \(> it and radio 

station's i 2!! tv and 1!! radio), employs 5 I salesmen, and maintains 
offices in seven cities. 

The newsmaker: If you're well acquainted with Edward 
Petrj and familiar with his career in air media, you know thai he'd 
lie the last person who'd go for a prettied-up portrait Petrj has 
always wanted to he taken for what he is. Direct, aggressive, 
positive in his business views. The following personifies; Petry, 
the man: ever read) to battle for the concepts he believes in; 
whether dealing with seller or buyer, each knows exactlv where he 
stands: no pussyfooting nor nice-nellyism. This is the bulwark 
upon which Petry has built a business that alter 25 years ranks 
as a model of stability, reliability, 
and progress. Petry came into 
this field with a tremendous faith 
and enthusiasm. That faith and 
enthusiasm is as great today as the 
da) he opened his business with 
Henrv I. Christal and Ed \ oynow 
as his partners. 

It ma\ be that the passing years 
have mellowed him: a remark he 
made to sponsor will probabl) 
cause a mixture of surprise and 
understanding among the veterans 
in Petry's field. Said Petry, never 
the guy to wear his heart on his sleeve: 
readers that the one big regret I have is my breaking with Christal. 
I have always admired the man and I still do. Unfortunately, we 
didn't agree on certain things." 

Here are some views on the current trade scene that Petry also 
passed on to SPONSOR: 

A healthy sign for radio and tv would be a letdown in Con- 
gressional investigations of the networks. Even though he disagrees 
with some network policies, he believes that without networks tele- 
vision -would not be the mass medium it is today. 

He thinks that a representative operates with maximum effective- 
ness if his list is not too large. He believes that strong research 
and promotion are essential: backs up his concept with the biggest 
research and promotion staff in tv/radio rep ranks. His plans 
board, with tv vice-president Tom Knode at its head, is an example 
of the teamwork that Petry is building. 

You can get a measure of Petry's introspective nature from this: 
W hen asked to discuss the history of Edward Petry & Co.. he 
answered: "I don't believe in the past: it has already been accom- 
plished. I'd rather talk about the future."' ^ 




Edward Petty 

"You can tell vour 







SPONSOR 



2 FEBRUARY 1957 



i 





Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn, Inc. 

Northwestern Bank Building, Minneapolis 2, Minnesota. FEderal 8-8401 



Mr. Theodore F. Shaker 
WXIX Sales Manager 
5AA5 North 27th Street 
Milwaukee 9, Wisconsin 



December 3, 1956 






Dear Ted 

When we told you that national sales for Cream of 
Wheat were up 6%, you said, in a half -joking way, 
that they must be better than that in Milwaukee. 

Well, so help me, you're right. Cream of Wheat sales 
in Milwaukee are up 11$ so far this year over last. 

This is a WXIX success story, for you are the only 
station we are using in your market and the majority 
of Cream of Wheat's advertising is in television. 

This healthy increase is especially significant when 
you consider that Cream of Wheat engages in no special 
price concessions, cooperative advertising deals or 
premium promotions. This sales increase is strictly 
the result of good, old-fashioned, straight selling. 

So take a bow, Ted, for your great station. And on 
behalf of our client Cream of Wheat, sincere thanks. 



■ ■'». 




*!?*»***'*■' ■ -* — *•.*».•< •— 




WXIX 



CBS Owned, Channel 19. Milwaukee. Represented by CBS Television Spot Sales 




8 



SPONSOR • 2 FEBRUARY 1957 



Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 




SPONSOR-SCOPE 



2 FEBRUARY 

copyri«M 1957 "^ ,,,,c '' ;n B00n > <HJ see a ^^ tv snow followed by a Lever or Colgate program, trust 

sponsor publications inc. your eyes. For this week the exclusivity clause in network contracts is being over- 
hauled at long last ("exclusivity" is supposed to Bel up a buffer zone between compcti- 
tive sponsors) . 

Vmazing as ii may seem offhand, it was V&i, thai agreed t<» a modification of 
the old policy. CBS TV took up the issue directl) in Cincinnati, and trot a fast, polite "It's 
alright with us." 

Here's how the new exclusivity procedure henceforth will work in terms of the Cincin- 
nati giant: 

• P&G no longer will insist that there he a half-hour interval between one of 
its shows and the program of a company in the same general line of husiness. 

• The half-hour interval will apply only to hrands that are competitive to those 
heing advertised on the adjacent P&G show. 

For instance, if P&C elects to advertise a bar soap and a detergent on a specific P&G 
show, and the show that follows belongs to Lever, Lever would be restrained from plugging 
the Lux line — but it could plug Pepsodent. 

By agreeing to this revision of the exclusivity clause, P&G tacitlv admits two things: 
1 ) the old hlanket protection has outlived its usefulness, and 2) with P&G now in the 
process of expanding to other product fields, the exclusivity shoe could fit the other 
foot, too. 

What the switch means for the networks and advertisers is this: The former can 
hring in more products; and the latter will find it easier to move into prime 
periods as and when they become available. 

(For more details on the implications of this development, see SPONSOR-SCOPE 3 
November 1956; also SPONSOR article. Ts Adjacency Protection Now Obsolete? 17 Novem- 
ber 1956.) 

Vdjacency restrictions seem to he breaking down in spot radio, too. 

Sponsors and their agencies are beginning to waive the rule that a competitive product 
can't be on the same disk jockev show. 

That's because stations in more and more markets are sh\ in? away from this restraint 
because of the bullish situation in the medium. 

A current case in point: 

If it can't be exclusive. Pepsodent will accept a half-hour interval, and — if that's 
not possible — it will settle for a separation of 15 minutes. 

Esty 19 sure to share the big bows for the phenomenal sales and profits report 
that R. J. Reynolds will he releasing soon. 

The sales total will run well over $750 million, with about 95% coming from three 
brands— Camel, Winston, and Salem. Camel and Winston lead their respective field=. while 
Salem is way up there. Estv handles the whole advertising account. 

National spot radio and network tv both had healthy takes in November 

(latest month for which figures are available^. 

SRA's spot radio estimate comes to 16,708,000. a 36% increase over the same month in 
1955. The forecast for all of 1956 is $150 million — a new- high. 

PIB credits the three tv networks with a gross of $44,163,884 for November, up 13.7% 
over the previous year. ABC had S6.619.100. up 1.9%: CBS. $19,866,463. up 18.1 r ; : 
NBC. $17,678,312; up 14.1%. 

The 1956 gross for the three probablv w : ll be near the $450-million mark. 

SPONSOR • 2 FEBRUARY 1957 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

There's a real possibility that the eurrent spurt in spot tv may hit a momen- 
tary hump — particularly in the secondary and tertiary markets — during the second 
quarter. 

Quite a number of buyers have been warning rep salesmen about a pause ahead. The 
reason: 

Many stations have raised their rates with the advent of NCS#2. Now the bigger ac- 
counts want the spot budget hooks balanced to find out how the expenditures to 
date stack up with the original planning. 

It won't surprise the researcher — because he knows there always are more women at 
home than men — but the only tv fare this season that's had dominant male audiences 
are fights and football. 

Even the National Bowling Champions show on NBC Sunday nights gave the watching 
edge to women. No wonder White Owl gave up. 

Two or three of the westerns can claim they have a higher average of male viewers than 
the average night-time network show — though even here the women are in slight com- 
mand. They are Cheyenne. 29% male, 30% women: Wyatt Earp, 32% male, 33% women: 
Broken Arrow. 33% men, 35% women. 

Meanwhile. Jim Bowie — on the same ABC TV network — runs to 2795 male and 48% 
women. 

To judge from Nielsen, the spread of quality feature films had a much greater 
impact in 1956 on late viewing in Los Angeles than in New York. 

For Los Angele? the trend of homes tuned in minute-by-minute between 11 p.m. and mid- 
night. Monday through Friday, looked like this: 

PERIOD HOMES PERIOD HOMES INCREASE 

Jan.-Feb. 227,446 Oct.-Nov. 344,446 52% 

In New York, the 11 p.m. to midnight viewing pattern showed up as follows: 
PERIOD HOMES PERIOD HOMES INCREASE 

Jan.-Feb. 1.303,861 Nov.-Dec. 1.379,062 4.6% 

Note: These comparisons were processed by SPONSOR-SCOPE from data in the Niel- 
sen Station Index, whose tv homes for the two areas are: Los Angeles, 1,682,000: New York. 
1.128.900. 

The swing to late evening feature films is beginning to loosen up the availa- 
bility of 20-second spots in prime time in some of the major tv markets. 

Rep salesmen report there's a mounting preference for the late spots because of: 

1 1 Feature film ratings often are higher than the prime time ratings. 

2) The advertiser gets a full minute for his commercial, whereas in prime time 
he's limited to 20 seconds. Even if the late spot costs twice more than the other, he gets thrice 
the commercial time. 

A BBDO buyer told SPONSOR-SCOPE this week that for the first time in main months 
WCBS TV. CBS' New York flagship, was offering prime spots. He thinks this is a revealing 
tii. off. 

NTA introduces Warner Lambert as first sponsor of its feature films network 

1 April. The deal involves 128 stations, $4 million gross for time and pictures, two-third- 
sponsorship of 20th Century-Fox product, and an estimated 90^ coverage of all tv home-. 

Syndicated and feature film distributors are still overwhelmingly in favor of 
reduced network option time. 

In connection with its film section, page 31, SPONSOR asked the distributors about their 
latest attitudes on option time. 

Of those answering query, 80% wanted a reduction. 15% favored letting things 

alone, and the balance were undecided. 

10 SPONSOR • 2 FEBRUARY 1957 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

^^ 

I— -J 

I Ik- word from General Motors in Detroit in thai the money once used for 
dealer coop advertising doh will !><• dispi nsed bj its zone managers. 

rhe lattei will appoint their own local a which .ill bu; i local rates 

SPONSORSCOPE also learns from GM that: 

• There will be no strict formula governing the handling of tl money. 

• Each GM division still \sill decide how to Bpend the erstwhile co-op allotments. 

• Each zone manager will determine how besl to support his dealers with types ->f 

media, etc. 

Man) agencymen who haw specialized in working with dealer councils think the zone 
managers will favor tv ami radio because: 

Zone managers lake heed of dealer preferences, and dealers have shown a strong hail- 
ing toward the show business. They have Found that a customer is more likelj to mention 
the dealer show he heard last night than the ad he saw the same night's paper. 

Chevrolet has found iv so effective in marketing its products that it will more 
than double the number of one-hour Dinah Shore shows during the 1957-58 

season. 

They are scheduled every other week on NBC, Sunday 9-10 p.m. 

Alcoa and Goodyear meantime will drop out: how NBC will program the alternate 
26 weeks is still undecided. 

Events at \&K within the last two weeks dramatically illustrate how a turn in 
the tv fortunes of an agency can raise hob with billings. 

Around S9 million in Y&R billings evaporated with: 

• The cancellation of Hiram Holliday. only half of the money involved ($2.5 mil- 
lion) is retained through General Food's alternate sponsorship of Wells Fargo. 

• GE's divorcement from the 20th Century-Fox series, a billings loss of $4.5 mil- 
lion. Y&R will share billings on the GE Theatre, thereby reducing the GE tv loss to S2.5 
million. 

• The impending withdrawal of GF from 77th Bengal Lancers ($5 million). 
In 1956 Y&R rolled up $71 million in t\ hillings. 

A western tv station and its rep discovered this week that you can't do busi- 
ness under the counter with P&G. Here's a telescoped version of what happened: 

After the station's rep submitted the under-the-rate-card package deal, an agency buyer 
on the account compared the figures with the published rate. Said the buyer: 

"Look, this won't do! But we'll buy it anywaj at card rate." 

P. S. : Another rep who had been competing for the business heard about the incident 
and demanded of the buyer: "How can you trust that station after such tactics?" 

\~ the industry jj:ets set for an extraor din aril) earl) preview of 1957-53 network tv pro- 
grams next week, giant users of the medium are pretty much in agreement that the 
key figures who will shape the future are the "television strategists." 

Ask them what makes a television strategist especially in agencies, and they reply that [ 

these are the prime qualifications: 

• An ability to advise the client on the most effective use of the medium in all its 
ramifications. 

• A knowledge of how to juggle shows into time periods favorable to the maximum 
kind of audience the advertiser want-. 

• A felicitv for getting the most out of each dollar spent — in spot as well as network. 
What makes such a figure so important? Because in the big agency most of the big 

client's money is spent on tv. 

Among those that admen pick as top tv strategists are: Ben Duffy iBBDO) ; Terry 
Clync (McCann-Erickson) ; Tony Geoghegan (Y&R); Sam Northcross (Esty) ; and 
Dan Seymour I J. Walter Thompson). 

SPONSOR • 2 FEBRUARY 1957 11 




SPONSOR-SCOPE continued . . 

The reps may have a legitimate gripe about the kaleidoscopic ways agencies are using 
NCS#2 to arrive at costs-per-thousand (see page 23), but look at what the Lever Bros, 
agencies have to contend with. Each month they must submit: 

• A report showing the cost-per-thousand of every announcement and network 
program. 

• The ratings of all adjacencies. 

• The audience composition of every Lever announcement and program. 

• An hour by hour analysis of how much time each person spends on the Lever 
account in the agency and the allocation of time to each brand. 

In view of the possibility one brand may have SO spots a month on 100 stations, the size 
of such a statistical job is self-evident. 

Madison Avenue has its eyes open for the blueprint of next fall's schedules 
and shows that NBC TV expects to unveil on 10 February. 

Everything at NBC still is deep in the masterminding stage, and the only comment you 
can get from agencies is this: what comes out may be very helpful to us and our clients; 
we'll wait and see. 

Meantime the four groups working on the overhauling and planning of the 
new program schedules have put out feelers to agencies, such as: Would your clients 
mind buying a half hour of a certain 90 minute show instead of keeping the half-hour shows 
they already have on the air? 

The only big new thing crystalized to dale is converting the Robert Montgomery show 
into something like Playhouse 90, part of it via film. 

Assignments of the four separate NBC TV programing committees are: 

Committee 1 : Finding out the ideal scheduling of the network. 

Committee 2: What to do with the shows NBC has on the air; whether to 
strengthen or reshuffle them. 

Committee 3: What new shows to put on from its live and film show reservoir. 

Committee 4: What's the best time length — 90 minutes, an hour, or what? 

Benton & Bowies' new publicity subsidiary is hardly a welcome colleague to 
the public relations gentry. 

The independent p.r.s grumble that the extensive subsidiaries maintained by JWT, Y&R. 
and McCann-Erickson don't do a broad enough job nor win the confidence of top management. 
The agency p.r. faction counters with these points: 

• Their staffers are constantly on the road, thus maintain a continuing bridge be- 
tween the client and his customers. 

• They can call on specialists to give advice on merchandising and other problems as 
an integral part of the publicity service. 

• By having offices in Chicago and Hollywood they maintain a cross-country liaison 
with editors that's not only comprehensive but of minimum cost to the client. 

(For more details on B&B subsidiary see Agency News Wrap-up, page 62.) 

The large percentage of casualties among network tv kid shows has convinced 
the industry that there's little durability in this type of tv fare. 

The reasons cited for wide margin between today's tv kid shows and the earlier kid 
fare in radio are: 

• In radio most of the kid shows were serials. 

• There's stronger competition for the kid's attention today. 

• Interests are spread over many kinds of programs, hence the kids tire. 
So far the one big exception to the trend is Disneyland. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 5; New 
and Renew, page 57: Spot Buys, page 60; News and Idea Wrap-up, page 62; Washington 
Week, page 69; sponsor Hears, page 72: and Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 76. 

12 SPONSOR • 2 FEBRUARY 1957 




/ 



** 



TONIGHT" from Houston 



NETWORK 
QUALITY 

at the local level! 



r 1 ] 

THE MOST I OTENT ADVE HOUS 





When Steve Allen and cast came to Houston for a "Tonight" telecast 
from the Shamrock Hilton, KPRC-TV provided complete production 
and engineering facilities for the network pick-up The hour and a 
half show was picked up from the hotel lobby, ballroom and outside 
pool by an experienced KPRC-TV staff of 27 men. This experienced 
staff makes "network quality" possible on KPRC-TV from sign-on to 
sign-off. Houston viewers have expressed their appreciation by keeping 
KPRC-TV first in the market for 8 years. Your clients need the station 
that can really sell the market. It's your move. 



KPRC-TV 

HOUSTON 

CHANNEL 2 



JACK HARRIS 

Vice President and General Manager 



JACK McGREW 

National Sales Manager 



Nationally Represented by 
EDWARD PETRY & CO. 




Now Nielsen's NCS#2 Con- 
firms Individual City Ratings. 



Only 




STATIONS 

are POWERFUL enough 

and POPULAR enough 

to cover 

ALL 3 MAJOR MARKETS 

oF Soufhirn California . . . 

LOS ANGELES, SAN DIEGO, 

SAN BERNARDINO. 



Of this top trio 
KBIG is 

V" the only independent 
\/ the least expensive 

V second in cost-per- 
thousand 

V third in total audience 
in Los Angeles, San 
Diego, Orange, San 
Bernardino and 
Riverside counties — 

\/ second in Imperial. 

Any KBIG or Weed man would like 
to show you the documents. 




JOHN POOLE BROADCASTING CO. 

6540 Sunset Blvd.. Los Angeles 28. California 
Telephone Hollywood 3-3205 

Nat. Rep. WEED and Company 






I t 



Timebuyers 
at work 




Lee Oakes, media supervisor. Richard K. Manoff, New York, 
buyer for Humble Bee Tuna and Salmon, comments: "Long before 
media planning, the buyer should have participated in discussions 
which have pinpointed the need for advertising and defined the short- 
term and long-range objectives. The discussions should have 
answered many questions includ- 
ing: Who is the consumer? Where 
is he? How much can be spent 
to reach him? Is the problem 
local, regional, national? Is a new 
and vital story to be developed? 
Must main objectives be met ver\ 
quickK or is this a plan of con- 
sistent advertising which will 
achieve its objective over a long- 
er period of time? Must cop\ 
be varied because of differing lo- 
cal conditions? Is price an im- 
portant consideration to the consumer.'' What about competition, 
if any? Are there main (potential consumers as \et untapped and 
how can they be reached? Onlv when the>e and many other 
questions have been answered and objectives clearly established is 
the buyer readv to begin the evaluation and selection of media 
— and bring to it freshness. creativit\ and analvtical thought.'" 



& 



Dick Tyler, Guild. Bascom & Bonfigli, San Francisco, buyer for 
Ralston Cereals, thinks "timebuyers must get off the seats of their 
pants and get into the field." There is no substitute for first- 
hand knowledge of the market and the onl) wav to get it is through 
travel. Dick says. He points out that "in spite of all our efforts 

to make intelligent buys, we can 
do our best onl) if we have all of 
the available information on hand, 
including market knowledge. Ac- 
tually, it is just as easy to carry 
your abacus in \ our hip pocket 
and bu) v. Idle you're in the mar- 
ket. Clients gain who allow the 
timebuyer this freedom and fle\i- 
bility, because it is often possible 
to make creative and advantageous 
buvs working directlv with the 
stations." \t the same time. Dick 
remarks, the timebuyer is able to contact the advertiser's distribu- 
tor, broker, and sales force to establish good will and enthusiasm 
for the advertising being placed in the territory, a> well as learn 
first hand some of the local sales problems facing the client. 
"Markets are constant!) changing and onl\ timebuyers who have 
observed these changes can produce maximum results for the client. 




SPONSOR 



2 FEBRUARY 195^ 




NEW NAME - From KSWM-TV to KODE-TV. effective 
January 1. 1957. 

NEW MANAGEMENT-Now affiliated with The Friendly Group, 
headed by Jack N. Berkman and John J. Laux of Steubenville, Ohio. 
New Vice President and General Manager is Harry Burke, former 
Vice President and General Manager of KFAB, Omaha, Nebraska. 

HIGHER TOWER - 710 ft. above average terrain — 

22% higher than any other station in KODE's 4-state coverage area. 

HIGHER POWER - 316.000 watts of designed power - 71,000 
watts more than any other station in this growing 4-state market. 
Covering 166.705 TV homes — out of range of "big-city" television. 
% billion dollar income. 



f^S 





HARRY BURKE 



*SS5? 



you'll have more luck ivith 

KODE-TV JOPLIN, MO. CBS-ABC 

FORMERLY KSWM-TV 

Harry Burke, Vice President and General Manager 

A member oj ■•■^"H The Friendly Group 

WSTV-TV & AM, Steubenville, Ohio • WBMS, Boston, Mass. • KODE-TV & AM, Joplin, Mo. • WPIT, Pittsburgh, Penna. 
Rod Gibson, National Sales Manager • 720 Fifth Avenue, New York • JUdson 6-5536 



SPONSOR 



2 FEBRl \K\ 1951 



15 








Know What an 

Open Winter 

Means? 

IN KPQ COUNTRY 

it means the comparatively 
mild winter weather hasn't 
curtailed agricultural opera- 
tions. It means continuing 
wintertime agricultural pay- 
rolls are added to our year 
'round metal industry pay- 
rolls. In a word, it means 
NO LET-UP in business ac- 
tivity in the heart of Wash- 
ington State. 

KPQ Wenatchee alone 
gives complete coverage of 
this important industrial and 
agricultural area of Wash- 
ington. Definitely, our mar- 
ket is captive . . . because 
MILES AND MOUN- 
TAINS separate us from 
other Washington cities. 

We Guarantee to out- 
pull all other North 
Central Washington 
media 



2 to I 





5000 
II 

WENAfHE 
WASHINGTON 

PORTLAND & SEATTLE REPS 
Art Moore and Associates 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

Forjoe and Co., Incorporated 

(One of the Big 6 Forjoe Represented 
Stations of Washington State) 



16 



by Bob Foreman 



Agency ad libs 




Corporate funds used for tv sponsorship 

Back in the days when the biggest line-up of 
tv stations a network could deliver cost around 
$6,000 and the Ed Sullivan program was avail- 
able at a talent cost of .$8,000, product-sponsor- 
ship was a comparatively uninvolved thing. You 
paid your money, supplied your commercials, 
and perhaps wondered if this device that vou 
watched wrestling on would ever become na- 
tional; also if it would ever settle down into a stable advertising 
medium. 

Time passed and many dollars did too. Costs rose and rose 
again. Comics who hadn't been able to get work on a Saturday 
morning sustainer in radio became household epithets. Emcee's 
whose last booking had been in New Jersey roadhouses were front 
page copy in competitive ad media. And the most sedate of ad 
agencies found that suede shoes were de rigueur. 

The above is called evolution. 



Rising costs require new dollar sources 

But to get to the point of this tract. As costs rose hysterically, 
new burdens were imposed upon harassed advertising managers. 
Despite the fact that their budgets had probably grown too, these 
budgets could not keep pace with the demands of tv. Taking monev 
from other media — notably from radio first — solved the problem 
only for awhile. Next came split sponsorship, splintered program- 
ing, magazine concepts, and other budget-buys. But it still wasn't 
enough. Which brings us up to the present. 

A number of large business concerns, usually those which sell 
the higher-price-tag items (or to put it another w T ay, not the makers 
of fast-turnover items) had to devise new ways to support their 
tv shows. New budget techniques. New corporate sources of dollars 
and new methods of bookkeeping them. It is entirely possible that 
these efforts, in the minds of some of the company's officers, are 
considered as legerdemain: certain to cause financial rock "n ruin. 
Today, however, as more and more of the facts come in, we find 
fewer and fewer reasons for alarm. Here's how it works! 

Companv X makes wallboard, carpeting, paint, machine tools, and 
industrial cartons of all types. They had supported a modest tv 
opus — Bert Bixby and his Bubbling Five — from the first days of 
l\ where he I Bert ) started with a local show. Bert was still there 
the da\ they hooked up the first network. t\ ing Schenectady and 
New York City . 

But somewhere along the line Companv X outgrew Bert. A 



SPONSOR 



2 FEBRIARY 1957 




SaAL.7^aAazLsGaAi^s gajl sotd cnc KRON-TV 



BUGS BUNNY 
PRESENTS 

Mon.-Fri. 5:45-6:20 

AVAILABLE 



S.F. CHRONICLE . NBC AFFILIATE . CHANNEL 4 . PETERS, GRI FFI N . WOODWARD 



SPONSOR • 2 FEBRUARY 1957 



17 



ikuM 





970 KC 
TULSA, OKL£ 

TULSA'S ONLY 

24-HOUR 
MUSIC & NEWS 

STATION 

TULSA'S No. 1 STATION 
TULSA S No. 1BUY 




ff 



KAKC No. 1 

COVERING THE 
OIL CAPITAL OF 
I THE WORLD! 

HOOPER-RATING 

OCT. 1956 

TIME STATIONS 

KAKC A B c D E 

MONDAY FRIDAY O <* c ..„««.«- 

12 Noon 6 PM ^J-0 12-3* 6.5 19.9 15.8 17.2 

MONDAY-FRIDAY OC7 „ ., ..,..„.... 
7 AM-12 Noon OD./ 13.8* 4.8 14.5 17.4 13.1 

10 S aJms*PM 45.1 12.8* 3.6 12.7 11.0 13.3 

10*™° PM 30.8 10.4* 14.4 11.6 8.6 23.7 

6 S PM:'ii"m 40.8 5 3 19.5 15.0 16.5 

'MEASUREMENT ADJUSTED TO COMPENSATE FOR 
5:45 P. M. SIGN-OFF OF STATION A. 



BULLETIN! 



PULSE CONFIRMS* IT!!! 

Pulse Inc. also proves the new. 

KAKC is No. 1 in Tulsa 



JOHN H. PACE, Exec. V.P. & Gen. Mgr. 

AMERICAN AIRLINES BLDG.-Tulsa. Okla. 

Telephone LU 7-2401 

Representatives: 

NATIONAL: Richard O'Connell, Inc. 
SOUTH: Clarke Brown Co. 
WEST COAST: Tracy Moore 



I 



Agency ad libs continued, 



dramatic show was started. All along the Carpet Division had 
footed the bill. And things went along nicely. But following the 
Schenectady and New York link-up came myriads of other cities. 
The producer-director of the Company X Playhouse was joined bv 
a hosl of liis relatives. Finally the carpeting sales manager threw 
up his hands and said he couldn't pay the bill for next \ ear's 
drama series, despite the fact he had diverted all his print money 
to it (except for a single quarter page in the special Samoan issue of 
National Geographic so his children could keep their subscription!. 
Moaned the Carpet Sales Manager to the Corporate Ad Manager, 
"Neither can I afford to give the thing up. All my competitors plus 
the smooth surface boys are moving in! The trade will give me the 
works if I pull out!" 

Tv sponsorship plugs the company name as well as products 

The Ad Manager thought about it all that night — and next 
morning he had a plan. He reasoned thusly: we now are without 
the services of Bert Bixby and have a show of some qualitv. It gets 
good notices, the wives of the directors watch and approve. Here 
and there the company president gets a letter from the presidents 
office of a good customer stating, "I saw vour show last night and 
enjoyed it!" This gives me my approach. 

So next day the Ad Manager went directly to his companv 
president. He showed stats of the important mail the show had 
received. He read him Trade-Talk excerpts. He outlined what 
collateral (other than carpet-selling) benefits the company had been 
reaping (including a stock price increase of 27% I. And then he 
put the bite on him: 

"By George, the Company itself ought to pay for these things." 

''What do you mean by that?", thundered Prexy. "Who's pa\ing 

9" 

now . 

'"Just the Carpet Division," said Ad Manager. "Let's look at our 
Main Title!" 

" \\ hats that?", asked our president. 

"In the 45 second film at the beginning of Company X Playhouse, 
we mention that we not only make soft goods (carpets) but that 
our concern is helping American industn park better products, the 
American farmer with machinery, the American builder and home- 
owner with the finest paints ever made, etc. Now look at these 
charts, sir." 

Ad Manager took out his secret weapon. \ series of Awareness 
Graphs that he'd been making month by month ever since the 
Pla\ house went on with the new main title. The little red bars 
showed a lovely upward progression of awareness in the public 
mind that Corporation \ was involved in many diversified fields — 
helping industry, farmers, consumers, et al. 

it was a short meeting. Bul VI Manager came away with 3 » > ' « 
of his t\ program to i >e supported by corporate funds. Secretiy, 
both he ami the President realized that well over 30% of the 
show's benefits were corporate and not just rug profits. ^ 



18 



SPONSOR 



2 FEBRUARY 1957 




\ 



KNOWLEDGE 

Knowledge and speed guide the sur- 
geon's hand. 

In our fast-moving field, too, knowledge- 
able decisions frequently must be made 
quickly. 

That's why . . . when we give you facts 
. . . we're careful to make them accurate, 
complete and pertinent. And, whenever 
possible, get them to you fast while they 
still have meaning and application. 

AVERY-KNODEL 

INCORPORATED 



NEW YORK ATLANTA DALLAS DETROIT SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES CHICAGO 



in 1956 

300 ADVERTISERS 

discovered that . . . 

when you 

TELL THEM 
IN SPANISH 

you 

SELL 
THEM! 

« 

Make the 573,000 
Spanish-Speaking 
Prospects in Metro- 
politan Los Angeles 
YOUR CUSTOMERS 



Listening Surveys and 
Market Studies Available 




AROUND-THE-CLOCK 
SPANISH PROGRAMS 

L.A.— RYan 1-6744 
S.F. — Broadcast Time Sales 




49th and 
Madison 



RCA's super salesman 
Thank you very much for the kind 
words about Vaughn Monroe as the 
super salesman for RCA (Sponsor 
Backstage, 12 Januan I. 

Monroe was initially asked to do 
commercials for the first of the RCA 
sponsored tv shows. From this de- 
veloped the idea of his role as the 
travelling RCA ambassador of good 
will. Since 1947 Vaughn has made 
personal appearances in some 70 mar- 
kets for all product divisions of RCA. 

I sent truckloads of the January 
12th issue to RCA, Camden and New 
York. The column was bracketed — so 
thanks for noting his commercial tag 
and the fine job he is doing. 

John Tassos. promotion department 

Ken- on & Eckhardt. J\ew York 



Audience reaction to tv commercials 
I think your readers will be interested 
in knowing that the National Audience 
Board received requests from civic 
organizations in 41 states for over 
46,000 ballots in connection with our 
survey of tv commercials ( run the 
week of November 26 I . 

The survey is an attempt to crystal- 
ize public opinion — what people like 
and dislike individually — about tv 
commercials, through a list of 10 ques- 
tions rating the commercial. 

The results of the survey are now 
being tabulated and we have been 
greatly encouraged by the high scores 
received by the messages of obviously 
reputable companies compared to the 
scores awarded to somewhat dubious 



commercials. We feel this large 
sample, registering both favorable and 
unfavorable reactions will disclose 
much valuable information which will 
be published in our newsletter. 

\\ e deeply appreciate the analysis 
cil I he ballot made by Ed Cooper of 
SPONSOR, which is largely responsible 
for our decision to keep publication of 
results under close control until the 
results can be properly interpreted. 

Peter Goelet, president 

\ational Audience Hoard. Inc. N. Y. 



AMST techniques demonstrated 
The Board of Directors of the Asso- 
ciation of Maximum Service Tele- 
casters met Januar\ 17. in Washing- 
ton. While there, we showed several 
members of the FCC and various ether 
officials in \\ ashington the two new 
units which AMST is putting on the 
road for the purpose of doing some 
technical studies of measurement. 

Attached is a photograph which I 
thought your readers would enjoy 
seeing. Included in the demonstration 
l although not all shown I are: Don 
Creswell, Engineer; Carl Davis, Engi- 
neer; Howard Head, Engineering Con- 
sultant: Edward W. Allen, Jr.. FCC; 
Harry Fine. FCC: Edward W. Chapin, 
FCC; Robert D. Swezey, WDSU-TV; 
Ken Carter, WAAM-TV; A. D. Ring, 
Engineering Consultant: Thomas E. 
Howard. WBTV; Donald Davis, 
KMBC-TV: David Baltimore. WBRE; 
Jack Harris. KPRC-TV i AMST Presi- 
dent i : Nicholas Zapple. Senate Inter- 
slate and Foreign Commerce Commit- 






20 




Members of the Association of Maximum Service Telecasters inspect new survey unit 



SPONSOR • 2 FEBRUARY 1957 



tee; Harold Stuart, K\ A ; I d 

uaul I . Kenehan, FCC; W arren I 
Baker, I < I !; Kurt Borchardt, House 
Interstate and Foreign Commerce Com- 
mittet-; Harold Cm-. \\ JIM-TV: Hail 
S i owperthwait, FCC; Lester W. Lin- 
dow, Executive Director, \MST; and 
Ja.k DeWitt, WSM-TV. 

John S. Hayes, president, I lie H (Isl- 
ington Post Broadcast Division, 
11 ashington, I). C. 

Listing of major advertisers 

I'll certainl) go along with Mr. Cald- 
well of \\ WE. Louisville, in the sug- 
gestion of an alphabetical listing of 
advertisers i-rc 1* >t 1 1 \ Madison 19 
January ». 

As things now -land in our office, 
were always confronted with the prob- 
lem of "where to look." At the present 
time, we're using a sponsor reprint 
from 1955 - "Timebuyers of the 
United States" as our source of ad- 
dresses and advertisers. However, this 
i- li\ agencies, which is confusing 
when looking for a certain account 
timebuyer when the agency is un- 
known. 

So. let this be our vote for an alpha- 
betical listing of major advertisers, the 
brand name breakdown suggested l>\ 
Mr. Caldwell, and the agency and 
timebuyer for EACH PRODUCT of 
that company. 

Our thanks to sponsor for the past 
good work. Keep it up! 

Don Kirkpatrick, promotion dir. 
KOSA-TV, Odessa, Texas 

• This monumental job nifgefted bj reader Cald- 
wi-ll anil >*'ci>mlrtl b> miller Kirkpatrick ia now 
mi. I. r consideration as a futiir.- SI'ONSOR project. 

The long look at 15% 
So far, most of the current discussion 
about agency compensation has been 
coming from advertisers, leaving un- 
explored a great many pertinent issues 
from the agency's point of view. 

Perhaps this is why Marion Har- 
per's statement on the subject, before 
the A.N. A. last month, has met with 
the response it has, particularly in the 
number of requests for copies from 
agency people. 

It struck me that \our readers might 
be interested in having extra copies of 
the full text. 

Anthony Hyde, vice-president 
planning and development 
McCann-Erickson, New York 

• Marion Harper's statement. entitled "The 
K.»ol»iii« Functions of the Modern Advertising 
Agency." may be obtained by writing directly to 
McCann-Friikson. t85 Lexington avenue, Nan 
York. 



SPONSOR • 2 FEBRUARY 1957 



ONLY KV00-RADI0 BLANKETS 
OKLAHOMA'S NO. 1 MARKET 




ACCORDING TO THE 
1956 NEILSEN REPORT 



53.6% DEPEND ON KVOO 



O 



r Best 



to 



Our 



"Rep's" 



& CO. 




so'V 



Why not take ALL of Oklahoma's No. 
1 market . . . The Billion Dollar Em- 
pire! In all the 5 I counties in KVOO's 
.05 MV/M area . . . 53.6 per cent of 
the people depend on KVOO. That's 
dominance and the door to your sales. 
Schedule KVOO-RADIO NOW", for 
lowest cost per prospect — highest re- 
turn per dollar. Call your Petry Radio 
man. 

Harold C. Stuart. Exei I P. 
Gustav Brandborg, Gen'l 




RADIO 



50.000 WATTS • 1170 KC • OKLAHOMA'S GREATEST STATION 



21 




WTIX FIRST 

IN AUDIENCE BY 

WIDE MARGIN* 



WTIX 

Station 
Station 
Station 
Station 
Station 
Station 
Station 
Station 
Station 

*Hooptr, 
Slort.-Fri. 



22.6% 

. 12.2% 

. 10.6% 

. 10.3% 

. 9.6% 

. 9.4% 

. 9.2% 

. 6.1% 

. 5.6% 

. 4.8% 



a.m.-6 p.m. 
tfov.-Vec. 1956. 



.Month after month after month WTIX maintains or widens its convincing 
number one audience position in this 11-station market. This leader- 
ship extends to a quarter-hour count, too. Of 220 weekly quarter hours, 
170 belong to WTIX. which also has 40 second-place quarters, 10 thirds . . . 
and not a single one lower! 

And wait, jnst wait until yon sec tin latest Pulse — and you'll see 
the tremendous effect of Storz Station programming quality on 
New Orleans radio listening, (let the detailed "figures that leave 
no doubt" from Adam Young, or WTIX General Manager 
FRED BERTHELSON. 



WTIX 



first in audiena in NEW ORLEANS 





Today's Radio for Today's Selling 



TODD STORZ, 

President 



WDGY 
Minneapolis-St. Paul 



WHB 
Kansas City 



WQAM 

Miami 



Represented by John Blair & Co. 



KOWH 

Omaha 



WTIX 

New Orleans 



Represented by Adam Young Inc. 



22 



SPONSOR • 2 FEBRUARY 1957 



S RO NSOR 

2 FEBRUARY 10B7 



SRA formula uses NCS data to project ratings 




T^ 






•/./tove^f"^' 



I 




NCS NO. 2 

COVERAGE 

MUDDLE 

Problem lies in different ways agencies are using NCS — 2 data, 
which threaten to block communications between buyers and sellers of time 



I his week the radio-t\ committee «>t the IA's met 
with members of SR V to discuss a problem that is 
blocking communications between buyers and sellers 
of time: How NCS#2 is to be used. 

On everj count, \C.S = 2 has heroine a smorgas- 
bord of rich data from which agencies and rep se- 
lect the morsels to >nit their particular taste. 

As everyone knows, NCS#2 was intended to: 

1 I Give a reliable count of total radio and t\ 
homes in the I .S. on a county-by-countj basis. 

2) Serve a- an industry-wide coverage measure 
financed by station, rep. and agenc) subscribers. 

Define station coverage in terms of actual audi- 
ence reached h\ a station and show the extent of the 



audience for individual programing I when combined 
with program ratings). 

What has caused the confusion are these view- 
points: 

• Whether \( " — _' is a coverage survey or a 
circulation and "popularity" index. A change 
in a station's programing format sim e the time the 
\( S survey was made could mean a different pattern 
in audience circulation. | In t\ a change in network 
affiliation could have such an effect. In radio, where 
circulation patterns are less concentric and more ir- 
regular, changes in local programing, in competitive 
factors can have a similar eh' 

Therefore, the media research men at various 



SPONSOR 



2 FEBRl ARY 10.T, 



23 



Broadcast industry and agencies are seeking 

a common ground for using NCS#2 data to find 

total program audience. SRA formula may be answer 



agencies are working out instructions 
for the buyers taking other factors in- 
to consideration in evaluating stations 
for particular campaigns. Necessarily, 
these instructions can and do vary not 
only from agency to agency, but 
often from one campaign to the next. 

• Where to cut off for "effect 
coverage." Nielsen executives sug- 
gest consideration for counties or coun- 
ty clusters with 10% penetration and 
above. The reps, of course, feel that 
all areas where a station has any pene- 
tration should be considered in evalu- 
ating total coverage, particularly in 
radio. Agency media researchers are 
in the process of formulating tv pat- 
terns, but most of the research experts 
at major agencies are still far from 
developing a workable pattern for in- 
terpreting radio figures. 

"Partly because of the physical char- 



acteristics of the radio signal and 
partly because of the potential radio 
audience's more sensitive reaction to 
outside influences (tv competition, 
programing factors), the circulation 
patterns for each station tend to be 
spotty," says the media research head 
of one of the top 10 agencies. "Clear- 
channel stations present a particular 
problem. They might have 40% to 
60% penetration in the home coun- 
ties, drop off to 10% or less in coun- 
ties next to the home area, and then 
pick up 50% and more of the audience 
in far-flung counties of neighboring 
states." 

Therefore, the client's individual 
needs are a major factor in determin- 
ing the interpretation of the figures. 
Here are two examples of campaigns 
requiring different interpretations: 



lllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllM 

Here's how the SRA formula works: 

Hypothetical case: A local half-hour show on station KXXX 
has a 10 ARB rating. The timebuyer wants to determine what size 
total audience this program on KXXX delivers, using NCS#2. 

NCS#2 data: In the ARB-rated counties, station KXXX has 
50% penetration on a weekly basis. These counties have 100,000 
set homes. In KXXX's secondary coverage area, there are also 
100,000 set homes, and KXXX has 25% weekly circulation. In the 
outer rim of the station's coverage, there are 100,000 more set 
homes, and KXXX reaches 10% of these according to NCS#2. 

Method: Add the actual homes reached on a weekly basis. In 
other words, add 50,000 from the home county (50% penetration 
times total set homes) to 25,000 in the secondary area (25% pene- 
tration times total set homes in secondary area) plus 10,000 (10% 
penetration times total set homes in outer rim area) . Divide 
85,000 (total audience reached by KXXX on weekly basis) by 
50% (penetration in rated counties). Then apply the 10 ARB 
rating to the result of the previous operation, which is 170,000. 

Result: A half-hour show on with a 10 ARB rating reaches 
17,000 homes. This method of figuring is considered valid by SRA 
whether the buyer uses weekly or monthly figures. Of course, 
he should use daytime or nighttime figures depending on the show. 



1. A small-budget national spot ra- 
dio advertiser wants to buy a 13-week 
or longer campaign to reach a maxi- 
mum audience. His buyer will be 
more likely to use weekly or even 
monthly circulation figures and credit 
each station with audiences in remote 
areas where penetration is adequate. 

2. If an advertiser is buying short 
flurries of daytime saturations for lo- 
cal impact, the buyer is likely to evalu- 
ate NCS#2 far more restrictively. 
He'll probably base his coverage data 
on daily or weekly daytime circu- 
lation and restrict station credit to the 
area where a locally-slanted commer- 
cial is likely to be effective. 

"In preparing a coverage map for a 
client, you can run a danger bv includ- 
ing the 10% or even 20% circulation 
areas," says the media research direc- 
tor of an agency heavy in spot radio 
accounts. "You're assuring the client 
that he has adequate coverage, but 
you may be swamped with complaints 
from dealers in the 10% or 20% cov- 
erage areas. If you're dealing with 
coop budgets, you can face a nasty 
dealer problem by interpreting the 
figures too liberally." 

• How to compute cost-per- 
1,000. Until each agency determines 
cut-off points and interpretation of 
NCS data, particularly in radio, cost- 
per-1,000 figures are virtually mean- 
ingless. Therefore, the single hottest 
aspect of the NCS#2 muddle is the 
variety of ways ratings are being pro- 
jected, since rating services measure 
only an inner area of station coverage. 
Reps realize that it's difficult to stand- 
ardize interpretations of coverage for 
station comparisons. But a uniform 
formula for projecting ratings can be 
and has been worked out by SRA. 

On 24 January, a group of nine top 
broadcast and agency executives met in 
Adam Young's office for an informal 
luncheon discussion to see whether 
this SRA formula could become the 
standard. Attending were Ken God- 
frey, 4A's v.p. ; Frank Silvernail, 
BBDO director of station relations and 
head of the 4A's radio-tv committee; 
"Teddy" Anderson, BBDO radio-tv re- 
search director; Larry Webb, SRA 
managing director; Bill Crumley, 
Adam Young tv research director; 
Frank Boehm, Adam Young radio re- 
search director; Ward Dorrell, Blair 



24 



SPONSOR 



2 FEBRUARY 1957 




SRA's formula for determining total program audience based on NCS#2 was discussed .it informal luncb meeting 
week. Attending were (L to r.i Lawrence Welti). SH \ managing director; Ken Godfrey, 1 \'s v.p.; Frank Silvernail, 
HHDO station relations director, head of I V- radio-tv committee; Teddy Anderson, BBDO radio-tt research director; 
Ward Dorrell, v.p. of research, Blair; Frank Boehm, director of radio research. Adam Young; Dan Dennenholz. 
director of research, Katz; Hill I rumlev. .lirector of tv research, \ilam ^ oung. ' \dam Young, not pictured, gave luncheon.) 



research director: Dan Dennenholz, 
Kat/ research director; and Adam 
} oung, president of the rep firm. 

What the reps and stations are try- 
ing to prevent through use of the 
standard formula is a "prorating of 
ratings"' — taking a percentage of a per- 
cent and thus shortchanging a station 
and inflating tlie cost-per-1,000 for lo- 
cal announcement or program lui\s. 
In other words, thej say that ratings 
should he applied to "adjusted*' total 
home figures, not to station circulation 
figures. 

Here's just a sampling of the vari- 
ous ways agencies might project rat- 
ings: 

1. Arbitrary cut-off method: Agen- 
cies using this system project the rat- 
ing against the total number of set 
homes within onlv those counties hav- 
ing a minimum penetration of 50',' 
or 10', or 30%. The danger of this 
method is the fact that it arbitrarily 
discounts the aggregate audience 
reached in all the counties with pene- 



tration under the fixed cut-off point. 
2. Ratio in rated counties: One 
agency is already applying this meth- 
od to tv ratings. (Its formula for ra- 
dio is not yet worked out.) Here's 
how it works: The agencv establishes 
the ratio between homes reached week- 
ly by a station and total tv homes in 
the rated counties and applies this ra- 
tio to total homes reached weekl) b) 
that station. However, this method 
tends to discriminate against the 
strong station in a multi-station mar- 
ket, where the ratio between its view- 
ing audience and total audience in the 



r 



ARTICLE IN BRIEF 



While agency media researchers seek 
formulae for using NCS -2 data, reps 
and buyers are talking at cross-pur- 
poses. Major problem involves pro- 
jecting program ratings to total 
program audience. 4A's plans dis- 
cussion of SRA formula for ratings. 



home count) might be far lower than 
in its less competitive outlying coun- 
ties. 

The SRA formula credits a station 
with every home reached. Basically, 
it is this: SRA suggests that agencies 
take the total audience reached week- 
ly i based on NCS#2i. divide it b) 
percent of home count] penetration 
and apphj the rating to the result. 

\\ hether this formula will become 
generally adopted by the agencies or 
not, one prospect looms large on the 
immediate horizon: Reps and agen- 
cies both face main week- of discus- 
sion on the subject, before a clear-cut 
solution can he arrived at. 

It becomes more and more apparent 
that radio coverage interpretations 
present an entire!] different and more 
complex prohlem than interpretation 
of the tv data. Therefore, it may well 
take longer until the agencies decide 
how thej will use the M S#2 luures 
on radio. The important thing is for 
agencies to tell reps their formula. ^ 



SPONSOR 



2 FKBRl ARY 195' 



25 



DAN RIVER WEAVES TV IIS 

How a 75-year-old textile manufacturing firm revised media 
thinking to become a pioneer user of tv for selling soft goods 




"The cost of tv makes even experi- 
mentation, impossible, says A. W. Bar- 
ber advertising and sales promotion 
manager' oj Dan River Mills, textile 
manufacturer. It cant see any way of 
lilting television into a 10' < higher 
L956 budget." — From an article in the 
Wall Street Journal, 26 October 1956. 

I he appearance in print, noted bv 
Bob Williams, of CBS Spot Tv Sales, 
had the effect of a red flag on a bull. 



At a CBS war council, a presentation 
was prepared. There followed, as 
Barber puts it, "an effective barrage of 
calls, letters, service, good salesman- 
ship, good luncheons and dry mar- 
tinis." Barber succumbed. The chain 
reaction touched off by the Journal's 
quote resulted in Dan River Mills 
fitting television into its 1956 budget 
after all. And they'll be back in '57. 
The 1956 campaign began in Julv 
and ran in 10 markets: Boston, New 
York, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Dallas, 



Chicago, St. Louis, Cleveland. San 
Francisco, and Los Angeles. A total 
of 15 locally-produced personality 
shows were used and participations 
averaged out at five a week for six 
weeks. The cost of the campaign was 
about S60.000. 

This year, two spot tv campaigns 
are planned 1>\ Dan River to lend im- 
pact to the two peak selling periods of 
the fabric business, spring and fall. 
Their total cost will come to about 
$100,000. Being a cotton house, Dan 



Fabricometer: New fabric tester is examined by A. W. Barber (right), ad director of Dan River Mill- and 
Ralph Axthelm (left), account supervisor at Grey Advertising. Dan River personalities "Twin Wonder Twins" look on 






^ 



r *' ' 




4 



v fl JL/VN LXf\\ A/'ir/,,, 



*/* 




S*wvSZ 



B# • • 




3 BUDG 





"Twin Wonders:" ( '" the same show, 
rrippe twins were introduced as pari "t a 
miniature Fashion show. Last year's Dan 

Rivei -p"t i\ i unpaign used l"> such -linn- 



Interview: ''•in River's ad director, \ 
\V. Barber, explains "Twin Wonder" cotton 
process to Virginia Graham on her i\ show on 
\\ \HD. New York. Shows were in LOmarkets 




Demonstration: Barbel demonstrates 
Eabrii properties while Virginia Graham 
lalk- to twins. Participations in I 
personality shows was the ti 






Eliver \lill> will put more emphasis on 
tin- — |»i irii_i season since it traditional!) 
tops autumn in cotton sales. Plans, in 
general, include the same markets as 
were used last year, hut must remain 
flexible to allow for show or local 
personality changes. 

I Kcepl for yard goods, sheets and 
pillow-cases which are sold direct to 
retailers, Dan River Mills is three 
markets removed from the ultimate 
consumer. It manufactures fabrics 
which are sold to apparel manufac- 
turers, who then st\le them into 
dresses, sportswear, shirts, work clothes 
and outerwear. They, in turn, sell 
them to the retailer, and so the finished 
product finalh reaches the consumer. 
The retailer is the pivot in selling soft 
goods. Dan River advertising and pro- 
motional strategy is to sell him, since 
he is its customer's customer. Coinci- 
dent with last year's spot t\ campaign, 
retailers increased use of the Dan 
River brand name in their own store 
advertising. 

The Dan River account is handled 
b) Grej Advertising Agency, and is 
serviced by Ralph Axthelm. account 
supervisor; Harold Newman, account 
executive: Tom Reilly. media buyer, 
and Rob Kirschbaum, copy head. In 
the New York office of Dan River 



Mill-. Advertising and Sales Promo- 
tion Director Barber is assisted b) 
Trudj Taylor. Before the launching 
of la-t year's spol tv campaign. Bar- 
ber. Axthelm, Newman and Trud) 
[aylor fanned out across the countr\ 
to call on each station and hrief the 
personalities on their shows. They sup- 
plied each show with a kit containing 
three 30-second film commercials, fact 
sheets, commercial copy, retail pro- 
motion material-, garments and props. 
Once briefed, the personalities were 
allowed complete freedom in deliver- 
ing their announcements. The use of 
the film commercials was optional. 
Meanwhile Dan River salesmen alerted 
apparel manufacturers for the up-com- 
ing campaign, and thev passed the 
word along to retailers. Retailers then 
went to work to promote the show- at 
the local level, cooperated with stations 



ARTICLE IN BRIEF 

It began with a quote in a financial 
paper regarding the "prohibitive cost" 
of tv for Dan River Mills, a leading 
textile manufacturer. It resulted in 
a 560,000 spot television campaign in 
10 major markets last year, and plans 
for two similar spot tv drives in 1957. 



in the supplying of dresses for models. 

The markets used were -elected he- 
cause thev were the I 11 top ones in re- 
tail fabric -ales within which Dan 
River Mill- had local offices. The 
salesmen in these local offices acted as 
-how monitors on t\ sets rented or 
supplied In stations. 

The annual Dan River ad budget 
i including media and all promotional 
efforts I stands at slightly more than 

>l million. Of this, about >~>7~>. 

goes into consumer media. National 
magazines get about four-fifths of this, 
since the backbone of fabric advertis- 
ing is color. The remaining fifth that 
now goes to tv i- for impact at the 
local level during peak sales periods. 

Dan Eliver Mill-, in Danville, \ a.. 
is the largest integrated cotton mill in 
the world with an annual capacity of 
200 million yards of fabric. I'hi- \ear 
it celebrate- it- 75th anniversary. 

In recent \ears. Dan River — in a 
program to expand facilities and 
diversify into such lines as upholstery, 
towelings and industrial fabrics —has 
acquired mills in the Carolina-. Ua- 
bama. Mississippi and Georgia as well 
,i- a commission and banking house in 
New York ( it\. >ince then, net an- 
nual sales are running in the neighbor- 
hood of $200 million. ^ 



SPONSOR 



2 KKBRl'ARY 195' 



27 



McCANN GEARS FOR $100 MILLION 



■ — 1 


i. .. _ 






V 


Stairs 








Prt. 
Elev. 


■ 





l8tn floor 



(Studio 1) 




(Studio k) 



(Prop Room) 






(Projection Room) 



(Studio 2) 



(Studio 3) 



|(tv & 

I Sound 

Control 
i Room) 



(Plla Cut- 
ting & 
Storage F 





Communications between agency divisions are easier, more 
efficient in McCann's new 485 Lexington home offices. The media 
department, which had been housed in separate building, will 
now be near research, client services and programing departments. 



Blueprint above shows section of tv-radio programing division's 
floor, including large live studio facilities, viewing rooms with 
seating capacities ranging from 20 to 70. Closed-circuit tv makes 
it possible for program executives to monitor rehearsals in office. 



w 



hen Ringling Bros, moves a show 
of a few hundred people, it can count 
on at least two hundred spectators to 
crowd about and attempt getting in 
the way. For a multi-million corpora- 
tion to strike its tents and move its 
staff could easily turn out to be a 
time- and money-consuming three-ring 
circus. 

Last week some 1,300 members of 
McCann-Erickson's home office in New 
\ ork cleared their desks and files, 
packed up their office belongings, and, 
over a span of five days they call 
"The Big Move," transferred kit and 
caboodle from 50 Rockefeller Plaza to 
the agency's new headquarters at 485 
Lexington Avenue. The move ^\as 
effected on a department-by-depart- 
ment basis over a period of one week, 
with less than a two-hour working time 
loss per department in the process. 



Behind "The Big Move" is the story 
of one agency's phenomenal growth 
within a short span of years ($25 mil- 
lion in 1953 air billings to an esti- 
mated S100 million tv-radio in 1957). 
To put it bluntly, by end of 1955, 
McCann-Erickson was "bustin' its 
seams" from its rapid expansion. 

"The Big Move," which entered 
planning stages well over one year 



ARTICLE IN BRIEF 

McCann-Erickson's phenomenal growth 
has required a major move to larger 
quarters, and a streamlining of its 
media and tv-radio programing serv- 
ices divisions. The actual move to 485 
Lexington was effected in one week, 
required year of planning, organizing. 



ago, entails far more than the physical 
hoisting of men, women and office 
paraphernalia some seven or eight 
blocks cross-town to more spacious 
housing facilities. It's also the physical 
by-product of some top-level manage- 
ment thinking about streamlining or- 
ganization and communications within 
a giant modern-day agency. 

\^ hen McCann's professional ser- 
vices division (a management consult- 
ing operation I began tackling the 
problem of "The Big Move" many 
months ago, one of the major ques- 
tions it faced was: "How can the 
agency operate most economically and 
efficiently in the handling of near- 
$100 million in tv and radio billings 
alone?" 

The answer lies in certain organiza- 
tional changes and streamlining with- 
in the tv-radio programing services 



28 



SPONSOR 



2 FEBRUARY 1957 



irU RADIO-TV 



Moving to large. neM offices i- resull of one \*<ir 



planning, including streamlined reorganization of tv-radio operations. 
Here's how McCann's media and tv-radio programing departments work 





Radio-tv programing, under v.p. 
George Haighl > ai row ' is n. >w divided 
into three departments for effii iencj : 
client services, operations, production 



Media, under v.p. Bill Dekker (1), was among Srsl to 
mow in new home office-. Rill Pellenz (with hat) is 
broadcast supervisoi in one of agency's ti\'- product 
media groups, each of which i- assigned clients 



division and within the media depart- 
ments of ilif agency, and affects some 
61 and 127 people re-pecti\rl\ . 

Heir- how these departments air 
set up and the reasons-why: 

Tv-radio programing services </iii- 
sion: This division "I the agenc) is 
responsible For the producing <>r co- 
producing and buying of programing 
lo he aired either on network or to be 
placed on a -pot l>a>i>. It doe- not 
handle radio or t\ commercials. ITiese 
an- written and produeed within the 
agency's creative division. 

"W.-rt- splil this \\a\ because man- 
agement feels that the function- of the 
two department- are different." says 
George Haight, v.p. and manager of 
tv-radio programing services. "One's 
to fill the hall, the other to sell the 
medicine." 

The (>1 people concerned with the 



"hall-fillin' " function are represented 
<>n the agencj s administrative council 
l>\ Tern Clyne, v.p. in charge of t\ 
and radio. The commercials writing 
and producing department i- repre- 
sented In Jack Tinker, v.p. and crea- 
tive director. 

The biggest reorganization ha- been 
effected on the top executive level 
within the tv-radio programing depart- 
ment, which i- headed up In George 
Hai-ht. 

"I u-ed to ha\e 11 people reporting 
to me directly," ^a\s Haight. "This 
meant that I was virtually alwavs knee- 
deep in administrative and supervisor] 
detail. Now I've pot three separate 
departments under me. and therefore 
onl\ three people reporting to me. This 
frees me considerably for the most 
important creative function of scout- 
ing out -how-, talent and scripts." 

George Haight, M'- of tv-radio pro. 
graining services, surveys new offices. Fa- 
cilities will include four projection rooms, 
closed-circuit t\ hook-up to all three nets 




McCANN lonlinued . . . 

The three departments are ( 1 ) client 
services, (2) operations, (3) produc- 
tion. For the moment, Haight also 
doubles as head of the client services 
department, but he anticipates a time 
in the near future when a director of 
client services will head this depart- 
ment. The three associate directors of 
client services (within the tv-radio 
programing services division) are Ted 
Bergmann and Lance Lindquist in 
Mew York and Neil Reagan in Los 
Angeles. 

"Each of these associate directors 
has a staff of tv-radio account execu- 
tives under him who attend the prod- 
uct group meetings of the accounts 
assigned to them," says Haight. "Their 
job is media, client, research and 
creative liaison. One might work on 
Nestle, another on Chrysler, another 
on Westinghouse." 

The operations department, under 
Frank Gilday, director of operations, 
handles such legal aspects of the busi- 
ness as AFTRA or other union deal- 
ings, checks contracts with producers. 
This department also handles the for- 
warding of film shows to stations and 
the routing of films. 

The production department is 
headed by Mary Harris, who, inci- 
dentally, is the only woman to hold a 
top-level creative post in tv-radio pro- 
graming among any of the top 30 
agencies. Reporting to her are two 
production supervisors in New York 
and two in Los Angeles. 

"This department is purposely 
staffed not with admen, but showmen," 
says Haight, whose background too is 
in stage, Hollywood and tv work, 
rather than in advertising. "These are 
pros who've been in production and 
who can take over producing shows." 

Currently, the only agency-produced 
shows out of 26 handled by McCann 
are Sky King and Death Valley Days. 
However, Haight has been increasingly 
worried about the shortage of good 
product in the open market, and antici- 
pates the day when agencies may again 
have to take a more active part in 
creating programs. 

"The pattern that will probably 
emerge is one of co-producing," he 
told sponsor. "It's not economical at 
the moment to have an entire produc- 
ing unit continuously on staff. Actuallv, 
agencies will tend to operate like 
Broadway producers, whose offices are 
usually one- or two-man operations 
between seasons and then they hire 
people for specific stage productions." 
(Please turn to page 74) 



30 



iiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiniiiiiii Milium iiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiip 




BBDO's new net radio specialist, Bill Hoffmann, confers with Godfrey 

NEW FLEXIBILITY FOR NET RADIO 

Network radio suddenly goes on a business spiral. Your agencj 
has just completed a survey of net radio's new values. After years 
of selling and programing radio, they take you out of your pres- 
ent job in radio production and make you a "network radio spe- 
cialist." First thing you do is make a "tour" of the four networks 
to bring yourself up to date on radio's new dimensions and direc- 
tions. Bill Hoffmann, of BBDO's radio-tv department, which is 
headed by v.p. Bob Foreman, got that very assignment, did that 
very thing. Hoffmann has summed up for SPONSOR his impres- 
sions of that "tour." Flexibility: today it is possible to buy 
packages and participations on all nets to fit almost any client 
needs for almost any duration. Old days of buving "firm" on 
full net with guaranteed 13. 26, or 39 weeks are gone. Now you 
can duck in and out fas in newspaper advertising) to obtain am 
frequency desired for seasonal selling peaks. In programing, ra- 
dio nets probably will sharpen shafts that penetrate tv's armor: 
(1) fast news coverage (CBS has strong package; NBC's News 
on the Hour claims 15 million unduplicated homes a week I ; (2) 
weekend marathon formats (NBC's Monitor extended to Friday 
nights; CBS to launch a new weekend plan) ; (3) daytime pro- 
graming (MBS heavy on audience participations, music quizzes; 
ABC building strong morning block of soapers: CBS and NBC 
both in afternoon with same). Capsule rundown follows: 

ABC: Plans rate raise in April. Watch for this net to tap more 
Paramount talent for top names, as in Sinatra deal. New morning 
block of soapers aimed at housewives in under 35 age group. 

CBS: Almost ready to announce new weekend plan a la NBC's 
Monitor. Signing of Phil Rizzuto indicates stress on sports. I)a\ - 
time soapers will continue as emotional backdrop for commercials. 

MBS: Though offering about 500 stations, doesn't claim "power- 
houses." Is attractive buy because of marketing-merchandising 
opportunities at local levels. Bypasses soapers for quizzes, music. 

NBC: New sports plan within Monitor: show itself spills over into 
Friday night. Soapers. bulwark of day. follow CBS pattern more 
closely than ABC concept of shorter episodes. Building on news. 



SPONSOR • 2 FEBRUARY 1957 



fl^&^'.v-. , 



■J. 




project editor: Alfred J. Jaffe 



SPONSOB • 2 KKBKl WHY 1 ( >.~>7 



31 




WRAP-UP 



$120,000,000 FILM BUSINESS IN 1957 

Influx of features brings problems as well as profits as 
competition sharpens, but pace of film growth continues 



^J ne tiling ran he said for sure about 
the film distribution business in 1957: 
there wont be a lack of product. 

On top <>f the natural growth of 
film supph the influx of features last 
year filled the distributors" cupboards 
to the top of the top shelf and gave the 
advertiser interested in spot tv a 
mouth-watering choice. 

True, the feature flood increased 
headaches among some distributors as 
the competitive atmosphere sharpened. 
\iid there was. undeniably, a softening 
of the market for medium- to low- 
grade syndicated film. 

But the film distribution business 
certainly kept pace with the growth of 
other sectors of video, sponsor esti- 
mates the business scored a $100 mil- 
lion \ ear in 1956 and is likely to near 
$120 million in 1957. Considering 
some of the money being laid out 
for features, dollar volume could con- 
ceivably top even that. 

\ rundown of current and future 
trends presents this picture: 

• While 1956 will certainly go down 
in the annals of film distribution as 
the year features hit tv. the big fea- 
ture developments are still to come. 
The strength of the new features as a 
programing and sales lever was barely 
assessed last vear. Programing was 
not started in earnest until the fall and. 
in many markets, the debut will come 
in 1957. While the audience appeal 
of the top star-name features has al- 
ready proven itself, manv clients in- 
terested in full-feature sponsorship are 
still evaluating prices and the burning 
question of what types of features go 
over best on h. 

• The demand for top quality half- 
hour> remains unslaked, especialh 
among regional and almost-but-not- 
quite-national sponsors who need the 

equivalent of a network show- 



case. One rub here, however, is that 
the regionals often don't have or don't 
want to spend enough cash to enable 
distributors to come up with sufficient- 
1\ glossy shows. A major factor in 
these handcuffed ad budgets is that 
some regionals don't distribute their 
products in enough large markets to 
warrant a sizeable outlay for program- 
ing and merchandising. 

Distributors have bewailed this di- 
lemma time and time again. The 
problem was implicit in a recent state- 
ment by Screen Gem's sales v.p. John 
Mitchell that S25.000 was just about 
the top production nut for a syndi- 
cated show under current conditions. 
However since the distributors are 
aware that syndication's strength de- 
pends on programing able to compete 
with network and feature film fare. 
the\ have continually interspersed 
top-budget shows among their more 
economical product. 

The most significant example is 
Guilds Capt. David Grief, reportedly 
budgeted at nearly $50,000 per epi- 
sode. There are also a number in the 
over-$30.000 category, among them 
TPA's Tugboat Annie with $1.25 mil- 
lion set aside for 39 shows. 

• S\ ndicated show- costs have gone 
up, anyway, in the wake of the five-day 
week, which went into effect last year. 

The growing number of outdoor 
shows, with their built-in expense of 
transporting equipment and personnel, 
has also served to push costs up. 
Shows where action takes place on or 
under water (such as the two cited 
above. Ziv's upcoming Harbor Com- 
mand. NBC Film's new Silent Service, 
RKO Tv's soon-to-be-released Sailor of 
Fortune) can be particularly expen- 
sive. MCA-Tv's Waterfront foundered 
on this reef. 

Like network clients, syndication 



film users have broken through the 
cost barrier by alternate week spon- 
sorship. Continental Baking's sharing 
of CBS Films Annie Oakley with Car- 
nation in about 70 markets is a prime 
example. Continental has practically 
the same partner in all of its markets 
but. often, sharing is more com- 
plicated. Soconv-Mobil co-sponsors 
NTA's Sheriff of Cochise in two of its 
07 markets with National Premium 
Beer, which, in turn, co-sponsors the 
show r with American Chicle. Brylcreem 
and Carter Products in four other 
areas. 

Ziv's record of co-sponsorship for its 
own shows reveals an increase of 62% 
in this kind of advertising between 
1953 and 1956. Last year Ziv partici- 
pated in 865 of these marriages among 
1,180 advertisers. Because market 
lineups differ tremendously among cli- 
ents, co-sponsorship represents a great 
challenge to the film salesman who 
must do a considerable amount of 
shopping around to find partners for 
advertisers interested in sharing a 
syndicated series. 

• Adventure shows of all types con- 
tinue to retain a firm hold on the syn- 
dication field. There's a growing ac- 
cent on the military and naval aspects 
of adventure, a reflection of the trend 
to outdoor and '"water"" programing. 

Despite the film distributor's empha- 
sis on the tried-and-true formula of 
fast-action-and-no-fuss. a variety of 
film programing fare continues to pour 
out, ranging from the Encyclopedia 
Britannica films for children ( distrib- 
uted by Trans Lux i to Aggie, RKO 
Tv's new series about a carefree Amer- 
ican fashion buyer in Europe. 

Interest is perking up in sports pro- 
graming, especially in those sports 
people themselves take part in. Olli- 
cial Films has gone off on a new tack 



32 



SPONSOR 



2 FEBRUARY 1957 



TRENDS: features 
took the spotlight in 1956 
but half-hour shows 
remain film backbone 



with an upcoming goll series aimed at 
the 5.5 million who play, plus affiliated 
friends and relatives and. possibly, 
golf widows, Walt Schwimmer is dis- 
tributing .III Star Golf, which lias been 
sold regionally. Schwimmer has com- 
pleted it- third scries (in as main 
years) of Championship Bowling, now 
in 120 markets, while Sterling's second 
set of Bowling Time, read] last fall. 
was placed in 100 markets during the 
last quarter of 1956 and in 60 markets 
during January alone. 

• The feature film influx lias had a 
slight dam|>ening effect on production 
of new half hours for station sale. 
But the long-run effect is not expected 
to he serious, the most important rea- 
sons being (1) the ease of slotting 
half hours compared with feature 
length pictures. (2) the unique pro- 
graming qualities of half-hour show-. 
1 3) the need of regional clients for 
shows that can be merchandised and 
with which they can be identified and 
1 41 the fact that, while certain fea- 
tures have proved able to mow down 
all opposition, there remain main in 
the routine category. 

• While spot tv time franchises de- 
veloped more slowly than on the t\ 
webs, by 1956 a number were clearh 
established. The franchise fills an ob- 
vious need in the spot film field since 
the best way to clear time for a new 
show is to have a show alreadv on the 
air to be replaced. Indeed, it is a 
wonder that, considering the head- 
aches it solves, more franchises aren't 
nailed down. 

• Stripping the same show across- 
the-board, a common daytime practice 
among tv stations was an important 
trend in 1956. It is expected to be 
even more common this year as the 
backlog of syndicated film continues 
to pile up. ^ 





Stripping: Programing >ame show 
across-the-board will grow even more im- 
portant a- film backlog expand-. I'PA'- 
"Susie," a web rerun, i- an example 




Web reruns: Network shows, either 

dropped or -till running, were fertile 
source of syndicated pi' framing in 1956. 
will continue bo this year. Screen Gems 
-ell- "Damon Rnnyon Theatre," above 

Rising costs: Trend i itdoor -how-. 

phi- desire to turn out quality film is 
pushing up price-. I. mhl's "Capt David 
Grief" i- reported budgeted at $50,000 per 

■Mk IP 




Feature film: . , , , , , 

I he) ■ an be rating block- 

busta - I "it progi using problt mi an 

unique. M "' hristopher Columbus" 

from \ l!< f' dm'- \nniwi -ar\ P.i » i ■ 




jporfs: Distributors are showing more 
interest in "participative" sports, such as 
golf and bowling. Above, ' arj Middlecoff, 
Sam Snead in Schwimmer's "Ml Star Golf" 




Co-sponsorship: Show sharing U 

ing. L. to r., L. R. Johnson, assoc ad mgr.. 
Albers cereals (-which will co-sponsor Zh - 
"Men of Vnnapolis") ; Rear \dm. C. C. 
Hartman. II. William-, bd. elir.. Erwin, W 



Mb 




New product: S ( re promi- 

nent among recent or soon-to-be-released 
film fare. NBC Film is currently produc- 
ing "Silent Service," a submarine - 




SYNDICATED FILM 



HOW SPONSORS ARE USING FILM IN 1957 

Clients are buying syndicated film to broaden their reach, 

integrate their merchandising and a host of other reasons 



I he fact that multi-market use of 
syndicated film by national and re- 
gional advertisers cannot he reduced 
to simple marketing formulas is well 
illustrated by those who bought such 
film during the 1956-57 season. 

The fact of spot tv's flexibility is 
reason enough for the variety of ap- 
proaches used but it is not the only 
reason. 

Major U. S. oil firms, which exhib- 
ited a marked swing to multi-market 
use of a single show during the cur- 
rent season, point this variety up in 



the matter of program choice alone. 

For example, Continental Oil bought 
CBS Film's Whirlybirds, a series about 
two proprietors of a helicopter service; 
Standard Oil of California will start 
this month with Guild's Capt. David 
Grief, an exotic South Sea adventure 
saga based on Jack London stories; 
Esso bought Officials dramatic anthol- 
ogy Star Performance, redubbed it 
Golden Playhouse. 

However, it is even dangerous not 
to generalize, for examples of similar 
types of clients buying the same show 



are not hard to find. MCA Tv, which 
sold State Trooper to Falstaff Brewing 
in 71 markets, recently placed the show 
also with Schlitz, Hamm and Carling 
Brewing. Ziv's Dr. Christian has been 
sold to such clients as Lee Optical, 
Blue Cross, Sealy Mattress and a vari- 
ety of health food and insurance com- 
panies, all of whom feel the medical 
atmosphere of the show can enhance 
the impact of their commercials. 

What ties these seemingly incon- 
sistent examples together is this: Syn- 
dicated programing is primarily a 



TREND: Major oil 
firms show marked 
swing toward film 





Esso: Official's "Star Performance" package, redubbed "Golden Playhouse" 
to tie in with new gas. is being used by Esso to reach wider audience than 
it is now reaching with its traditional lineup of news and weather shows 



Socony-Mobil: Oil firm was able to recapture 
time periods dropped for summer hiatus when it 
came back on air with NTA's "Sheriff of Cochise" 



Conoco: Continental Oil replaced a variety of tv 
shows with CBS Film's "Whirlybirds" to provide 
more continuity in its merchandising campaigns 




method of reaching the audience the 
■dvertisei is interested in, whether it 
be s selective audience or ;i general 
one. Because "f tv's expense and wide 
appeal it is the latter type of audience 
thai is usuall) sought and, obviously, 
the all-famil) audience can be ap- 
pealed to in a variet) of ways. On the 
other hand, it is just as logical ti> a-- 
sume that, if one beer firm finds a cer- 
tain program useful, others will, too. 
Because <>f the very nature of ahovi 
business, programing involves judg- 
ment and intuition and it goes without 
-av ing thai thi- facult] is found iii 

\ .living degrees among the ad frater- 
nity. Finally, differing marketing aims 

uind up the catalogue of reasons win 

choosing a syndicated film is not a 
copybook matter. 

A closer look at how some of the 
new syndicated film buys are used can 
provide some in-depth explanation of 
the variety of approaches. 

One of the most important recent 
buys was that of Esso, which distrib- 
utes in the eastern I . S. and has long 




Falstaff: Brewery's establishment <>f time 
franchises with previous films save it a ready- 
made lineup for MCA Tv's "Stat.' Trooper" 



been identified with new- and weather 

-how- on t\. Esso's purchase of Gold- 
en Playhouse did not replace the news 
and weathei -how-; the firm's been 

adding to them. The Ksso \ eit s Im- 
porter is in 2"> markets, weathei shows 
are in five. The film buj i- an effoi I 
1>\ Esso and it- agency, McCann-Erick- 
son. to reach people not being reached 
l>\ its current tv format as well as a 

means of hitting new audiences in 
markets not hitherto covered b) tv. 
(The holes in Essw's t\ audience wire 
delineated li\ market research.) 

Golden Playhouse -tailed off I Oc- 
tober and is now in 15 markets. It i- 
I sso's first -\ndicated film buy. aid- 
ing a film show on top of it- other 
video program commitments could 
strain Esso's ad budget so the agencv 
did not choose brand new product. 
Golden Playhouse consists mostK of 
lour Star Playhouse, a former net- 
work -how. plus some Stage 7 and 
The Star and the Story episodes. The 
second is also an ertswhile web pack- 
age, while the latter, while not off the 
network, has been sold locally. 

While the shows picked have been 
circulating for some time, a number 
had never been seen in some of Esso's 
markets. As a matter of fact, during 
the first 13- week cycle there were first 
run shows in about 35 markets. 

"We don't run the same show in all 
markets the same week."' explained 
McCann's Grant Tinker. "We not onlv 
had to make sure we picked as main 
fn-t run shows as possible for each 
market but had to schedule them dif- 
ferently in each market so that where 
the shows were reruns thev are re- 
moved as far as possible from the first 
runs. It was a gigantic -election job." 

Esso was not a stranger to main of 
the stations where Golden Pla\ house is 
now running but as a client new to 
the syndicated film field the clearance 
job still represented a problem. \\ ith 
McCann's buying power and prestige 
as a help, however, the agency knocked 
off a nice collection of clearances. In 
the 7:30-11:00 p.m. period covered 1>\ 
network programing. 33 markets were 
cleared for the show. This included 
such important markets to Esso a< 
Philadelphia, New Haven. Providence, 
Lancaster - Harrisburg. Binghamton, 
\\ inston-Salem, Roanoke and .Mem- 
phis. Satisfactory times have -till not 
been cleared in five markets, including 
New >, ork and Pittsburgh. However. 



Nrw Haven covers a portion oi the 
foi nii-i - metropolitan at ea 

In addition t<» the 33 mai kets i ited, 
McCann cleared six markets in the 
7:(Mi-7:3ii time. The othei half dozen 
wen- between six and seven. In two 
of the markets, Alexandria, La., and 

Fort Smith. \rk.. McCann is widening 

the audience via the double exposure 
pattern. 

While Esso bought (, allien Play' 
Ituiis,- to widen the audience to its ad- 
vertising, the -how i- not an audience 
filter device. It- purpose i- to reach 

the entire familv and it- advertising 
not onlv seeks to sell Esso gas but also 
the Esso name, the latter ad policy B 
duplicate of it- approach on it- short- 
er shows. The show title is a means 
of familiarizing the audience with Es- 
so's third, and highest-octane, grade 
gas. Marketing the new ga-o|ines foi 
high-compression engines i- the top in- 
dustry problem at present. 

While it is true that most gasoline is 
bought by men. it i- also apparent that 
the percent of women driver- is in- 
creasing and the mileage driven bv 
women is also going up with the wide. 
spread shift to suburban living. \- 
for younger familv members, I - 
like most large corporation- todav. 
thinks ahead to the time when the 
youngsters will be adults and. hence, 
is planting its identitv for future sales. 
It is also apparent that Esso can land 
does) use other media for more direct 
appeals to male drivers. 

(Important among these media i- 
spot radio, on which Esso has long had 
a pattern of sponsoring fom news 
shows dailv -i\ time- a week. McCann 
recentlv took a new look at Esso's ra- 
dio commitments and decided to move 
out of nighttime and emphasize morn- 
ing radio more. The agencv felt that 
with the client's new tv effort-, niidit- 
time audience- were adequate!) cov- 
ered. i 

For all the foregoing reasons and 

because of tv'- high COStS EsSO IS 

using Golden Playhouse to spearhead 
its advertising to familv audiences, and 

not men onlv . 

\n interesting contrast t" Esso is 
Continental Oil. which is dropping a 
varietv of -how-, including new- pro- 
grams, to put in first-run M hirlybirds. 
Like Esso. however. Conoco the ac- 
cent is on the first syllable, as distin- 
guished from Sunoco i is al-o inter- 
i Please turn to page \<* I 



SPONSOR 



2 FEBRUARY 195*3 



35 




FEATURE FILM 



FEATURES' TOP IMPACT YET TO COME 

Ad Row is busily evaluating movies while there's still time. 

One conclusion: melodramas make the best feature fare on tv 



I hough the new feature film pack- 
ages have already left their very im- 
pressive mark on the video business, 
the big story is yet to come. 

The big packages barely got their 
steam up during the fall of last year. 
Some stations kicked off with their 
newly - acquired features only last 
month. And, in a number of markets, 
starting dates are in the future. 

Important, too, is the fact that only 
a part of the packages have been re- 
leased. NTA, for example, has less 
than a third of the 440-odd 20th Cen- 
tury-Fox pictures it has contracted for 
on the market. 

These facts have been giving adver- 
tisers, especially those wondering 
about whether to go into full-feature 
sponsorship, a breathing spell to evalu- 



ate the uses of features and answer 
questions such as: 

Is there enough excitement for the 
full-feature sponsor of cream movies 
to carry over to the product? What 
days are best for features? What kinds 
of features will go over best on tv? Is 
it worthwhile for an advertiser to pay 
a premium to get the features he 
wants? 

Since some clients are contemplating 
feature buys on a nationwide basis, 
which involves millions of dollars, 
these questions are critical. They not 
only involve huge expenditures of 
money but important changes in buy- 
ing strategy and, possibly, relinquish- 
ment of valuable franchises. 

A client who probably knows as 
much about the problem as anyone is 



Bristol-Myers. The drug firm is not 
only involved in full-feature sponsor- 
ship in a half dozen markets currently 
but pioneered such sponsorship in Los 
Angeles a year ago. B-M bought the 
7:30 Theatre on KTTV, using Screen 
Gems features out of Columbia. 

From this experience B-M and its 
agencies evolved some rough buying 
guides. Perhaps most important is the 
belief that the melodramatic type of 
feature has the best audience-holding 
power. 

A Y&R programing executive close- 
ly connected with B-M"s movie buys 
said: "I suppose the reason for the 
popularity of melodrama on tv is in 
the nature of tv viewing compared to 
motion picture viewing. In a movie 
(Please turn to page 50) 



TREND: Weekend slots 
picked for features as 
viewers stay up late 





Star names are big factor in feature film 
ratings. Above, Clark Gable in "Honky Tonk," 
one of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer package of 723 



Stripping has become associated with "M 
lion Dollar Movie" package of RKO 1 
Vbove, Bergman and Sanders in "Stranger 



Older generation of viewers like movies, identify them- 
selves with stars they knew. Below, Bette Davis, George Brent, 
Mary Astor in Warner Bros. "The Great Lie," an AAP feature 



Heavy promotion, such as used for RKO's 
"Underwater," may blur use of box office grosses 
to evaluate movies. C&C Tv distributes the feature 



36 




f 







mma Villi fa — San Anionic 
Spanish "Little Town" is nestled in the 
shadows of modern skyscrapers. Today, 
San Antonio has grown to such metrop- 
olis proportions its total buying income is 
greater than Oklahoma City, Syracuse, 




f 






m ■ 



A;H 




* 



. C'HUrf 




. . ;ii vh 

















*f"< *s 



**«•< 






M 







r 



IN EACH TELEVISION MARKET 

THERE IS ONLY ONE LEADER. 

IN SAN ANTONIO, IT'S KENS-TV 

REPRESENTED BY PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD, INC 




KENS-TV 



EXPRESS-NEWS STATION 





SAN ANTON IO, TEX / 




FILM LIST 



HERE'S A LIST OF FILM FOR SALE 



Film now on market 
covers wide variety 
of program matter 



Jf\. large cross-section of film product 
now on the market is listed below. It 
includes syndicated series, broken 
down by program type; feature pack- 
ages, shorts, cartoons and miscellane- 
ous programing packages. 

While not a complete list it includes 
practically all the important series and 
feature packages which were available 
as 1957 began. 

A listing here does not mean the 
program is available or can be bought 
for any market. There are instances 



here where the film is already sold in 
the important markets. In other cases, 
the films have run in many markets 
but are available on a rerun basis. 

The list does show, however, the 
wide variety of program matter put 
out by film distributors for both sta- 
tions and advertisers. It should be 
especially useful to stations interested 
in knowing the backlog of particular 
shows for various program uses. The 
size of each show category is a rough 
guide to that category's appeal. ^ 



PROGRAM 


SYNDICATOR 


LENGTH 


NO. 
AVAILABLE 


PROGRAM 


SYNDICATOR 


LENGTH 


NO. 

AVAILABLE 


ADVENTURE 










CARTOONS 








Adventures of China Smith 


NTA 


30 


min. 


26 


Animated Fairy Tales 


RKO Tv 


10 min. 


13 


Adventures of China Smith, New 


NTA 


30 


min. 


26 


Cartoons 


Screen Gems 


varied 


282 


Adventures of the Falcon 


NBC Tv Films 


30 


min. 


39 


Cartoons 


Sterling 


varied 


70 


Adventures of Scarlet Pimpernel 


Official 


30 


min. 


18 


Crusader Rabbit 


Geo. Bagnall 


5 min. 


195 


Aggie 


RKO Tv 


30 


min. 


26 


Funzapoppin Cartoons 


Geo. Bagnall 


varied 


107 


Armchair Adventure 


Sterling 


15 


min. 


39 


Popeye 


Assoc. Artists 


varied 


234 


Assignment Foreign Legion 


CBS Tv Film 


30 


min. 


26 


Terrytoons 


CBS Tv Film 


varied 


156 


Biff Baker, USA 


MCA Tv 


30 


min. 


26 


Tinderbox 


Cinema-Vue 


65 min. 


1 


Byline — Steve Wilson 


MS.-A Alexander 


30 


min. 


39 


Walter Lantz Cartoons 


Ziv Tv 


10 min. 


26 


Captain Callant 


TPA 


30 


min. 


39 


Warner Bros. Cartoons 


Assoc. Artists 


varied 


337 


Cases of Eddie Drake 


CBS Tv Film 


30 


min. 


13 


Whimseyland Cartoons 


Cinema-Vue 


varied 


150 


Combat Sergeant 


NTA 


30 


min. 


13 










Count of Monte Cristo 
Cross Current 


TPA 

Official 

NBC Tv Films 


30 
30 
30 


min. 
min. 
min. 


39 
39 
39 


CHILDREN'S 








Crunch and Des 


Adventures of Danny Dee 


Cinema-Vue 


30 min. 


40 


Crusader 


MCA Tv 


30 


min. 


52 


Animal Adventure 


Sterling 


15 min. 


39 


Dangerous Assignment 


NBC Tv Films 


30 


min. 


39 


Animal Adventures for Children 


Coronet 


varied 


13 


Dateline Europe 


Official 


30 


min. 


78 


Animal Crackers 


Sterling 


varied 


60 


Foreign Legionnaire 


TPA 


30 


min. 


39 


Blackstone the Magician 


Harriscope 


3 min. 


39 


Hawkeye, Last of the Mohicans 


TPA 


30 


min. 


39 


Bobo the Hobo 


Lakeside 


15 min. 


26 


The Hunter 


Official 


30 


min. 


26 


Christie Comedies 


Harriscope 


15 min. 


107 


1 Search for Adventure 


Geo. Bagnall 


30 


min. 


52 


Cyclone Malone 


Harry S. Goodman 


15 min. 


65 


jet Jackson 


Screen Gems 


30 


min. 


39 


jim & Judy in Tele-Land 


Lakeside 


15 mill. 


52 


lungle 


Sterling 


15 


min. 


46 


Johnny Jupiter 


Assoc. Artists 


30 min. 


39 


jungle Jim 


Screen Gems 


30 


min. 


26 


Jump jump of Holiday House 


Harry S. Goodman 


15 min. 


65 


King's Crossroads 


Sterling 


30 


min. 


90 


Let's Draw 


Geo. Bagnall 


15 min. 


52 


Long John Silver 


CBS Tv Film 


30 


min. 


26 


Playland Films 


Sterling 


varied 


60 


Man Called "X" 


Ziv Tv 


30 


min. 


39 


Ray Forrest 


Sterling 


30 min. 


26 


Men of Annapolis 


Ziv Tv 


30 


min. 


•39 


Stories for Children 


Coronet 


varied 


13 


Overseas Adventure 


OHicial 


80 


min. 


;., 


Streamlined Fairy Tales 


Harry S. Goodman 


15 min. 


13 


Passport to Danger 


ABC Film Swulication 


30 


min 


39 


link & Andy ABC Art Adventures 


Cavalcade Tv 


15 min. 


26 


Ramar of the jungle 


1 PA 


30 


min. 


52 










Range Busters 
Sailor of Fortune 


M&A Alexander 

RKO Tv 

ABC Film Swulication 


in 

so 

30 


min. 
min. 
min. 


16 
26 
26 


DETECTIVE, MYSTERY 








Sheena, Queen of the Jungle 


Badge 714 


NBC 1\ Films 


30 min. 


126 


State Trooper 


Ml \ Tv 


30 


min. 


39 


Captured 


NBC 1\ Films 


30 min. 


26 


Terry and the Pirates 


Official 


30 


min. 


18 


City Detective 


M( \ Tv 


30 min. 


65 


Three Musketeers 


ABC Film Syndication 


30 


min. 


26 


Code 3 


ABC Film Syndication 


30 min. 


39 


The Tracer 


MPA Tv 


30 


min. 


39 


Col. March of Scotland Yard 


Official 


30 min. 


26 


Waterfront 


\H \ Tv 


30 


min. 


78 


Fabian of Scotland Yard 


CBS Tv Film 


30 min. 


39 


Whirlybirds 


CBS Tv Film 


|Q 


min. 


39 


Federal Men 


M( \ Tv 


30 min. 


39 



Listing continues page 42 



;:: 



SPONSOR 



2 FEBRUARY 1957 



AND THE 







starring 



John HART- LonCHANEY 

as HAWKEYE as CHINGACHGOOK 



James Fenimore Cooper's beloved hero is "the 
most famous character the world over" according 
to the Saturday Review. He's everybody's idol! 
Young and old thrill to the bravery of Hawkeye. 
It's outdoor action for the whole family. And, 
being the first "Eastern" of all TV outdoor 
action series, it gives you greater sponsor iden- 
tification. Fabulous controlled merchandising 
opportunities, too! Top markets are still avail- 
able, but now that the news is out, they're 
being snapped up quickly. Wire or phone collect 
for your market reservation before others beat 
you to it. 



t pa 



Television Programs of America, Inc. 



EDWARD SMALL 



ILTON A. CORDON 



MICHAEL M. SILLERMAN 



486 Madison Ave.. New York 22, N. V. ■ PL. B-2100 




* 



Only market place of its kind. Gives programing profile of every 
tv and radio station in the United States and Canada. 
Published each March. Advertising forms close mid February 



RADIO AND TELEVISION 



1> 

^ buyers' guide 

to station programing 




If you were a timebuyer asked to make up a list of 60 farm stations 
how would you go about it? If it were your job to build lists of 
stations featuring farm programing, or sport shows, or negro, news 
of Latin American programing, homemaker shows or other special appeal 
programing where would you turn? 

If you were asked to make up a list of tv stations on one day's 
notice and needed film and slide requirements of each station; if you 
had to know about likely homemaker shows, farm programs, sportscasts, 
feature film availabilities - what would you do? 

The busy timebuyer, account executive, and ad manager turn to the 
Buyers' Guide to Station Programing . It works wonders for him. It's 
the only tool enabling him to quickly, accurately and expertly sort 
out the 3,500-plus radio and tv stations of the U.S. and Canada by 
their program characteristics. 

The 1957 BUYERS' GUIDE is as basic as your rate card. It's the only 
source of its kind. Your ad in BUYERS' GUIDE, near the programing 
analysis of your own station, will benefit from a year 'round exposure 
before the largest concentration of advertiser-agency readership in 
the trade paper field. BUYERS' GUIDE goes to the full SPONSOR reader 
list of 13,500 circulation. 

Send your reservation in right away. Use the attached order form, 
or wire collect for choice position. Regular rates and frequency 
discounts apply. Advertising deadline is 15 February. Regards. 



Sincerel y , 

Arnold Alpert f 



BOLDFACE LISTING WITHOUT COST 

Along with your ad in the 1957 
BUYERS' GUIDE your station 
will be listed in boldface in 
the master directory. 



SPONSOR SERVICES INC.. 40 EAST 49th ST.. NEW YORK 17. N Y. 

1957 BUYERS' GUIDE ADVERTISING ORDER FORM 



Please reserve following space in the 
1957 BUYERS' GUIDE TO STATION PROGRAMING 



Q full page 



$450 



□ half page .... $265 

horizontal 



□ two-third page . $330 

□ one-third page . $180 

" deep 
horizontal (master directory only) 



I understand my ad entitles me to boldface listing of my 
station in the master directory at no extra cost. 

NOTE TO CONTRACT AOVERTISERS: Etmed contract rates including frequency 
discounts. ippUa i BUYERS' GUIDE .... i T.W.I. FACTS I 

□ I prefer placement in Master Directory 

□ I prefer placement in category listings 

Firm 

City 



-Zone- 



State 



Name- 



CATEGORY 

LISTINGS 

RADIO 

Classical Music 
Farm Service 
Country and 

Western Music 
Foreign Language 
Latin American 
Scgro 
Popular Music 



TELEVISION 

Farr> 

Feature Film 

Homemaking 

Special Facilities & 
Film & Slide 
Specifications 

Specialized Appeals 

Sports 



PROGRAM 



SYNOICATOR 



NO. 
LENGTH AVAILABLE 



PROGRAM 



SYNDICATOR 



NO. 
LENGTH AVAILABLE 



DETECTIVE (Continued) 



Files of Jeffrey Jones 

Front Page Detective 

Cangbustcrs 

Highwiy Patrol 

I Am the Law 

Inner Sanctum 

Man Behind the Badge 

Mystery Is My Business 

New Orleans Police Dept. 

Police Call 

Public Prosecutor 

Public Prosecutor 

Racket Squad 

San Francisco Beat 

The Whistler 

DOCUMENTARY 



CBS Tv Film 30 min. 39 

Geo. Bagnall 30 min. 39 

RKO I I 30 min. 

/iv I v 30 min. 78 

Sterling 30 min. 26 

NBC Tv Films 30 min. 

M( A T> 30 min. 39 

TPA 30 min. 

MPA I \ 30 min. 39 

NTA 30 min. 26 

Geo. Bagnall 15 min. 26 

Sterling 15 min. 26 

ABC Film Syndication 30 min. 98 

CBS Tv Film 30 min. 39 

CBS Tv Film 30 min. 39 



Beyond the Yukon 
Crusade in the Pacific 
Documentary Package 
Createst Drama 
Movie Museum 
On the Spot 
Profile 

Uncommon Valor 
Victory At Sea 
Wanted 

War in the Air 
Where in the World 
This World of Ours 
The World We Live In 

DRAMA 



Harriscope 


15 


min. 


13 


Sterling 


30 


min. 


26 


Lakeside 


varied 


500 


RKO Tv 


15 


min. 


39 


Sterling 


15 


min. 


160 


Lakeside 


15 


min. 


39 


Trans-Lux 


15 


min. 


39 


RKO Tv 


30 


min. 


26 


NBC Tv Films 


30 


min. 


26 


I akeside 


30 


min. 


20 


RKO Tv 


30 


min. 


15 


Lakeside 


15 


min. 


104 


Sterling 


15 


min. 


26 


Sterling 


15 


min. 


65 



All Star Theatre 


Screen Gems 


30 


min. 


156 


American Legend 


Official 


30 


min. 


39 


American Wit & Humor 


Sterling 


30 


min. 


13 


Celebrity Playhouse 


Screen Gems 


30 


min. 


39 


Curtain Call 


MCA Tv 


30 


min. 


39 


Damon Runyon Theatre 


Screen Gems 


30 


min. 


39 


Dilemma 


Harry S. Goodman 


15 


min. 


13 


Dr. Christian 


Ziv Tv 


30 


min. 


39 


Dr. Hudson's Secret Journal 


MCA Tv 


30 


min. 


39 


Douglas Fairbanks Jr. Presents 


ABC Film Syndication 


30 


min. 


117 


Famous Playhouse 


MCA Tv 


30 


min. 


300 


Headline 


MCA Tv 


30 


min. 


39 


Heart of the City 


MCA Tv 


30 


min. 


91 


Herald Playhouse 


ABC Film Svndication 


30 


min. 


52 


Hollywood Half Hour 


Geo. Bagnall 


30 


min. 


38 


If You Had A Million 


MCA Tv 


30 


min. 


39 


International Playhouse 


NTA 


30 


min. 


26 


Invitation Playhouse 


Sterling 


15 


min. 


26 


Little Show 


Sterling 


15 


min. 


32 


Little Theatre 


Sterling 


15 


min. 


52 


Magic Vault 


Lakeside 


30 


min. 


104 


Mayor of the Town 


MCA Tv 


30 


min. 


39 


Night Editor 


Lakeside 


15 


min. 


26 


Orient Express 


NTA 


30 


min. 


26 


Paradox 


Kling Film 


5 


min. 


26 


Paragon Playhouse 


NBC Tv Films 


30 


min. 


39 


The Passerby 


NTA 


15 


min. 


26 


The Playhouse 


ABC Film Svndication 


30 


min. 


52 


Playhouse 15 


\1( A Tv 


15 


min. 


78 


Play of the Week 


NTA 


30 


min. 


' 26 


Ray Milland Show 


M( A Tv 


30 


min. 


76 


Screen Directors Playhouse 


RKO Tv 


30 


min. 


39 


Stage 7 


TPA 


30 


min. 


39 


Star and the Story 


Official 


30 


min. 


39 


Star Performance 


Official 


30 


min. 




Studio 57 


\1( \ Tv 


30 


min. 


26 


Theatre with Lilli Palmer 


NTA 


30 


min. 


26 


Top Plays 


Screen Grins 


30 


min. 


44 


Under the Sun 


CBS Tv Film 


30 


min. 


26 


The Visitor 


NBC Tv Films 


30 


min. 


44 


Your Star Showcase 


TPA 


30 


min. 


52 



EDUCATIONAL 



American Heritage 
Career Planning 



Coronet 
Coronet 



varied 

vai ied 



13 
13 



EDUCATIONAL (Continued) 



Children of the Americas 
Dating. Marriage. Family 
Democracy at Work 
Getting Along Socially 
How Others Live 
John Kiernan's Kaleidoscope 
Personality Development 
The Shaping of America 
The Story of America 
Watch the World 
World of Yesterday 
Your Days At School 



FEATURES 



Coronet varied 1 3 

Coconet varied 1 3 

Coronet varied 1 3 

Coronet varied 13 

Coronet varied 13 

ABC Film Svndication 15 min. 104 

Coronet varied 13 

Coronet varied 1 3 

Coronet varied 13 

NBC Tv Films 15 min. 26 

Coronet varied 1 3 

Coronet varied 13 



Anniversary Package 


ABC Film Syndication 


varied 


Bagnall Package 


Geo. Bagnall 


aried 


Beverly 


NTA 


i aried 


Cardinal 


NTA 


taried 


Classics 


Assoc. Artists 


taried 


Edward Small Features 


TPA 


varied 


English Features 


Screencraft 


varied 


Fabulous Forty 


NTA 


taried 


Features 


Quality Films 


taried 


Features 


Screen Gems 


taried 


Feature Special 


Lakeside 


varied 


Hal Roach 


NTA 


i aried 


Library 


M&A Alexander 


t aried 


MCM Library 


MGM Tv 


varied 


Million Dollar Movie Package — 1 


RKO Tv 


varied 


Million Dollar Movie Package —1 


RKO Tv 


i aried 


Movieland 


Assoc. Artists 


taried 


Movietime USA 


C&C Tv 


varied 


PC Features 


NTA 


varied 


Power Plus 


M&A Alexander 


varied 


PSI Features 


NTA 


varied 


Return of Rin Tin Tin 


Geo. Bagnall 60 min 


Rocket 86 


NTA 


varied 


7th Anniversary 


M&A Alexander 


varied 


Sherlock Holmes 


Assoc. Artists 


varied 


Spanish Language 


Cavalcade Tv 


varied 


Star Features 


Screencraft 


varied 


Sterling Package 


Sterling 


varied 


TNT Package 


NTA 


varied 


20th Century Fox Films 


NTA 


varied 


Variety Features 


Screencraft 


varied 


Warner Brothers Library 


Assoc. Artists 


varied 


Western Features 






Starring Cene Autry 


MCA Tv 60 min 


Western Features 






Starring Roy Rogers 


MCA Tv 60 min 


Westerns 


Assoc. Artists 


varied 


Westerns 


M&A Alexander 


varied 


Westerns 


NTA 


varied 


Westerns 


Screencraft 


varied 


Westerns 


Screen Gems 


varied 


Western Special 


Lakeside 


varied 



HEALTH 



Health and Happiness Club 

M. D. 

Your Health and Safety 

INTERVIEW 



Candid Camera 
Candid Camera 
Lilli Palmer Show 

MUSICAL 



Ballet 

Eddy Arnold Time 
Famous Cuests 
Cuy Lombardo 
Holiday in Paris 
The Hormel Cirls 
Huespedes Famosos 
Music of the Masters 



N I \ 
NTA 
Coronet 



16 

33 

8 

7 

11 

35 

13 

46 

40 

466 

133 

14 

140 

723 

27 

17 

73 

742 

22 

18 

40 

1 

86 

13 

12 

39 

17 

35 

35 

52 

29 

754 

56 

67 
38 
46 
31 
38 
135 
131 



5 min. 


105 


5 min. 


39 


varied 


13 



Assoc. Artists 


15 min. 


100 


Assoc. Artists 


30 min. 


89 


NBC Tv Films 


15 min. 


26 



Sterling 


15 min. 


26 


Walter Schwimmer 


30 min. 


26 


Cavalcade Tv 


30 min. 


13 


MCA Tv 


30 min. 


78 


CBS Tv Film 


30 min. 


13 


Kling Film 


15 min. 


44 


Cavalcade Tv 


30 min 


13 


NTA 


15 min. 


13 



Listing continues page 44 



12 



SPONSOR • 2 FEBRUARY 1957 



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starring BARRY NELSON 

KEITH LARSEN 

** ■ ■ ■ adventure-intrigue 

-the f 0rmat that C0nsjstent(y 

- H,GH - H,GH ^very rating service f h 



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*2%^ 




Contact The Man 
From Official Today! 



OFFICIAL FILMS, inc 



25 West 45th Street, New York 36, N 

Plaza 7-0100 



REPRESENTATIVE IN 

New York • Beverly Hills • Chicago • "alias • Atlanta • St. L«i 
Boston • Minneapolis • Philadelphia • San Francisco ♦. Mia 



PROGRAM 



SYNDICATOR 



LENGTH AVAILABLE 



SYNDICATOR 



NO. 
AVAILABLE 



MUSICAL (Continued) 



Old American Barn Dance 

Opera and Ballet 

Patti Page Show 

Rosemary Clooney Show 

Tele-Musicals 

This Is Your Music 

Vienna Philharmonic 

NATURE, OUTDOORS 



Kling Film 

Lakeside 

Screen Gems 

M( \ Tv 

Harriscope 

Official 

Sterling 



Adventure Out of Doors 
Nature in Action 
Wild Life in Action 

NEWS 



Sportlite 
( oronel 



CBS Ncwsfilm 

Washington Merry Co Round 

RELIGIOUS 



CBS Tv Film 
Harrj S Goodman 



Hand to Heaven 

It Can Happen to You 

Layman's Call to Prayer 

Man's Heritage 

Out of the Past 

SCIENCE 



N I \ 

Geo Bagnall 

N I \ 
\ l \ 

I ak. 



Do You Know Why? 
Science in Action 
Science in Action 



SHORTS 



MI'A V\ 

Coronet 

TPA 



Charlie Chaplin Comedies 

Funzapoppin Comedies 

Movietime USA Short Subjects 

Old Timer Comedies 

Race Night 

Scallawags 

Warner Short Subjects 

SITUATION COMEDY 



Cinema-Vue 
Geo. Bagnall 
C&C 1 v 
Cinema-Vue 
Geo. Bagnall 
Geo. Bagnall 
Assoc. Artists 



Amos 'n' Andy 

Boss Lady 

Great Cildcrsleeve 

Halls of Ivy 

His Honor, Homer Bell 

Life of Riley 

Life With Father 

Mickey Rooney Show 

My Hero 

My Little Margie 

So This Is Hollywood 

Studs Place 

Susie 

The Trouble With Father 

Willy 



CBS Tv Film 

M&A Alexander 

NBC Tv Films 

TPA 

N B< Tv Films 

NBC Tv Films 

CBS Tv Film 

Screencraft 

Official 

Official 

Harriscope 

Harry S. Goodman 

TPA 

Official 

Official 



30 min. 


26 


15 min. 


i 


15 min. 


78 


30 min. 


39 


3 min. 


1 Hi 


50 min. 


26 


1 '< mm. 


13 



15 min. 


26 


varied 


13 


15 min. 


52 



12 min. 
1.) min. 



30 min. 
30 min. 
5 min. 
10 min. 
30 min. 



5-a-week 
39 



13 
13 



39 



5 min. 


200 


varied 


13 


30 min. 


52 



varied 


52 


varied 


755 


vai ied 


1,000 


varied 


300 


9 min. 


52 


varied 


Li4 


varied 


1,400 



30 min. 


78 


30 min. 


13 


30 min. 


39 


30 min. 


39 


30 min. 


39 


30 min. 


143 


30 min. 


26 


30 min. 


33 


30 min. 


33 


30 min. 


126 


30 min. 


24 


30 min. 


26 


30 min. 


104 


30 min. 


130 


30 min. 


39 



SPORTS (Continued) 


Main Event Wrestling 
Main Event Wrestling 
Ringside With the Rasslers 
Sport Skills 
Sports on Parade 

SYNDICATED LIBRARY 


Harriscorx 
Harriscope 
Geo. Bagnall 
Coronet 
Sterling 


t>(J min. 
30 min. 
60 min. 
varied 
15 min. 


52 
26 
52 
13 

75 



Economee Tv Ziv I \ 

Encyclopedia Britannica Films Trans-Lux 

Pep Package \ I \ 

TRAVEL 



Holiday 

Holiday U. S. A. 

The Travel Bug 

WESTERN 



\ i \ 

Geo. Bagnall 

Sportlite 



Adventures of Champion 

Adventures of Kit Carson 

Annie Oakley 

Brave Eagle 

Buffalo Bill, Jr. 

Cisco Kid 

Frontier 

Cene Autry Show 

Hopalong Cassidy 

Hopalong Cassidy 

judge Roy Bean 

Range Rider 

Sheriff of Cochise 

Steve Donovan West'n Marshal 

Tales of the Texas Rangers 

WOMEN'S 



CBS Tv Film 
M( \ Tv 
CBS Tv Film 
CBS Tv Film 
CBS Tv Film 
Ziv Tv 

NBC Tv Films 
CBS Tv Film 
NBC Tv Films 
NBC I \ lilms 
Screencraft 
CBS Tv Film 
NTA 

NBC Tv Films 
Screen Gems 



Adventures in Sewing 
For the Ladies 
Home Management 
Sewing Room 
Tv Kitchen 

MISCELLANEOUS 



Lakeside 
Sterling 
Coronet 
Geo. Bagnall 
Kling Film 



Animal: 

Animal Package 

Comedy: 

Scene With a Star 

Discussion: 

The Big Idea 

Dramatic Readings: 

James Mason Show 



Lakeside 



Geo. Bagnall 



RKO Tv 



NTA 



30 min. 


600 


approx. 


varied 


650 


approx. 


varied 




1,400 


30 min. 




13 


30 min. 




13 


15 min. 




13 



30 min. 


26 


30 min. 


104 


30 min. 


52 


30 min. 


26 


30 min. 


26 


30 min. 


180 


30 min. 


30 


30 min. 


91 


60 min. 


54 


30 min. 


52 


30 min. 


39 


30 min. 


78 


30 min. 


39 


30 min. 


39 


30 min. 


26 



30 min. 


13 


15 min. 


90 


varied 


13 


15 min. 


13 


30 min. 


26 



varied 



15 min. 



30 min. 



15 min. 



100 



13 



30 



26 



SPORTS 



Adventures in Sports 

All-Girl Wrestling 

All American Wrestling 

All-Star Coif 

Big Playback 

Big 10 Football Hilites 

Bill Corum Sports Show 

Bowling Time 

Boxing from Rainbo 

Bud Wilkinson Show 

Championship Bowling 

Championship Wrestling from 

Hollywood 
Double Play 
Gadabout Caddis 
Indianapolis Highlights 
jalopy Races from Hollywood 
Let's Co Coifing 
Mad Whirl 



Sterling 

Harriscope 

Kling Film 

Walter Schwimmer 

Screen Gems 

Sportlite 

NTA 

Sterling 

Kling Film 

Sportlite 

Walter Schwimmer 

Cinema-Vue 

Cavalcade Tv 

Sterling 

Harriscope 

Harriscope 

Sportlite 

NTA 



15 


min. 


30 


min. 


60 


min. 


,,o 


min. 


15 


min. 


30 


min. 


15 


min. 


i,ii 


min. 


30 


min. 


15 


min. 


60 


min. 


60 


min. 


15 


min. 


15 


min. 


SO 


min. 


so 


min. 


15 


min. 


30 


min. 



26 
26 
26 
26 
52 
13 
26 
26 
26 
39 
78 

39 
13 
26 
2 
26 
13 
26 



Hobby: 

Find a Hobby 

Holidays: 

jingle Dingles Christmas Party 

Quiz: 

Pantomime Quiz 

Science Fiction: 

Science Fiction Theatre 

Serials: 

Serials 

Variety: 

Paul Killiam 



NTA 



Cinema-Vue 



NTA 



Ziv Tv 



Screen Gems 



Sterling 



15 min. 



60 min. 



30 min. 



30 min. 



varied 



15 min. 



26 



78 



53 



26 



44 



M>.i\m>K 



2 FEBRUARY 1957 






• / 




SPONSOR 



2 FEBRl ARY 1951 



45 



SYNDICATED FILM 

(Continued from page 35) 

ested in the entire family, and for the 
same reasons. 

Conoco kicked off with Whirlybirds 
on 22 January and has a target of 47 
markets by the end of 1957. It dis- 
tributes in the midwest, its selling area 
going up to, but not including, the 
west coast states. Tv plays a strong 
supporting ad role for the client, whose 
major medium is newspapers. 

The purchase of Whirlybirds was 
Conoco's way of putting all its tv ad- 



vertising under one roof. The desire 
for a single, integrated merchandising 
plan was one of the reasons for the 
move. Conoco is also interested in 
using one of the personalities on the 
show I there are two: Kenneth Tobey 
and Craig Hill I but it hasn't settled on 
how it will go about it. 

Despite the flexibility of spot, ad- 
vertisers in the medium often find an 
overall approach is desirable. In dis- 
cussing Conoco's tv plans. B&B's Jack 
Phillips told sponsor: "We want mer- 
chandising with more continuitv. The 
show will provide Conoco with its own 




Need a lift in the 
San Antonio area? 



A burden in the ha 
is worth a schedule on KONO 



. . . that's why 88 national advertising 
budgets include KONO Radio . . . year 
after year. 

Get the facts — see your H-R or Clarke 
Brown man. 






860 kc 5000 watts 



KONO 



SAN ANTONIO 






RADIO 



m 



property. This is a departure from 
past policy where we had a variety of 
advertising methods, including an- 
nouncements. We also like the half- 
hour show because we find the longer 
commercial is often useful. Our prod- 
uct message requires reason - why 
copy." 

Conoco's ad theme for the past three 
springs in both print and air media 
has been a salute to new cars during 
a period when interest in new cars is 
high. This advertising, which will 
probably be repeated in some form in 
1957, "marries'' new cars with gaso- 
line by linking the twin ideas of high 
quality gas and high compression 
engines. 

Conoco at present only distributes 
its new third grade of gas in Houston, 
where Humble Oil. an Esso affiliate 
and Conoco competitor, also markets 
a gas for the new high compression 
engines. 

Because of the variety approach in 
tv programing, Conoco's old commit- 
ments terminate in different times so 
that the clearance job is a step-by-step 
affair. In some cases, Conoco's old 
programing helped pave the way for 
clearing the new show. In other cases, 
the agency has to carve out new fran- 
chises. 

While on the subject of clearances, 
it is notable that Socony-Mobil, now 
using NTA's first run Sheriff of Co- 
chise, was able to recapture in many 
cases the slots it had for a previous 
show after a summer hiatus. Socony 
had used ABC Films Douglas Fair- 
banks anthologv during the 1955-56 
season. The firm's budget couldn't 
carry the show after 1 Julv. so Socony 
took a summer vacation from tv pro- 
graming. 

Marketing its products in the mid- 
west. Socony made its debut with Sher- 
iff of Cochise in 50 markets during the 
beginning of October and. at press- 
time, had built the lineup to 67. As in 
the case of the previous two oil firms. 
Socony wants a wide audience appeal 
for its film shows. 

One of the best examples of how re- 
placing a show can smooth the way for 
A-l clearances is Falstaff's experience 
with MCA-Tv's State Trooper. The 
brewer had been in good slots with the 
Celebrity Playhouse anthologv and 
w hen State Trooper came along I Fal- 
staff had been associated with the 
show's star. Rod Cameron, for three 
years in City Detective) there were 
few clearance problems. 

MCA Tv reported that the agency, 



10 



SPONSOR 



2 FKBRl ARY 1957 



ARE YOU 

HALF-COVERED 




THIS 

AREA 

IS 

LINCOLN- 
LAND 





1956 ARB METROPOLITAN 

AREA COVERAGE STUDY 

PROVES KOLN-TV SUPERIORITY! 

The 1956 ARB Study of 231 Metropolitan markets in- 
cluded 6 in LINCOLN LAND — 5 in Nebraska, 1 in Kansas. 

In these 6 markets, KOLN-TV is viewed- 
most in 6 daytime categories ... in 5 
out of 6 nighttime categories. 

KOLN-TV gets on average daytime, "viewed-most" rating 
of 54.0% as against 15.2% for the next station. Night- 
time averages are 59.8% for KOLN-TV, 25.0% for the 
next station Enough said? 






^vf N3>>i 



1* 



WKZO TV — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 
WKZO RADIO -KALAMAZOO BATTLE CREEK 
WJEF RADIO — GRAND RAPIDS 
WJEF-FM — GRAND RAPIDS KALAMAZOO 
KOLN-TV— LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 
Alloc aled -lh 

WmBD RADIO— PEORIA. ILLINOIS 



KOUNf-TV covers Lincoln-Land 200.0(1(1 families, 
125,000 of them unduplicated by any Omaha T\ signal! 

95.5% OF LINCOLN-LAND IS OUTSIDE OMAHA'S 
GRADE "B" COVERAGE! Thia Important 42-county 

market is as independent of Omaha as Hartford is of 
Providence ... or South Bend is of Fort Wayne. 

Latest Telepulse figures show that KOLN-TV gets 194.4$ 
more nighttime viewers than the next station. 13H.KV more 
afternoon viewers! 

Let Avery-Knodel give you the facts on KOLN-TV, the 
Official Basic CBS-ABC Outlet for South Central Nebraska 
and Northern Kansas. 

CHANNEL 10 • 316,000 WATTS • 1000-FT. TOWER 

KOLN-TV 

COVERS LINCOLN-LAND— NEBRASKA'S OTHER BIG MARKET 
Vvery-Knodel, Inc.. Exclusive National Representatives 



SPONSOR 



2 FEBRUARY 1957 



D-F-S. racked up a record of 91% 
Class "A" time clearances in the 71- 
niarket, 28-state area covered by the 
show. Here's the clearance list (note 
the high number of clearances later in 
the evening when young people — in 
which a brewer is not interested — are 
likely to be in bed.) : 

6:30-7:00 p.m.— 3 

7:00-7:30 p.m.— 3 

7:30-8:00 p.m.— 11 

8:00-8:30 p.m.— 7 

8:30-9:00 p.m.— 8 

9:00-9:30 p.m.— 8 

9:30-10:00 p.m.— 19 

10:00-10:30 p.m.— 10 

10:30-11:00 p.m.— 2 

FalstafT, incidentally, had examined 
the idea of co-sponsoring the show but 
concluded it could get more out of full 
sponsorship. Falstaff's consideration 
of the idea, however, is symptomatic 
of a migraine just as prevalent in spot 
as on the network: how to keep pro- 
graming costs down without losing au- 
dience or program identification. 

The asperin for this headache is, of 
course, alternate week programing. 
On the syndication level this solution 
is both more complicated and simpler 
than on the network. On the one hand, 
network alternate week sponsorship is 



often a matter of sharing two or more 
shows to spread program risk and not 
lose audience, while in the spot tv film 
field advertisers are usually not 
wealthy enough or don't have a large 
enough product lineup to have more 
than one show per market. Hence, the 
co-sponsorship problems are just con- 
fined to one show. 

On the other hand, a half dozen (or 
even more) clients may split a syndi- 
cated film show, with some co-sponsors 
taking only one market. This means 
that, in addition to the regular clear- 
ance problem, a co-sponsor must find 
a partner, since the station will not 
usually clear time when a show is only 
half-sponsored. Furthermore, the co- 
sponsor must find a suitable partner — 
not just a non-competitive advertiser 
but one whose product will not in any 
way destroy the values the original 
co-sponsor is seeking. The consider- 
able growth of co-sponsorship is evi- 
dent proof, however, that these prob- 
lems can be solved without too much 
trouble. 

Some sponsors are fortunate enough 
to find a suitable partner in most, if 
not all, their markets. An example is 
Continental Baking, which shares CBS 
Film's Annie Oakley in practically all 



FROM A "CAT'S WHISKER 
TO A COLISEUM! 



Crystal sets to satellites . . . only decades away from the first primitive 
experiments looms today's giant 12 billion dollar radio-electronics industry. 
Now, all 4 floors of New York City's Coliseum are needed to display one 
year's growth! 

The purpose of The Radio Engineering Show is to bring new and 
stimulating ideas in radio-electronics to engineers. To achieve this more 
than 200 papers will be presented by 22 professional groups at the Conven- 
tion's 55 technical sessions. Over 800 new ideas in radio-electronics engi- 
neering will also be presented by 834 exhibitors representing more than 
80% of the productive capacity of the industry. 

Yes, it's big in size, big in scope. Whatever your special interests, 
attending this Convention can cut weeks off your "keeping informed" time. 
Plan now to be there. 



Save time; a whole year's productive effort seen in 
days! See all that's new in radio-electronics products, 
developments, and engineering — meet the men respon- 
sible! Hear the best technical papers about your spe- 
cialty! Meet old friends, make new ones, enjoy asso- 
ciation and social events! 



Ml 



IRE Members $1.00 
Non-members $3.00 



^ 



MARCH 
18-21 

The IRE National 
il Convention 

Waldorf Astoria Hotel 

and The Radio Engineering Sho 



• production! 

& 3 lecture halls 

• INSTRUMENTSt 

& COMPONENTS, 

COMPONENT PARTSr 

• EQUIPMENT' 



Coliseum 



New York City 



The 
® Institute of 
|,\ Radio 

Engineers 

1 East 79th Street. New York 21. N.V. 



of its 74 markets with Carnation on a 
major-minor basis. 

Continental is one of those almost- 
but-not-quite national advertisers. It is 
not regional but high spots the U. S. T 
covering the east and west coasts, the 
midwest but not the southeast. It has 
used and still uses network tv during 
the day but would end up with too 
much waste circulation on nighttime 
network tv because of the more strin- 
gent lineup requirements at night. 

(The baking company now sponsors 
Howdy Doody on NBC TV Saturday 
mornings (10:00-10:30) alternating 
with Sweets Co. It uses a short lineup 
of 65 stations. Continental was also 
associated with the show when it was 
a late afternoon weekday strip on NBC 
TV. Here, too, it bought a limited 
network.) 

Annie Oakley has been working for 
Continental almost a year now. The 
show was picked after a test in four 
markets, a kind of preparation not too 
many clients take the trouble to go 
into. The bakery has a valuable prop- 
erty in Gail Davis, star of the show, 
who not only is considered a cracker- 
jack in commercial selling but pro- 
vides valuable tie-ins for Continental 
in her appearances with Gene Autry's 
rodeo. (Autry's Flying "A" studio 
produces the show.) 

Continental is after the kids to a 
large extent and so aimed for clear- 
ances between 5:00 and 7:00 p.m., a 
relatively easv time to clear because it 
is station option time. Continental ad 
manager Lee Mack Marshall said that 
the agency, Ted Bates, cleared a sub- 
stantial portion of stations in the 
6:00-6:30 p.m. slot with only a few 
stations clearing it before 5:00 or af- 
ter 7:00 p.m. 

A surprisingly high percentage of 
women watch the show, Marshall 
found out. A surve\ six months ago 
showed the audience broken down 50- 
50 between children and adults. The 
repeat pattern for the Continental-Car- 
nation buy in 1956 was 26 first runs 
and 26 reruns. This pattern will prob- 
ably be repeated through 1957, since 
the ratings show no appreciable differ- 
ence between new and rerun shows. 
"The kids stick with it." Marshall said. 

Like most sponsors, Continental is 
interested primarily in two things from 
a film show: the right audience and 
enough of it. Like many sponsors. 
Continental finds it can fulfill both of 
these requirements through the pur- 
chase of syndicated film. ^ 



48 



SPONSOR 



2 FEBRUARY 1957 




MOUSETRAP, STEAM TRAP, SEWER TRAP 



...it makes no difference 



. . . the world won't beal a path to the door of 
the man who builds a better one and then doesnt 
advertise it so that people will know about his 
product, know where it can be bought and how- 
much it costs. 

Advertising benefits the buyer, too. It tells you 
the product story, makes it easy for you to buy. 
Even more important to you, advertising leads 



to ma^ production and volume sales 
means lower costs and 
lower prices. 

} es, "Advertising 
Benefits You" . . . 
'specially business- 
paper advertising. 



which 




SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC 



SPONSOR • 2 FEBRUARY 1957 



49 



FEATURES 

i Continued from page 36) 

house, t he audience comes with the 
scpectation <>l being there a couple of 
hours. It, therefore, has patience with 
character delineation and movies that 
lake their time about setting up the 
background and mood of a story. 

" \l home the viewer is impatient 
and wants to gel into the story right 
away. Since lie can switch off the pro- 
gram without losing anything, you just 
have In adapt yourself to this kind of 
viewing no matter how good \ou think 
a Feature is." 

^ &R also learned, the agency man 
continued, that the big, glossy musi- 
cals Hollywood is so fond of are lost 
on the tv screen. As for comedy, he 
said, much <>l it appears dated. 

He pointed out, however, thai there 
are exceptions to this. "Zany comedy 
like the Marx Brothers do is still pop- 
ular. And there are some musicals, 
especialb those with top names, that 
can command attention."" He also 
pointed out that star names can still 
drag 'em in front of the set even if 
the movies don't always conform to 
the rough standards set forth above. 

Evaluation of movies is admittedly 
a tricky business, especially since, un- 



like a program series, each one has 
to be gauged alone. Some admen think 
the safest thing to do is study the 
dollar grosses in theatrical distribution 
on the theory that what's popular with 
theatrical audiences will be popular 
with t\ audiences. 

Aside from the dissent indicated 
from ^ &R those familiar with the 
mo\ ic business point out that I 1 I some 
movies had fair grosses only because 
ol heavy promotion (2) some features 
have what looks like lair grosses be- 
cause they were linked with a top fea- 
ture in a double bill and (3) the movie 
industry itself has had plenty of ex- 
perience with the fact that public 
tastes change. 

C&C T\ proposes that the dollar 
-losses be combined with three other 
factors in evaluating a movie's tv ap- 
peal. The other factors are: the sta- 
tion's record of feature film promo- 
tion, the record of the film's producer 
and the appeal of the m.c. RKO T\ 
suggests taking into account how the 
star's current theatrical features are 
grossing, going to the clipping services 
for a roundup of reviews of the movie 
in question and studying local ratings 
for hints of the type of programing 
that goes over in the particular mar- 
ket the advertiser is concerned with. 



While there are plenty of proposals 
and formulas for evaluating features, 
there is more use of just plain intuition 
i 'I throw darts at the names of movies 
pasted on the wall," said one adman.) 
than agencies will publicly admit. Some 
stations have hired men with movie 
experience to help them program their 
features and some of the agencies con- 
>ult with movie executives on this 
problem. 

\\ here the client is not particularly 
interested in first-run-on-tv features 
there i> already on the record a con- 
siderable amount of rating material. 
Perhaps the most exploited single 
movie on t\ is 30 Seconds over Tokyo, 
which Colgate used to open its MGM 
buy on KTTV. The show received a 
28 rating in Los Angeles and, more 
recently, a 40 rating on KPHO-TV, 
Phoenix, a four-station market. Admen 
have noticed that some of the Clark 
Cable pictures draw good audiences. 
However, a number of the 52 Gable 
features involve him in minor roles. 

\\ bile high ratings remove the need 
for any analysis, a medium rating 
should be studied more carefully. Pro- 
gram competition, time of day, day 
of the week, number of stations in the 
market are all factors which can some 
times lead an adman to conclude that 




50 



SPONSOR • 2 FEBRUAKY 1957 



,i feature can <l" bettei undei othei < ii 
cumstances. 

Tin- da) "I the week can bave ■> big 
influence <>n ratings, particularly in 
those markets where all the Btations 
are network affiliates and i h« ■ prime 
time is taken with network shows. 
Therefore, late evening time on Frida) 
and Saturdaj nights and afternoon 

ti on Sunday are considered "prime 

time" for features. B-M s features are 
inn on Frida) and Saturday nights in 
all six markets. Colgate bought Frida) 

nights for it- -how. In -nine cases, net- 
work shows have been dropped, how- 
ever, to carrj features. \\ I II. -T\ . 
Philadelphia, for example, replaced 
\l!< I \ - feature show on Saturday 
between 7:30 and 9:00 p.m. with its 
own features. 

\- foi costs, agencies are watching 
station rates and prices carefully. In 
;i number ol cases, features bave come 
up with juicj costs-per* 1,000 in the 
neighborhood of $1 and v 2. However, 
the impressive rating histories of some 
of tlic feature show- have naturall) 
resulted in higher rates. One rep 
pointed out to sponsor: "You have to 
remember that the network stations 
which have laid out a lot of fancy let- 
tine for feature- have to amortize this 
COSl in "B" ami "C" time. It'- prett) 



hard i"i anj network affiliate to kirk 
..it 90 minutes oi two hours »"i th of 
network shows in prime time. So, even 
if the feature i atinga aren t sensa- 
i ional, .i -t. in. .n i- likel) to raise i ates 

-omew hat." 

I \ in w iili the doubling ol Bpol rates 
in numerous i as< - the features .n>- 
returning good, & onomii .il i osts-pei ■ 
I .ikmi to the ad\ ei i isei outside ol pi ime 
time. \- a mallei ol fact, some of the 
-t.ii ion option pei iods, especiall) in 

the late evening, look -.. q I on a 

slide rule that there appears to be the 
beginning ol a move from " \" time 
to what used to l>e less desirable peri- 
ods. \\ bile ii i- too eai K to call this 
a trend, if ii does develop into one ii 

could plaj bavOC with the lrailition.il 

local i. ite -i ructure. 

The late night buys are being mulled 
ovei i ■ for anothei reason ; the ad- 

vertiser jet- a minute rather than 20- 

seconds oi an I.I'. Furthermore, net- 
work advertisers can throw their film 
commercials into the feature periods 
with no extra costs except re-use \>,w- 
ments to talent- and not even that in 
cases where the maximum rate has 
already been paid. 

Full-feature sponsorship is a special 
pricing problem to buyers. There is 
not onh the outlay for a full 90-min- 



utes "I i ime but the additional pr< 
urn the advertisei pa) - foi being able 
to pick his features, ["he i 

f< atun - i M. ill . - alon ■ m iili lull 

i. ii in. sponsorship sin< e thai typ 
bu) would not be worthwhile unless 
the features wen (a) si rong audii 
attrai i ions and ' b i the t\ pe of feature 
v. Iih Ii i .in .i.l.l something exl i .i to the 
mil product 
Both B-M and < olgati paid premi- 
ums foi ill. ii mo\ ie deals, making the 

i ai -i ' onsiderabl) highei than 

the (so SPONSOR-SI 0P1 

I, imi.ii \ 1 95 . . page 9). • olgate paid 
.i whopping 1780,000 foi the films in 
its .-'-week I. m and 1200,000 for time. 
I n ii- deal w iih the I i iangle stations, 
which represent foui of the -i\ market- 
in which IJ-\I has full-feature sponsor- 
ship, B-M paid a single pa< kage : 

foj the four -lation-. I lure wa- no 

discounl pattern involved. The B-M 

bu) limke ilou 11 aS follow- : dll' i fnl 

programing and h • ' i for time. 

It appears that before the wintei is 
over, a numbei ol important decisions 
relating to feature film will be in the 
advertising hopper. Considering 1 1 1<- 
impact feature film has alreaiK had. 
these decisions will certainly add up 
to iiii|ini lant advertising de\ elupments 
in t\ . ^ 



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with matchless merchandising and promotion advantages built right into the script. 
"Aggies" going places. . . and so is any advertiser who travels with her! 



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RKO TELEVISION 



a division of 



RKO TELERADIO PICTURES, INC. 



1140 Broadway 
New York 18 
LO 4-8000 



SPONSOR • 2 FEBRUARY 19 5 , 



51 



SPONSOR ASKS 




Should tv station breaks be more than thirty seconds 5 









Rollo Hunter, director of radio & tv, 
I. iiiin. II ast •> & Co., Int.. \i-ii )tnl. 

We have to approach this subject fac- 
ing the fact that the network station 
break has already broken the thirtv 
second barrier. CBS takes forty, NBC 
takes thirty-five, ABC takes thirty-five. 
However, those extra seconds over 
thirt) don't do the local stations am 
monetary good because they are cus- 
tomarily filled with "sta\ tuned for 
what follows"" plugs. Even in those 
instances when stations bootleg this 
sliver of promotional time from the 
network la practice not entirely un- 
heard of ) . it really doesn't mean added 
revenue for the station. Usually, it 
just means that Joe's Garage gets a 
few more words crowded into the 
chain break. 

It's impossible to ignore the point 
of view of some stations dissatisfied 
with their network take: a longer 
break might solve a lot of problems. 
By volume increase, it might do quite 
a bit toward making the books look 
better. It might curb local rate hikes. 
And from one viewpoint of the spot 
bu\er, it would certainly be nice to 
have more prime availabilities — more 



it s the staying 
power of the 
viewer" 



of those choice adjacencies which are 
getting harder and harder to find. The 
trouble is. there's a catch. It's the 
staying power of the viewer. 

\l it is now. break time is pretty 
much of a clutter. A typical period 
begins with the closing commercial of 
a show, followed shortly by a cross 
plug for nexl week's sponsor, followed 




b\ credits, followed by this week's 
sponsor identification, followed by a 
program plug, followed by a twenty 
second spot, followed by an eight sec- 
ond spot, very closely followed by sta- 
tion identification coupled with an- 
other program plug, followed by the 
opening billboard of a new show, and 
not too long thereafter, followed by 
the first commercial of the new show. 
That's quite a load of disparate im- 
pressions to flash at a viewer. 

Such concentration of commercial 
messages puts each in sharper competi- 
tion with its neighbors, often forces 
agencies to the hard-hard sell or the 
man-from-Mars approach — anything to 
stand out from the crowd. Maybe the 
crowd shouldn't get any bigger. De- 
sirable as it would be to enlarge upon 
good adjacencies and to increase sta- 
tion revenues at the same time, stretch- 
ing the break might very well be short- 
sighted. After all, if it would dissi- 
pate the effectiveness of spots while 
whittling away at the programs, then 
it can't be such a hot idea. 



Marshall H. Pengra, general manager, 
KLTV, Tyler, Texas 

\\ ith the stations averaging some 27% 
net compensation from the total net- 
work rate, after free hours for lines, it 
gets tough for many of the stations to 
make enough from the 30 seconds al- 
lowed to pay the bills. Network reve- 
nue to stations could only support a 
few of the top metropolitan stations at 
best — probably o&o's. but that's really 
out of m\ field of knowledge — I'm 
only guessing. In our own case, and 
in the case of optional stations in much 
larger markets, that diamond-precious 
30 seconds is the only breadwinner we 
have in "A" and "AA" time periods. 

I'm sure station men are fullv aware 
of the importance of network shows — 
the\ make the station break valuable. 




\\ bat we contend is that compared to 
other media, tv is tremendously under 
commercialized, and has room for ex- 
pansion in that direction. Look at the 
newspapers, magazines and billboards! 
I he) carr\ such a high percentage of 
advertising to news matter, yet adver- 
tisers sta\ right with it. 

We don't want tv to run wild in this 
direction, but in this da\ of ever in- 
creasing network and spot rates, one 
big and important way to take a little 
break in those constant increases is to 
give the stations an additional 30 sec- 
onds at the break, and let the client 



"tv is under- 
commercial- 
ized' 



have a breather for a change! I hear 
the agencies screaming about rate in- 
creases and about the cost-per-1000 — 
win can't we put a real slow down on 
rate increases, vet take a volume in- 
crease for ourselves In opening up 
those station breaks and further insist- 
ing that all spectaculars and hours 
must also reserve at least a 30 second 
break for stations. 

Just because a station break has 
been 30 seconds long for 29 years, 
doesn't necessarily mean that it was 
the right length, and radio ain't t\ ! 

Avery Gibson, director of research, UK 

Television. Int.. New York 
The increased demand for one-minute 
availabilities is creating problems 
among network affiliates. More NBC 
and CBS television stations are losing 
national spot business, and consequent- 
ly revenue, because of their inability 
to deliver one minute spot commercials 



52 



SPONSOR • 2 FEBRUARY 1957 



during pi ime time. Mori and more 
advertisers are asking foi minutes, and 
stations which carrj .1 heav) line-up "f 
network programs 1 u -1 cannol fill this 
increasing demand. 

During the daytime, advertisers have 
always wanted and received minute 
,i\.iil- In recent months, as feature 
h I in and othei non-network program- 
ing have demonstrated an increasing 

tbilit) I" alti.nl large audiem e-. na- 
tional advertisers have purchased 
minutes in Buch programs, and in good 



schedules 
bursting at 
tin- seams" 




me, too. Since minutes are 
<>nl\ during non-network 



evening 
available 

hours, \KC affiliates with less network 
time, and independent stations have 
reaped the windfall <>f minute sales 
during prime time. As a result, net- 
work affiliates are increasingly being 
placed at a competitive disadvantage. 

Networks should strongly consider 
making a minute available to affiliate 
stations between network shows. As 
the networks demand more and more 
of a station's option time, and as they 
schedule longer programs, the affili- 
ate- are losing precious time for local 
and national spot sale. 

I hi- move would benefit the net- 
work-" programing, in that the one- 
minute chain break would prompt pro- 
gram producers to lietter integrate 
commercial- into the format of the 
show, making both the commercial and 
program more attractive to the viewer. 

Network affiliates are caught in a 
squeeze from both ends. The adver- 
tisers are demanding minutes in all 
time periods, and networks more and 
more station clearance. Stations are 
desperatelv trying to oblige, by shoe- 
horning both minutes and network 
programing into schedules alreadv 
bursting at the seams. 

Since the network and the station 
are in effect a partnership, that which 
benefits one will in turn benefit the 
other, \fter all. stations and networks 
are inter-dependent. It should be mu- 
tually advantageous to fill the advertis- 
ers needs for both spot minutes and 
network clearance. The lengthening of 
breaks to one minute should alleviate 
both problems. ^ 




with reference to that cherry tree legend 

WE CAN'T TELL A LIE, EITHER! 

All the evidence we uncover points to strong leader- 
ship in all categories tor 

WCSH-TV 

in southern Maine and eastern New Hampshire 

AUDIENCE PREFERENCE (Pulse Nov. 11-17, '56) 
365 to 78 quarter hours weekly 

MORE TV HOMES REACHED (Nielsen =2— 1956) 

MORE SPONSORS .... 261 in 1956 

PLUS . . . leadership in top-rated feature films 
(once weekly, 3 out of 4) 
leadership in top syndicated films 
(12 out of 19 — November Pulse) 

SELL IT ON WCSH-TV 




Affiliate 

WEED TELEVISION 
Representatives 




WCSH-TV 
PORTLAND, MAINE 



SPONSOR • 2 FEBRUARY 1957 







top m 

in Central 
ARKANSAS* 




* PROVED BY SEVEN 

CONSECUTIVE MONTHLY 

HOOPER RATINGS! 



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New York: Richard O'Connell. Inc. 
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Chicago: Radio-TV Rep., Inc. 







Agency profile 



Charles Feldman: welders write too 

["here's at least one top-level agenc) executive who insists he's not 
"an expert," and that's Y&R's \.p. in charge of the commercial 
department. Charles Feldman. 

"I prefer to think that I kn<»u how to delegate authority," he 
told SPONSOR, propping his feet on a chair opposite him. and looking 
wistfulh at a painting of a typewriter on the wall in his office. 

•'Those were the fun-days," he reminisced. •'The days of copy- 
writing. I don't get a chance to do that any more. These days, 
I'm involved mainly with client relations, administrative work and 
something you can class generally as inspiring and criticizing the 
creative work in radio and tv commercials." 

ll s small wonder that Feldman doesn't pound out wordage on 
a typewriter am more. As head of an L76-man department, he's 
responsible for a minimum of 5,000 units of air commercials that 




"Actually writing copy' 



rt of this busine 



avs Feldman 



Y&R turns out in one year. Since the inception of tv about 10 years 
ago, the volume in the department has grown from some §16.000 
to $82 million lair billings for 1956). 

"The big philosophy underhing Y&R's radio-tv commercials work 
is the fact that there's no formula for a good commercial," says 
Feldman. "We tr\ to approach each individual product with a fresh 
point of view, judging it b\ one criterion only: Will it sell? And 
of course, there's the area where you get into blue-sky. I feel a 
commercial will sell if it has a good, sound creative idea as a base 
and is written and conceived to hold the audiences interest. 

Production values. Feldman feels, follow the creative idea in 
importance. "I'd rather see a good idea only fairly \s ell produced, 
than a bad idea with a Cecil B. DeMille treatment. Of course, 
ideallv copv and production both are top-grade" 

While YM{ has no set formula for the amount of a client's budget 



SPONSOR 



2 FEBRUARY 1957 



ili.ii should be spent <>n his commercials, Feldman finds thai the 
percentage tends i" average oul al approximately 7-.':', ol the (v 
time aiid talent costs for a client a program. 

"In print, mechanical costs are generally 1095 ol the Bpace 
budget," he told sponsor. "And I don't think that any man faced 

with the problem of creating and producing t\ c mercials would 

object i" seeing more financial leeway. On the othei hand, lavish 
production alone would be do guarantee i" .i good Belling job. 

Feldman's a down-to-earth man in his mid-forties, with .< bread- 
and-butter approach I" the job. Dark-complexioned and grey-haired, 
be -| H-ak- with an off-hand simplicity, seems i" hesitate using Buch 
standard expressions as "creative" and "popular appeal. He feels 
that agency copywriters are basically craftsmen with definite Bkills 
and Berious purpose, rather than "some mythical concept "I genius. 

Madison ivenue copywriters are also human beings 

"Just because a man's writing copy on Madison Wenue, doesnt 
make him a freak," he said. "He's ~ t i 1 1 a guy. He knows what peo- 
ple want, ami he's got the same background as tin- people he want- 
in reach. Madison Wenue is a big misnomer to -tart with. I he 
industry i- sometimes condemned 1>\ a stereotype concepl formed 
from a few •_! 1 1 \ — who hang around '21.' Most <>f the guys here don t 
stop <>IT for a Martini. They go home after work like any guy in 
Detroit or Pittsburgh." 

Tin' diversified backgrounds ol ^ &B copywriters tend to bear out 
Feldman's observation. "We've had top t\ copywriters who'd l>een 
actor-, farmers, novelists. We've even had a former zinc welder. 
Mc I started out a- a window dresser, and then became a stenog- 
rapher in a small Baltimore agency." 

In the past two-and-a hall decades, however. Feldman's been en- 
d in some form of copywriting or supervision right at Y&R. 
N"i did he go into the field as a second choice. "I may have gotten 
into copy somewhat accidentally at the -tail." he told sponsor, 
"lnil once I got in it. I loved it. I've never wanted to write a novel 
or for that matter, to write anything other than copy. It's a craft in 
it-elf that doesn't need outside justification." 

Says Feldman: •"The main talent, beyond the natural feel for 
words, which a copywriter needs is ability to -ell. and that doesn't 
mean years ol standing behind a counter. We look for an instinc- 
tive talent to persuade people. 

Since he- laced with the inevitable shortage of supply in top- 
level creative people, Feldman i- instituting a training pro-ram both 
on the writing and the production sides of his department, "(iood 
people can come into this business from any area." he stresses. "In 
fact, the broader their earlier experience, the richer the thoughts 
and idea- they'll bring to their copywriting or visualization." 

Feldman convex- a sense of personal modesty and virtual em- 
barrassment when he's asked to generalize about the busine— in 
which he -pent 25 years. Here'- a man with a reticence about 
words that seem- to stem from a di-like of using them in sweeping, 

far-reaching statements. 

I here are. however, some area- Feldman like- to talk about more 

freely : his granddaughter, his -on and daughter, and the occasional 
evenings of music he enjoys at home "I play at the' flute," he 
admits, "but my wife really plays the piano.") ^ 









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MUSIC 

2U hours a day ... 7 days a 
week . . . but music intelligently 
scheduled! Yes, today's- top hits, 
but also a generous variety of 
yesterday's great records plus a 
liberal taste of old tunes done up 
by the current group of fine 
entertainers. And it's all attrac- 
tively packaged by our team of 
7 popular radio personalities. 

NEWS 

32 Newscasts daily prepared by 
our 6-man news department and 
presented 5 minutes before the 
hour and half-hour. A UP news 
wire and sports wire, 2 mobile 
units, state correspondents, a 
weather wire, a police and fire 
radio monitor plus regularly 
scheduled telephone conversa- 
tions with local news sources 
keep WE MP listeners among 
the best informed in the ivorld^ 

SPORTS 

Live, play-by-play of Mil- 
waukee Braves Baseball, Green 
Bay Packer Football, U. of 
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ball, plus coverage of special 
local sporting events and 11 
sport scasts daily . . . provide a' 
wealth of entertainment for our 
sports minded listeners. In addi- 
tion, these features are described 
wherever possible by our Sports 
Director and "The Voice of the 
Braves," Earl Gillespie. 

represented wherever you lire by Headley-Rit<i^ 



56 



SPONSOR 



2 FEBRUARY 1957 



A u >->l.l\ kiting of chat 

in the advertising un<l broadcast fields 



EW AND RENEW 



ie. 



NEW ON RADIO NETWORKS 



SPONSOR 

B.inkirs Life & Casualty. Chi 
Bon Ami, NY 
Bon Ami. NY 
Bon Ami. NY 

Bon Ami. NY 
Calgon, Pitts 



Cla.rol. NY 

Kiplingcr Washington Agency, Wash. DC 

Kiplingcr Washington Agency. Wash DC 

Kiplingcr Washington Agency, Wash, DC 

Kn.ipp Monirch St. Louis 
Leeds Chemical Products. NY 

Leeds Chemical Products. NY 

Mutual Benefit Health & Accident Assn. 

Omaha 

North American Philips. NY 

Radio Bible Class, Crand Rapids, Mich . 

Scott Paper, Chester, Pa 

Wcco Products. Chi 



AGENCY STATIONS 

Grant, Schwenck & Baker, Chi MBS 
R&R. NY CBS 201 

.R&R, NY CBS 201 

.R&R. NY CBS 201 



.R&R, NY 
Kctcham. MacLeod & Crovc, 

Pitts 

.FC&B, NY 



_CBS 201 

.NBC 188 
CBS 201 

CBS 201 



Albert Frank-Cucnthcr Law, 

NY 
Albert Frank-Cucnthcr Law, 

NY CBS 201 

Albert Frank-Cucnthcr Law, 

NY CBS 201 

.Frank Block. St Louis NBC 188 

Leeds & York, Chi CBS 68 

Leeds & York, Chi CBS 68 

Bozell & Jacobs. Omaha CBS 201 

C | LaRoche, NY NBC 188 

John M. Camp, Wheaton. Ill ABC 

|WT, NY CBS 201 

|WT. Ch, CBS 201 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

Cabrul Hcatter; Tu 10-10 10 pm; 5 Feb. 
Amos n' Andy; Th 7 7 45 pm; 5 mm sig 7 Feb 21 Mar 
Calcn Drake; Sa 10 05 10 50 am . 5 mm stg; 2 Feb, 16 Mar 
Robert Q Lewis; Sa 11 05-12 n; 5 mm scg; 26 Jan 16 Feb, 

9, 30 Mar 
Wendy Warren; F 12.05-12:10 pm ; 25 |an. 8 Feb 8, 22 Mar 

Bill Goodwin: M-F 1:05-2 pm: 26 parties; 20 Feb; 13 wks 
Calcn Drake: Sa 10:05-1050 am; 5 min scg; 19 Jan, 13 April 

Sidney Walton; Su 12:05-12:20 pm; 6 Jan only 

Calen